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Digital Archive International History Declassified

June, 2007

THE LUCY CASE. FOLDER 74. THE CHEKIST ANTHOLOGY.

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    In this entry, Mitrokhin draws upon KGB files to describe Erlich Vranni “Lucy” (b. 1948), a native of Bern, Switzerland and the secretary of the Swiss Ambassador to Indonesia from 1969-1970. Beginning in January 1970, Lucy collaborated with Sergei Nikolayevich Argunov, an agent within the KGB’s branch in Jakarta, Indonesia.
    "The Lucy Case. Folder 74. The Chekist Anthology.," June, 2007, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, Contributed to CWIHP by Vasili Mitrokhin. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/110791
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[Translation unavailable. See original. Detailed summary below.]

In this entry, Mitrokhin draws upon KGB files to describe Erlich Vranni "Lucy" (b. 1948), a native of Bern, Switzerland and the secretary of the Swiss Ambassador to Indonesia from 1969-1970. Beginning in January 1970, Lucy collaborated with Sergei Nikolayevich Argunov, an agent within the KGB's branch in Jakarta, Indonesia. Argunov worked undercover in Indonesia as a correspondent for a Moscow radio station.

According to the entry, Lucy showed support for the KGB's branch in Jakarta and displayed much affection for Russian people, history, literature and culture. Mitrokhin has recorded that Lucy had become an avid reader of works by Dostoevsky, Chekov, and Turgenev. While working for the KGB, Lucy transmitted copies of three letters, prepared by the Swiss Embassy and intended for Renault Hauser at the Austrian Embassy, Susan Kelly at the Canadian Embassy, and May Menzis, personal secretary of the British Ambassador.

Mitrokhin's summary of KGB documents indicates that Lucy was captivated by the secretive nature of the KGB which made life "more interesting." Lucy was rewarded 200 dollars for fulfilling her duties. According to the account, Lucy often mentioned to her colleagues that "she did her work not for the sake of earning money, but rather for the sake of being well-treated by the agency." The account also affirms that Lucy did not embrace a given political belief system, and was indifferent to religion.

KGB sources, as described by Mitrokhin, state that in September/October 1970, Lucy temporarily worked at a consulate in Saigon. She subsequently returned to Switzerland where she awaited a new assignment. The account mentions that Lucy refused to meet with other KGB agents during her stay in Switzerland, and that Sergei Argunov was sent to Bern in January/February 1971 to reestablish his ties with Lucy. Argunov was able to persuade Lucy to continue collaborating with other KBG agents in London/Canada. During their rendezvous, Argunov gave Lucy 500 Swiss francs. Nonetheless, according to Mitrokhin's account, Lucy's mission to Canada did not come to fruition and all ties between Lucy and the KGB were lost in 1971. There was unconfirmed evidence that Lucy went to the United States where she reestablished her contact with the KGB.



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