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Digital Archive International History Declassified

November 03, 1977

REPORT, PERMANENT MISSION OF HUNGARY TO THE INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS IN VIENNA TO THE HUNGARIAN FOREIGN MINISTRY

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    The DPRK's representation to Austria and Czechoslovakia is under-staffed and has little knowledge of international organizations. They are further impeded by language barriers. Hungary encourages an upgrade in representation.
    "Report, Permanent Mission of Hungary to the International Organizations in Vienna to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry," November 03, 1977, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, MOL, XIX-J-1-j ENSZ, 1977, 154. doboz, V-73, 005665/1977. Obtained and translated for NKIDP by Balazs Szalontai. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/110130
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    https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/110130

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The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea has a representation in Vienna, headed by Comrade Ri Won-beom [Ri Won Bom]. Its competence covers not only Austria but also Czechoslovakia.

It is obvious that the small, 3-person representation is seriously overloaded with [maintaining] bilateral relations. They cannot participate in every fraternal discussion related to the IAEA. Usually they do so only on the occasion of major IAEA events, e.g., before important board-meetings or general assemblies. On such occasions Comrade Dr. Choe Hak-geun [Choe Hak Gun], the Director of a major department of the DPRK National Commission of Atomic Energy, usually visits Vienna.

Considering that the employees of the DPRK representation have language problems as well—they know only German—on the occasion of friendly conversations, we repeatedly offered to help them with anything or inform them about anything. We repeated that [offer] several times during socialist receptions.

Their statements revealed that they are not sufficiently familiar with international organizations, and thus, understandably, it is difficult for them to ask questions.

On the basis of these facts, all I can propose in reply to your instruction is that the DPRK should upgrade its representation by engaging an employee who would deal with UN organizations and socialist coordination and who would be sufficiently competent linguistically. On the grounds of your request, we will naturally assist them in this issue as much as possible.

Zoltán Fodor

Ambassador