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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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Cuban Foreign Relations

 Documents on Cuban's international relations, focusing on its relationship with the Soviet Union, China and the United States. See also the Cuban Missile Crisis. (Image, Zhou Enlai and Che, 1965)

  • December 15, 1970

    Memorandum Regarding Bulgarian-Cuban Relations

    In a memorandum, Konstantin Tellalov, Head of the Foreign Policy and International Relations Department of the Central Committee of BCP, and Foreign Minister Ivan Bashev evaluate Cuban-Bulgarian relations. Tellalov and Bashev contextualize Cuba's development both nationally and internationally. Cuba's primary concerns are related to its economy (re: housing, rationing, embargo). Cuba's leadership continues to display a limited understanding of Marxism-Leninism, scientific planning (central planning), and the importance of COMECON. Taking into consideration the Bulgarian delegation’s recent visit to Cuba, they stress the importance of Cuba's success and the need for a radical, all-embracing commitment to relations.

  • May, 1972

    Report on Fidel Castro’s Visit to Bulgaria and Bulgarian-Cuban relations

    The report details Bulgaria’s preparations for a Cuban delegation and the visit itself. The author offers both praise and criticism of Cuban leadership. There has been positive progress in Cuba in recent years, yet underlying problems remain (e.g. the economy lacks planning). The Bulgarian government devised the visit as an opportunity to teach the Cuban delegation about building state socialism. The report includes an overview of the Cuban delegations visit. Discussions during the visit involved Cuban economic growth and barriers, China, Romania’s non-interventionist policies, Nixon’s 1972 visit to Moscow, and economic and scientific cooperation (particularly between Bulgaria and Cuba).

  • December 31, 1975

    Todor Zhivkov, Reports to Bulgarian Communist Party Politburo on his Visit to Cuba

    Todor Zhivkov reports his impressions of his recent visit to Cuba. The report is a rough outline of topics ranging from advancements in the Cuban revolution since 1959 to prospective ways to improve Bulgarian-Cuban relations. In the report Zhivkov presents his assessment of the Cuban Communist Party congress. Party documents show a maturing understanding of Marxism-Leninism and a new clarity in the Cuban Communist Party as a whole. Zhivkov’s report includes examples of Cuba’s self-criticism and Zhivkov’s own criticism of Cuba’s leadership. Some topics of discussion include: cultural and economic specialist exchanges, the price of sugar, Cuba’s increased collaboration with Soviet Union and other socialist nations, and economic subsidies and aid.

  • March 11, 1976

    Minutes of the Meeting between Todor Zhivkov and Fidel Castro in Sofia

    Conversation for the record between Zhivkov and Castro during a four-day-long state visit of the Cuban leader to Bulgaria. Among the main issues discussed was the state of economic development in both countries, their relations with Albania, China, Romania and Yugoslavia; the Cuban foreign policy in Africa and the Caribbean; the civil war in Angola; the battle for the Third World.

  • April 26, 1979

    USSR Embassy in Cuba, "Informational Letter on Contemporary Cuban-American Relations"

    The Soviet Embassy in Havana gives an overview of the latest developments in US-Cuban relations. While steps towards a rapprochment have been undertaken, both sides are deadlocked on the issue of Cuba's military involvement in Africa.

  • June 25, 1979

    Soviet Ambassador to Cuba V.I. Vorotnikov, Memorandum of Conversation with Fidel Castro

    Memorandum of conversation between Soviet Ambassador Vorotnikov and Fidel Castro

  • September 27, 1979

    Minutes of CPSU CC Politburo Meeting (excerpt)

    Minutes of the CPSU CC Politburo Meeting. Carter has appealed to the Soviet Union regarding the issue of the presence of a military brigade in Cuba. The meeting attendees discuss a rough draft response and offer corrections.

  • September 27, 1979

    CPSU CC Politburo Decision with Brezhnev-Carter Hotline Correspondence

    Telegram, in response to the President of the USA, regarding the issue of the Soviet military personnel in Cuba

  • December 27, 1979

    Conversation between Soviet Ambassador to Cuba A.S. Seletskii and Jose Antonio Arbesu, Head of the USA sector of the Cuban Communist Party Central Committee

    Memorandum of conversation between Soviet Ambassador to Cuba and Head of the USA sector of the Cuban Communist Party Central Committee about the US-Cuban relations

  • May 25, 1980

    Transcript of Conversation between Cuban Premier Fidel Castro and East German leader Erich Honecker, Havana, (excerpt)

    Memorandum of conversation between Castro and Honecker regarding the bilateral relations, US-Cuban relations, and Soviet-Cuban relations

  • November 23, 1981

    Transcript of Meeting between US Secretary of State Alexander M. Haig, Jr., and Cuban Vice Premier Carlos Rafael Rodriguez, Mexico City

    Memorandum of conversation taken during the secret meeting between Alexander Haig and Cuban Vice Premier arranged by Carlos R. Rodriguez, Mexican Foreign Minister, in Mexico City

  • June 20, 1990

    From the Diary of Yu.V. Petrov: Report on a Conversation with Fidel Castro

    Castro discusses ways to strengthen relations between Cuba and the Soviet Union, as well as the possible normalization of relations between Cuba and the United States. They also discuss the situation in El Salvador and Nicaragua.

  • August 31, 1990

    From the Diary of Yu. V. Petrov, Record of a Conversation with the Deputy Chairman of the State Council and the Council of Ministers of Cuba, Carlos Rafael Rodriguez

    Record of conversation between Soviet Ambassador Petrov and Cuban Deputy Chairman Carlos Rafael Rodriguez, in regard to the Cuban trade imbalance with the Soviet Union. Rodriguez notes that Cuba would like to see a decrease in the number of Soviet officials present in the country, and argues that the USSR should be buying Cuban sugar above world market prices as the EEC does. The Soviet side responds that it is supportive of many of these ideas, but that it would take a complete restructuring of the Cuban economy to achieve these aims.