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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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Sino-Soviet Split, 1960-1984

Documents on the growing division and worsening relations between China and the Soviet Union from 1960 onward. For other collections on Sino-Soviet relations, see Making of the Sino-Soviet Alliance, 1945-1950; Sino-Soviet Alliance, 1950-1959; Sino-Soviet Border Conflict, 1969; and Sino-Soviet Rapprochement, 1985-1989. (Image, Mao and Khrushchev, 1958)

  • October 27, 1978

    Conspect of Conversations with V. I. Potapov, Chief of Romanian Sector of CPSU CC Section

    V.I Potapov informs about a visit to Bucharest of the CPSU delegation led by A. A. Gromyko and the discussions regarding the “Bessarabian question,” criticism of the CPSU regarding RSR’s relations with the USA and NATO and independent relations with China, RSR’s distancing from the Soviet Union and the other socialist countries in terms of foreign policy.

  • December, 1978

    East German Report on the Tenth Interkit Meeting in Havana, December 1978

    This report, issued after the tenth Interkit meeting in Havana, addresses China's domestic and foreign policies. China is said to be obstructing the process of international détente by developing relations with NATO and West Germany. The report condemns the Chinese interference in Romanian, Yugoslavian and Korean politics. The authors believe that China is trying to divide the Socialist countries into two opposing groups. The newly intensified Chinese-US relations are criticized, as is China's policy of allowing more Western influence to shape its domestic policies and economic strategies.

  • February 09, 1979

    Mongolian Record of Conversation with Soviet Officials in Moscow, February 1979

    Discusses the cancellation of the alliance treaty between China and the Soviet Union, and the impact this will have on the Mongolian People’s Republic. They are urged not to hurry the cancellation of the treaty, however, because China has not yet explicitly asked for it. They also note that there are anti-Soviet propaganda items being spread in Korea, and the growing role the U.S. is playing in Chinese affairs.

  • April 12, 1979

    Mongolian Memorandum of Conversation with O.B. Rakhmanin

    Rakhmanin reports on the status of the Sino-Soviet treaty, which he says hinges on the Sino-Vietnamese situation, which he tries to explain in terms of territory and aid to the Vietnamese.

  • April 30, 1979

    Notes on a Meeting in the Great People's Palace in Peking on 30 April 1979 at 9 A.M

    Huang Hua says that "the Vietnamese were the Cubans of Asia but rather more dangerous." In addition to commenting on the situation in Indochina, Huang weighs in on Soviet and Cuban policies toward the Third World, events in the Middle East, and China's involvement in the United Nations.

  • July 28, 1979

    Transcript, Meeting of East German leader Erich Honecker and Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev, Crimea, 27 July 1979 (excerpt)

    Brezhnev reports to Honecker on international affairs.

  • October 04, 1979

    Transcript of Brezhnev Honecker summit in East Berlin (excerpt on Iran and Afghanistan)

    Transcript of Brezhnev Honecker summit in East Berlin (excerpt on Iran and Afghanistan) with Brezhnev discussing the leadership of Amin and expressing continued Soviet support for Afghanistan

  • October 18, 1979

    Transcript of CPSU CC Politburo Meeting (excerpt), 18 October 1979

    [Excerpt] Transcript of CPSU CC Politburo Meeting regarding telegrams from Cuba regarding the attitudes of SWAPO men and Angolans towards the Cubans and fighting. The Politburo members also discussed Sino-Soviet relations, Cuban sugar sales, and Soviet cooperation with Spain.

  • December, 1979

    Note regarding the Visit of the CC PUWP Inter-Departmental Study Group in China

    Discusses a recent visit in China by the CC PUWP noting that their ”fundamental opinions” about China were correct, and that there needs to be more active propaganda and further studies in China, such as those undertaken by Poland.

  • 1980

    CC CPSU Information on Chinese Foreign Policy Issues

    Discusses the joint efforts by Chinese and American leaders to promote a better relationship between these two countries, at the expense of the Soviet Union and of communism. The U.S. seems to be trying to capitalize on a growing “internal stability” in China, and the U.S. is even now selling equipment to China. The Soviet Union does not believe that this alliance will prove powerful enough to significantly impair other Socialist countries, but their alliance should also not be ignored.

  • February, 1980

    Polish Record of Soviet alliance Meeting in Moscow, February 1980

    Discusses the growing aggression seen in China and the effects of its closer relationship with the United States.

  • March 04, 1980

    CPSU CC Directive to Soviet Ambassadors in Communist Countries, Instructions 'About the China Question'

    Instructions to Soviet ambassadors on dealing with China's outreach to socialist countries in the eastern bloc, outlining a series of steps for Soviet ambassadors to follow which would foster skepticism about China’s intentions and thwart efforts by Chinese representatives to make wide-ranging contacts in these states. The directive notes China’s hostility to Vietnam, Cuba, Laos, and Mongolia and contrasts this with its development of extensive relations with Romania, Yugoslavia, and North Korea.

  • March 10, 1980

    Evaluation of Chinese Policies toward Eastern Europe by the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

    This document addresses China's alleged bid to undermine the unity of the Socialist countries while maintaining special relations with Romania, Yugoslavia, and North Korea. Chinese foreign policy is seen as interfering in the domestic affairs of the Socialist states. By maintaining contacts with Western countries and by encouraging further armament of NATO, China is undermining the position of the Warsaw Pact. The Soviet evaluation assesses China as an unreliable partner in international relations and advises that all contacts of the Chinese government with foreign organizations or authorities be closely monitored.

  • June, 1980

    East German Report on the Eleventh Interkit Meeting in Poland, June 1980

    Report from the East German representatives on the 11th Interkit meeting held in Poland. This was the first meeting attended by the Vietnamese.

  • June 18, 1980

    East German Record of a Meeting of Delegation Leaders at the Eleventh Interkit Meeting in Poland

    This record of a meeting of the delegation leaders attending the 11th Interkit meeting addresses China's strategy in the area of international relations. The document expresses concern regarding Beijing's policies and calls for unity among the Communist countries. International issues discussed include Soviet-Korean relations, i.e., the Belgrade meeting between Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev and his Korean counterpart Kim Il Sung. Conditions in Albania, Romania, and Yugoslavia, and the positions of these countries within the Communist bloc, are critically assessed. Another topic is the improvement of anti-Maoist propaganda.

  • October 02, 1980

    CPSU CC Politburo Directive to Soviet Ambassadors and Representatives, 'Carrying Out Additional Measures to Counter American-Chinese Military Cooperation'

    Instructions to Soviet ambassadors discussing the growing military cooperation between China and the United States.

  • November 10, 1980

    Hungarian Report on 'Economic Interkit' Meeting in Bulgaria, October 1980

    Reports on a meeting that took place in Bulgaria regarding cooperative measures to be taken in regards to the People’s Republic of China. It notes that China has reduced the number of items it seeks to import, and is hinting that it will continue to do so in the future, as well. The Soviets, however, would like to keep trade and even technological and scientific informational trade at the same level that it is at now.

  • December 11, 1980

    Secret Telegram No. 3267/IV - From Beijing to Warsaw

    Czyrek reports that he is going to release an official remark in Poland in order to divert a “wedge” that China is trying to create between the Soviet Union and Poland.

  • December 18, 1980

    Secret Telegram No. 3638/IV - From Moscow to Warsaw

    Notes that the Chinese are pretending to sympathize with the Soviets, but are really trying to take advantage of the situation in Poland.

  • November 16, 1981

    Sino-Soviet Trade, 1981

    Mongolian embassy official and Deputy Head of the USSR MFA meet to discuss Sino-Soviet relations. The latter notes that the Chinese have not had a change in their attitude or policy, so no positive changes can be expected. Issues related to trade, both physical, technical and scientific, are discussed.