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Digital Archive International History Declassified

August 13, 1955

CABLE FROM THE CHINESE FOREIGN MINISTRY TO WANG BINGNAN, 'POSSIBLE ATTITUDES OF THE OTHER PARTY AT THE SIXTH MEETING'

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    The Chinese Foreign Ministry instructed the Chinese delegation how to respond to different attitudes the US delegation might have in the next meeting.
    "Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry to Wang Bingnan, 'Possible Attitudes of the Other Party at the Sixth Meeting'," August 13, 1955, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, PRC FMA 111-00016-16, 66-67. Translated by Yafeng Xia. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/110861
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[To] Ambassador Wang Bingnan:

It is likely that after our first speech (the text of speech has been sent), the other party might still insist on its position from the fifth meeting; that is, asking us to release its nationals. He will not express his view if we do not do as requested. Under such circumstance, we must point out we have made an effort. The other party’s position will not help and we will ask him to consider our way. The other possibility is that the other party says that the draft agreement is okay, but needs to get our notice [of releasing American nationals] before it can enter into concrete discussion with us. At this point, we have to insist on our position and urge the other side to reconsider. Under these two circumstances, we should not relent, and it is impossible to reach an agreement. There is a third possibility, that is, if the other side indicates willingness to accept our draft agreement, or proposes cosmetic revisions. Under such circumstances, we should inform the other party that the Chinese government has completed its review of the following cases:

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Foreign Ministry

1:00 a.m., 13 August 1955