Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

October 27, 1962

TELEGRAM FROM YUGOSLAV EMBASSY IN HAVANA (VIDAKOVIć) TO YUGOSLAV FOREIGN MINISTRY

This document was made possible with support from the Leon Levy Foundation

CITATION SHARE DOWNLOAD
  • Citation

    get citation

    Ambassador Vidaković describes a meeting with Cuban President Osvaldo Dorticos. Dorticos is convinced that the American attack and invasion will happen later that night.
    "Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana (Vidaković) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry," October 27, 1962, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, Archive of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (AMIP), Belgrade, Serbia, PA (Confidential Archive) 1962, Kuba, folder F-67. Obtained by Svetozar Rajak and Ljubomir Dimić and translated by Radina Vučetić-Mladenović. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/115462
  • share document

    https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/115462

VIEW DOCUMENT IN

English HTML

Ministry of Foreign Affairs, FPRY

Sending: Havana

Received: 27.X 62. at 00.30

No. 229

Taken into process: 27.X 62. at 00.30

Date: 27.X 1962

Completed: 27.XI 62. at 08.00

Telegram

15

Very urgent

TO THE MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS

For the President [Tito], [Foreign Minister] Koča [Popović].

Visited [Cuban President Osvaldo] Dorticos at 3 PM. At 2 PM they received information that they would be attacked by the US. Expect the attack during that night. Very convinced that [the] Pentagon prevailed and the attack was inevitable. He said there would be a great surprise if the attack could be avoided tonight.

American planes fly over many sites ruthlessly photographing again the whole territory. Consider the attack to begin with classical weapons focusing at first only on bases.

Informed him about the statement and the message of our President [Tito].1 Extremely grateful and wants me to convey that. They were ready for everything without any restrictions under one condition: to get international guarantees for their own security. Couldn’t accept disarmament without guaranties, not to become the victims of aggression in future. Any action, no matter the form, and initial steps from our side is looked forward to.

My comment. They are absolutely sure that the attack would be tonight. They are very upset and soft. I have an impression, according to Dorticos, that they were ready to accept many things that were out of discussion in the near past. If they overestimated, it’s difficult for me to judge because of the lack of the outside information, but it is the right moment to hold them to their word. I will be in permanent contact during the night with Dorticos’s office.

Asking for possible suggestions. Asking for keeping the connection open in the next 24 hours.

Vidaković

[1] Possibly a reference to Tito’s message to leaders of neutral (or neutral-leaning) countries, e.g., Tito to Brazilian President João Goulart, 26 October 1962, translation in the collection of Mexican documents on the Cuban Missile Crisis published elsewhere in this issue of the CWIHP Bulletin—ed.