Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

April 30, 1980

CIPHERED TELEGRAM NO. 68, EMBASSY OF HUNGARY IN PAKISTAN TO THE HUNGARIAN FOREIGN MINISTRY

This document was made possible with support from the Carnegie Corporation

CITATION SHARE DOWNLOAD
  • Citation

    get citation

    Short analysis of Pakistani President Zia-ul-Haq's upcoming visits to China and North Korea, with discussion of the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and Pakistan's nuclear program.
    "Ciphered Telegram No. 68, Embassy of Hungary in Pakistan to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry," April 30, 1980, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, Hungarian National Archives (Magyar Országos Levéltár, MOL). XIX-J-1-j Pakistan, 1980, 113. doboz, 119-130, 003408/1980. Obtained and translated for NPIHP by Balazs Szalontai. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/111945
  • share document

    https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/111945

VIEW DOCUMENT IN

English HTML

The preliminary evaluation of the ambassadors of the closely cooperating socialist countries on President Zia-ul-Haq's visit to China and [North] Korea, which is about to take place between May 2nd and 11th:

1.) The visit has been preceded by extensive political preparations. On the 19th of this month, the Pakistani side gave an essentially negative reply to the Soviet leaders' message with regard to Afghanistan. Citing the resolutions of [the Organization of] the Islamic Conference, they inflexibly cling to their previous standpoint; they are not willing to negotiate until the complete withdrawal of Soviet troops, and not with B. Karmal's government, anyway. In Zimbabwe, President Zia-ul-Haq made statements that pleased the Chinese. The closure of the Pakistani embassy in Vietnam can also be evaluated as a gesture toward China. The reason of [Zia's] haste is that he seeks to negotiate with the Chinese leaders before Huang Hua's planned visit to India.

2.) Of the subjects to be discussed, Pakistan's demand to conclude a treaty of peace and friendship is likely to take priority. Pakistan's effort to achieve cooperation in the nuclear field can be regarded as an issue of special importance. The process of making preparations for an atomic explosion is being hampered by new technical problems. Both in terms of domestic and foreign policy, conditions are unfavorable for carrying out an atomic explosion. For this reason, the Pakistani side presses for a joint explosion to be carried out at a Chinese test site. The third main theme encompasses the questions of military cooperation. The Pakistani side demands that not only arms but also defense factories should be provided free of charge.

3.) The purpose of [Zia's] visit in the DPRK is to further intensify the supply of arms, a process that started earlier.

4.) The fact that the Chinese side also raised India's hopes for an opportunity to normalize relations plays a substantial role in the Chinese reactions to the Pakistani ideas. This might actually set limits to the fulfillment of the exacting Pakistani demands.

– 68 – F. ȓ