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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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Sino-Soviet Split, 1960-1984

Documents on the growing division and worsening relations between China and the Soviet Union from 1960 onward. For other collections on Sino-Soviet relations, see Making of the Sino-Soviet Alliance, 1945-1950; Sino-Soviet Alliance, 1950-1959; Sino-Soviet Border Conflict, 1969; and Sino-Soviet Rapprochement, 1985-1989. (Image, Mao and Khrushchev, 1958)

  • December 29, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union, 'Attitude of the New Soviet Revisionist Leadership to the Situation in Vietnam''

    The Chinese Embassy in Moscow reports on Soviet policy toward Vietnam after Khrushchev's removal.

  • January 18, 1965

    Memorandum of Discussions between Romanian Worker’s Party leadership and Polish United Worker’s Party leadership

    The talks focus on several issues: namely the Multinational Nuclear Forces, Warsaw Pact relations with Albania, and the People's Republic of China. Gomulka and Dej also discuss the idea of convening a conference of Communist and Worker’s parties.

  • February 06, 1965

    Record of the First Contact between Premier Zhou and Vice Premier Chen Yi and Kosygin

    Premier Zhou and others meet to discuss the current situations in South Vietnam and Laos, U.S. and Soviet strategy, and Chinese-Soviet competition over civil aviation, among other pressing issues.

  • February 10, 1965

    Record of the Fifth Contact between Premier Zhou and Vice Premier Chen Yi and Kosygin (1)

    Zhou and Kosygin discussed the conflicts in Vietnam. They discussed in details of providing logistic and political supports to North Vietnam.

  • February 11, 1965

    Minutes from a Conversation between A.N. Kosygin and Mao Zedong

    The Soviet Union sent a delegation to the All-China Assembly of People's Representatives in Beijing. During this time, A.N. Kosygin and Mao Zedong discussed Vietnam including American military actions, Soviet assistance and support, and their socialist path. The conversation then moved towards a debate over spheres of military influence. The Soviets believed that they and the Chinese should unite to fight against American capitalism, but Mao stated that the Soviets should protect Europe and Chine should protect Asia. Other issues addressed included imperialism, Africa, the United Nations, foreign relations, and the concern over factions between communist states and internal factions within parties.

  • February 13, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Trade, 'Reporting the Situation of the Talks between the Premier and Kosygin concerning Trade'

    The Ministry of Foreign Trade summarizes the trade issues discussed by Zhou Enlai and Kosygin.

  • February 27, 1965

    Oral Statement of the PRC Government, Transmitted by PRC Vice Foreign Minister Liu Xiao to the Chargé d’Affaires of the USSR in the PRC, Cde. F. V. Mochulski

    The Chinese response to the Soviet request for China's opinion on a possible international conference on the subject of Indochina. The Chinese opinion is that to propose such a thing would make the Communist countries look weak and only encourage the United States.

  • March 01, 1965

    Zhou Enlai Talking to Ho Chi Minh

    Zhou Enlai discusses new Soviet Party leadership, a joint statement of support of Vietnam from socialist countries and close observation of Soviet military activities.

  • March 03, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ‘Chinese Students Intending to Participate in the Demonstrations Organized by the Vietnamese Students’

    The Chinese Embassy reports that students from Vietnam are organizing a protest against the United States in Moscow and have requested that students from China join the rally.

  • March 04, 1965

    Record of an Important Phone Call, ‘The Soviet Police have Captured and Wounded Chinese and Vietnamese Students who were Protesting against the United States’

    The Chinese Embassy makes an emergency report on the arrest and injuring of Chinese and Vietnamese students following the protests against the United States in Moscow.

  • March 05, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ‘Reporting on the Talks with the Vietnamese Attaché’

    The Chinese Embassy in Moscow reports how the Vietnamese government plans to protest against the Soviet Union's suppression of student demonstrations.

  • March 05, 1965

    Phone Call with the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union

    Chinese students in the Soviet Union were beaten and arrested by Soviet police during the protests against the US bombing of Vietnam held in Moscow.

  • March 05, 1965

    Cable from the Division of Soviet and East European Affairs to the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry requires additional details and clarifications on the protests in Moscow against the United States.

  • March 05, 1965

    Cable from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to Ambassador Pan Zili, ‘Protest to the Soviet Union over the Soviet Police’s Suppression of the Demonstrations against the US and their Arrest and Wounding of Chinese Students’

    Zhou Enlai gives instructions to Ambassador Pan Zili to issue a formal note of protest to the Soviet Union following the crackdown on Chinese and Vietnamese students protesting against the United States in Moscow.

  • March 05, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ‘On the Situation of the Vietnamese Embassy’s Nguyen Phu’s Report to Zhang Dake’

    The Vietnamese Ambassador meets with the Soviet Ministry of Foreign Affairs following the crackdown on Vietnamese and Chinese student protestors in Moscow.

  • March 05, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ‘Soviet Suppression of Student Demonstrations’

    The Chinese Embassy in Moscow reports on the "barbaric actions" of Soviet police, who injured and arrested students from China and Vietnam, among other countries.

  • March 05, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'On the Request for Instructions/Approval concerning the Soviet Military and Police's Crackdown on Anti-US Demonstrators and the Arrests and Injuring of Overseas Chinese Students'

    The Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs considers how to respond to the Soviet suppression of student demonstrations in Moscow.

  • March 06, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ‘On the Number of Vietnamese Students Injured’

    The Chinese Embassy in Moscow suggests that a discrepancy exists in the number of Vietnamese students injured offered by the Vietnamese embassy and the number actually hurt in the Moscow protests.

  • March 08, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ‘The Vietnamese Report They Have Issued a Non-Public Protest to the Soviets’

    The Chinese Embassy in Hanoi reports that the Vietnamese government has made an approach to the Soviet Union following the suppression of student protests in Moscow.

  • March 08, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ‘The Situation of the Responses from Vietnamese Students’

    The Chinese Embassy in Moscow reports on the effectiveness of China's broadcasting messages in Russian.