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Digital Archive International History Declassified

October 01, 1982

CIPHERED TELEGRAM NO. 192, EMBASSY OF HUNGARY IN INDIA TO THE HUNGARIAN FOREIGN MINISTRY

This document was made possible with support from the Carnegie Corporation

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    Short evaluation of Indira Gandhi's visit to the Soviet Union in 1982 and its objectives.
    "Ciphered Telegram No. 192, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry," October 01, 1982, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, Hungarian National Archives (Magyar Országos Levéltár, MOL). XIX-J-1-j India, 1982, 60. doboz, 60-13, 005793/1982. Obtained and translated for NPIHP by Balazs Szalontai. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/111950
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Political observers evaluate Indira Gandhi's visit in the Soviet Union by comparing it with the visit the prime minister paid to the USA. They are in agreement in that the purposes of the two high-level visits were entirely different. While her visit in the USA was aimed at “bridge-building,” she visited the Soviet Union in order to stabilize relations. She achieved her objectives in both countries. It is regarded as natural that her negotiations with the Soviet leaders were unequivocal in most questions, the few disagreements which were known did not cause problems. The joint communiqué – to which observers attribute special importance, because it covered the issue of disarmament, the necessity of détente, the situation in Asia, the question of the Indian Ocean and the role of the non-aligned countries at unusually great length – accurately reflects the purpose and result of the visit. They are of the opinion that all this happened at Soviet initiative, with the aim of enabling India to take sufficient advantage of the non-aligned summit to be held in Delhi in March 1983.

Indian official circles consider the visit very successful, concerning both the evaluation of international questions and the further development of bilateral relations.

The press has covered the visit widely and in general positively; they publish a particularly high number of articles on the issue of what sort of decision the Indian government will make with regard to the high-capacity nuclear power plant offered by the Soviet Union, which is considered crucial from the perspective of future cooperation, too.

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