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Digital Archive International History Declassified

August 15, 1955

CABLE FROM THE CHINESE FOREIGN MINISTRY TO WANG BINGNAN, 'INSTRUCTIONS AND TEXT OF SPEECHES AT THE SEVENTH MEETING'

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    The Chinese Foreign Ministry estimated the issues that the US would raise in the next meeting, including the wording in the agreement and whether to issue a joint statement or separated ones, and instructed Chinese Representative Wang Bingnan the proper responses.
    "Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry to Wang Bingnan, 'Instructions and Text of Speeches at the Seventh Meeting'," August 15, 1955, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, PRC FMA 111-00017-04, 14-15. Translated by Yafeng Xia. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/110864
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[To] Ambassador Wang Bingnan:

We have learned about the sixth meeting and the speeches of the other party.

1. In accordance with our observation of the other party at the sixth meeting, he may not insist that we release American nationals before entering into a discussion on the draft agreement at the seventh meeting. But on the other hand, if the other side could get our notification of releasing its nationals, the other side won’t reach an agreement with us on a draft agreement. At the seventh meeting, the other side may follow our example from the sixth meeting, placing nationals in both countries on the same footing. Then, the US side may propose its revision to the draft agreement and enter into concrete discussions. For the seventh meeting, we should try to discuss the draft agreement and reach an agreement (even if it is only tentative).

You may ask the other side to speak first at the seventh meeting. It seems that the revised draft of the other party should include the following three points: (a) the issue of civil and criminal cases; (b) the issue of representation [by a third government]; (c) the issue of publication of the draft simultaneously or separately. Regarding these three issues, we must stick to our original position…Eventually we may compromise on the second and the third issues in exchange for the other side’s concession on the first issue. We cannot make concessions on civil cases. We may agree to delete the sentence regarding “representation by the other government.” We must fight for the publication of the draft agreement simultaneously. We may agree to the publication separately, but should not relent too early. We should not relent if an accord could not be reached on an agreed announcement, even at the seventh meeting.

2. In view of the intense counterpropaganda in the US over the issue of the eleven released US personnel, you should warn the US side that if they want to stir up trouble over this issue, we have more grievances over the issue of the POWs. We hope that they will behave themselves.

3. According to Reuters at Geneva, we will propose two issues under Agenda II, which we have internally decided but have not officially announced. Please investigate who leaked the information and whether it was from our side, from Menon, or just pure speculation. In short, you should be on the alert and maintain secrecy.

Ministry of Foreign Affairs

15 August 1955