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Digital Archive International History Declassified

May 14, 1977

TELEGRAM 066595 FROM THE ROMANIAN EMBASSY IN PYONGYANG TO THE ROMANIAN MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS

This document was made possible with support from the ROK Ministry of Unification, Leon Levy Foundation

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    The Romanian Embassy in Pyongyang reports to the Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs on the US troop withdrawal plan from South Korea and South Korea's emphasis on international support for continued US military presence on the Korean peninsula.
    "Telegram 066595 from the Romanian Embassy in Pyongyang to the Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs," May 14, 1977, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, Archive of the Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Folder 933/1977, Issue 220/H: Partial US troop withdrawal from South Korea – Discussions regarding the reunification of the two countries, January – October 1977. Obtained and translated for NKIDP by Eliza Gheorghe. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/114871
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TELEGRAM 066595

To: the Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs

From: the Romanian Embassy in Pyongyang

Date: May 14, 1977

Classification: Secret

In view of the partial US troop withdrawal from South Korea, the US-ROK talks for establishing a withdrawal plan of American ground troops within 4-5 years—except for strategic missile bases and air troops—will begin on May 24th in Seoul. The ROK is to receive all equipment and armament from the withdrawn troops; the plan for modernizing the South Korean army will be revised.   

Concurrently, safety measures for the prevention or elimination of a potential conflict in the Korean Peninsula will be discussed.

In addition to promises made by the US that American troops stationed in Japan will intervene in Korea in case of emergency, envoys from Seoul want to receive guarantees from Japan that it will contribute its land, naval, and air forces, when necessary, in order to maintain security on the Peninsula.

South Korean comments on the matter suggest a tendency on the ROK’s behalf to delay and ultimately extend the withdrawal deadline of American troops.

Radio stations in Seoul repeatedly note that Japan, the PRC, and the USSR, in the interest of maintaining peace in the region, disagree with a total and unwarranted US troop withdrawal from South Korea.

Hitherto, Pyongyang has not commented on the meeting in Seoul on May 24.

Signed: D. Popa