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Digital Archive International History Declassified

July 28, 1983

CIPHERED TELEGRAM NO. 152, EMBASSY OF HUNGARY IN THE SOVIET UNION TO THE HUNGARIAN FOREIGN MINISTRY

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    Report on an unofficial visit by Rajiv Gandhi, Indira Gandhi's son and future Prime Minister of India, to the Soviet Union in 1983.
    "Ciphered Telegram No. 152, Embassy of Hungary in the Soviet Union to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry," July 28, 1983, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, Hungarian National Archives (Magyar Országos Levéltár, MOL). XIX-J-1-j India, 1983, 60. doboz, 60-103, 004413/2/1983. Obtained and translated for NPIHP by Balazs Szalontai. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/111951
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At the MID's [Ministry of Foreign Affairs] South Asia department, an official of our embassy was told that Rajiv Gandhi had been invited for an unofficial visit by a parliamentary group of the Supreme Soviet, and that his principal host was Comrade Shitikov.

They regard Rajiv Gandhi as a person who in the long run might play an important role in India's foreign policy, and for this reason, the primary purpose of the visit was to make him familiar with Soviet realities and the current state of bilateral relations. No concrete issues were raised during the talks.

The Soviet hosts laid great stress on the fact that this was the Indian leader's first independent trip abroad.

Rajiv Gandhi was received by Gromyko, Ustinov, Ponomarev, Kuznetsov, Arkhipov, Patolichev, Ryabov (SCEER [State Commission of External Economic Relations]), and Comrade Mishin, the first secretary of the Komsomol.

During his trip to the countryside, he visited the aircraft factory in Voronezh and the nuclear power plant which currently serves as a model for the similar Soviet facilities to be built in the future and in which foreign technical experts are also being trained. In Novosibirsk, he visited the institute of nuclear physics in order to become familiar with the practical results achieved in [Soviet] applied research, in which India shows increased interest.

The Soviet side regards Rajiv Gandhi's visit as positive. They highlight his utterances on general international issues and on the necessity of developing Soviet-Indian relations even further. In the presence of the representatives of both the Soviet and the Indian press, the Indian politician also positively evaluated his visit in the Soviet Union.

– 152 – János Barabás ȓ