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Digital Archive International History Declassified

October 26, 1962

LETTER FROM YUGOSLAV PRESIDENT TITO TO BRAZILIAN PRESIDENT GOULART

This document was made possible with support from the Leon Levy Foundation

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    Yugoslav President Tito is writing to Brazilian President Goulart discussing concerns over the situation in Cuba. In Tito's opinion, the best course of action is for direct negotiations to continue in the UN.
    "Letter from Yugoslav President Tito to Brazilian President Goulart," October 26, 1962, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, Archivo Histórico Diplomático Genaro Estrada, Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores, Mexico City. Obtained by James Hershberg, translated by Eduardo Baudet and Tanya Harmer. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/115245
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LETTER DIRECTED BY THE PRESIDENT OF YUGOSLAVIA TO PRESIDENT GOULART ON THE DATE 26 OCTOBER 1962

The critical situation that, with a rapidity that is causing worry, develops around Cuba impels me to address this brief message to you. I share general worries and, encouraged by the activity of many countries, particularly in the United Nations, I have already made, in name of the government and the people of Yugoslavia, a declaration asking that, with the object of overcoming the current bitter stage, the disputing countries begin direct negotiations in keeping with the principles of the United Nations. We received with a certain relief the first results of the efforts already realized in the United Nations and we share the determination of the Secretary General U Thant in the sense that the tension might be lessened by means of direct negotiations. We consider, however, that, as much as for the success of the current initial conversations as for the success of the previous efforts destined to put an end to crisis, it is also necessary to abolish the quarantine and suspend the transportation of offensive arms to Cuba, and as a result encourage by way of a positive contribution U Thant’s effort so that at the least it can be initiated even though it may be a provisional arrangement in this respect.

Our constant point of view, along with numerous other countries of the world – as far as has become clear in the course of this grave crisis – is that the United Nations is the instrument that in the present situation can and should act with most efficiency to put an end to the crisis. As such we completely support the efforts that have been made at the United Nations by countries that do not belong to any bloc and other countries, as well as the indefatigable effort by U Thant. Even so, in the case that, as unfortunately has occurred with frequency in the past, the Security Council finds itself paralyzed and shows itself unable to undertake adequate action, it will be, as everything makes us believe, indispensible to immediately move this serious dispute to the General Assembly.

In my opinion in the present serious moment it would be very useful for the leaders of countries that do not belong to blocs and that are independent to assert their personal influence by means of messages addressed to the Presidents of the Security Council and the General Assembly. As far as I am concerned I have the intention of doing this as soon as possible.

I ask that you excuse me for the liberty that I have taken and for the brevity of this message, which is the consequence of the seriousness of the situation and its urgent character.

For my part, I would be very grateful to receive any of your suggestions or opinions in respect to the meaning and content of any subsequent action.

Cordially yours.

Joseph Broz Tito.