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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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Soviet Foreign Policy

Documents on the international relations and foreign policy of the Soviet Union. See also United States-Soviet Relations and the Warsaw Pact. (Image, Nixon and Khrushchev in Moscow, 1959, NARA RG306-RMN-1-21)

  • February 17, 1990

    Excerpt from Protocol No. 179 of the Meeting of the Politburo CC CPSU, 'On the Upcoming Elections in Nicaragua'

    The CC CPSU approves of the analysis made by E. A. Shevardnadze and A.N. Yakovlev on the upcoming elections in Nicaragua and the position of the Sandinista National Liberation Front.

  • March 21, 1990

    Letter from Deputy Minister of Defense of the USSR, M. Moiseyev to L.H. Zaikov, 21 March 1990.

    The letter concerns Afghanistan and arms sales.

  • April 05, 1990

    CPSU CC Protocol #184/38, 05 April 1990

    This document concerns the meeting of the Politburo on the international division of the CPSU CC.

  • April 12, 1990

    Resolution of the Secretary of the CC CPSU, 12 April 1990

    On changes in the composition of war councils of some autonomous republics and regions of the RSFSR.

  • May 11, 1990

    CPSU CC Protocol #187/18, 11 May 1990

    This protocol deals with military, defense, and economic matters of the Soviet Union. It also contains a report pertaining to Soviet relations with Ethiopia.

  • May 16, 1990

    CPSU CC Memo with extract of Politburo Protocol #187 of 16 May 1990 and other attachments

    Memo concerns a directive for the discussions with US Secretary of State James Baker between May 16 and 19, 1990 in Moscow. There are also attachments concerning the quantity of warheads , cooperation, and the armed forces of the US and USSR.

  • October 29, 1990

    Record of a Conversation Between M. S. Gorbachev and President of France, F. Mitterrand

    Record of conversation between Mikhail Gorbachev and Francois Mitterrand, on the subject of Saddam Hussein and his invasion of Kuwait. Both leaders stress the importance of avoiding military conflict and the necessity of a united front for the permanent members of the UN Security Council in order to achieve this. Mitterrand notes his apprehension over the US perception of UN Charter Article 51 and the possibility US initiation of hostilities.

  • November 20, 1990

    Record of Conversation between M. S. Gorbachev and British Prime Minister M. Thatcher

    Gorbachev and Thatcher discuss the potential response through the UN to Saddam Hussein's invasion of Kuwait.

  • November 21, 1990

    Record of Conversation between M. S. Gorbachev and Canadian Prime Minister B. Mulroney in Paris

    Gorbachev and Mulroney discuss the potential response through the UN to Saddam Hussein's invasion of Kuwait.

  • November 27, 1990

    Record of Conversation between M. S. Gorbachev and the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Saudi Arabia, S. Al Faisal

    Gorbachev and Al Faisal discuss ongoing crisis caused by the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait.

  • January 11, 1991

    CPSU CC Reports, 11 January 1991

    Reports "On the development of the new position of the War Councils in the arming of the USSR, internally, externally, and with railroad troops" and "On the delimitation of function of governmental and party organs in the work of the War Councils."

  • January 25, 1991

    Report of Secretary of the CC CPSU - Republic and Regional Committee Party - 25 January 1991

    Includes CC CPSU Report of 11 January 1991.

  • May 21, 1991

    CPSU CC Report, 21 May 1991

    This report deals with the political crisis in Ethiopia and Eritrea. It also concerns Soviet plans to settle the conflict.

  • May 31, 1991

    CPSU CC Reports: 31 May 1991 and 14 May 1991

    These documents deal with the military strength of the USSR and arms.

  • 2010

    Sergey Khrushchev on Crimea [excerpt]

    Sergey Khrushchev, son of Nikita Khrushchev, recalls the 1954 transfer of Crimea from Soviet Russian to Soviet Ukraine. At the time it was an uncontroversial decision, but later after the fall of the Soviet Union the loss of Crimea was seen in a negative light by the Russian public.