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Digital Archive International History Declassified

March 28, 1984

CIPHERED TELEGRAM NO. 88, EMBASSY OF HUNGARY IN INDIA TO THE HUNGARIAN FOREIGN MINISTRY

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    Report on frictions between the Soviet Union and Indian political leaders.
    "Ciphered Telegram No. 88, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry," March 28, 1984, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, Hungarian National Archives (Magyar Országos Levéltár, MOL). XIX-J-1-j India, 1984, 66. doboz, 60-103, 002450/1/1984. Obtained and translated for NPIHP by Balazs Szalontai. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/111953
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The informant mentioned in Telegram No. 87 [sent March 27 1984] summarized the additional factors which disturb the Indian-Soviet relationship as follows:

1.) Indira Gandhi has not forgotten that in the aftermath of her downfall in 1977, she was completely “written off” by the Soviets who broke off all relations with her.

2.) The politicians of the Indian government party are offended that the Soviets maintain relations with them only as long as they are in high positions, or as long as the Soviets have a stake in that relationship.

3.) Soviet policy in India “has a couple of irons in the fire.” The government is aware that the Soviet organs maintain contacts with the leaders of every political party, and they even frequently resort to financial influence.

4.) Middle-level Soviet leaders, while dealing with their Indian partners, adopt such an attitude as if the Soviet Union had India fully in its pocket, as if it were India's “big brother.”

5.) The Soviet Union is unwilling to provide [India] with its most up-to-date achievements in sciences, engineering, and industrial technology.

6.) The representatives of numerous Soviet foreign trade organs are very corrupt. Among Indians, [their involvement in] the rice, tobacco, and tea rackets is well known.

The informant asked us to assist “those Indian political circles who are well-disposed towards the Soviet Union” by informing the Soviet comrades about these affairs, too, in an appropriate form. In the informant's view, these problems might, sooner or later, seriously damage the relationship of the two countries unless they are remedied in time.

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