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Digital Archive International History Declassified

October 29, 1962

TELEGRAM FROM YUGOSLAV EMBASSY IN HAVANA (VIDAKOVIć) TO YUGOSLAV FOREIGN MINISTRY

This document was made possible with support from the Leon Levy Foundation

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    Vidaković reports to the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry on the diplomatic efforts of many Cuban officials (Roa, Dorticos, etc.). Vidakovic is worried they might not be approaching the situation (the Cuban Missile Crisis) with the appropriate fervor, which might, he believes, lead to a hysterical over-reaction at some point.
    "Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana (Vidaković) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry," October 29, 1962, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, Archive of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (AMIP), Belgrade, Serbia, PA (Confidential Archive) 1962, Kuba, folder F-67. Obtained by Svetozar Rajak and Ljubomir Dimić and translated by Radina Vučetić-Mladenović and Svetozar Rajak. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/115469
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Ministry of Foreign Affairs, FPRY

Sending: Havana

Received: 29.XI 62. at 08.10

No. 235

Taken into process: 29.XI 62. at 09.15 Date: 29.X 1962

Completed: 29.XI 62. at 10.00

Telegram

14

To the Ministry of the Foreign Affairs

Koča.

Tonight [Sunday night, October 28] talked to [Cuban Foreign Minister Raúl] Roa at 20.00.

“We exist.” “They have to know that – this side, as well as the other side.” That’s why there is Fidel’s declaration. Our number 233. Khrushchev hasn’t informed us about his last message to Kennedy. We had been informed about the previous ones. That’s why we were late with this declaration. Your both suggestions were accepted immediately.

He says that they had finished with the editing of the response to U Thant when I talked to [Cuban President Osvaldo] Dorticos. To our suggestion they immediately included the invitation. They are grateful, considering that wise. They are satisfied that U Thant accepted it at once. Our suggestion for the necessity of coming up with one declaration, appeal, etc. was understood and immediately discussed, but they were anticipated by the events. He read me U Thant’s letter in which he announces his arrival with his assistants on Tuesday. He stays two days. The letter was written in very moderate way. Nothing concrete was mentioned. It is underlined that sovereignty of Cuba was undisputable, etc.

Roa has already prepared to go to the UNO [United Nations Organization]. His trip was put off until U Thant’s arrival.

They don’t know what the special envoy to the Brazilian president Goulart will bring.

In further talks he confirms that they didn’t have time to think about the Chinese and their stupidities. They received Nehru’s message concerning the conflict. They didn’t answer it.

Much talks on the topic “it’s hard to the small ones when the big ones are bargaining.” Nothing much.

He is asking us for permanent contact.

In my opinion, they are overestimating again. It seems to me that they believe that the worst has gone away. There is a fear for them not to be disappointed with the Russians and once again make sort of a hysterical move like it had been already done with this declaration. On your behalf, I have suggested to Roa the necessity of calm and cool reactions.

Tonight Raul Castro is giving a speech. We will report.