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Digital Archive International History Declassified

November 01, 1963

CABLE FROM DUTCH EMBASSY, WASHINGTON (VAN ROIJEN), 1 NOVEMBER 1963

This document was made possible with support from the Leon Levy Foundation

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    Van Roijen writes to Amsterdam from Washington on a meeting between him and U.S. Secretary of State Dean Rusk. Rusk says there are now no more Soviet military personnel stationed in Cuba, although there are still technicians and instructors remaining. The belief is those too will soon leave after training the Cuban forces has completed. Rusk notes the icy relations between Moscow and Havana now, notably regarding Castro's refusal to sign the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty.
    "Cable from Dutch Embassy, Washington (Van Roijen), 1 November 1963," November 01, 1963, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, National Archive, The Hague, Archives of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 2.05.118, inv. 28913. Obtained for CWIHP by Rimko van der Maar and translated for CWIHP by Bastiaan Bouwman. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/115709
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REFERENCE No. 7694

DATE OF DISPATCH: 1 November 1963

DATE OF RECEIPT: 2 November 1963

TO: Min[istry]. o[f]. F[oreign].A[ffairs]

FROM: Washington

SECRET

During my meeting with Rusk this morning he on being asked informed me that currently no military Soviet units remain in Cuba. There are still some technicians and instructors but the US believes that all combat units have departed. Over the past forty days two thousand Russians have left Cuba and the expectation is that the instructors will likewise leave as soon as the training is completed.

Rusk in this context noted the tense relationship between Moscow and Havana, among other things as a result of the refusal by Castro to sign the treaty regarding the suspension of test explosions, only a few days after Gromyko had informed Rusk that Cuba would indeed sign.

The secretary of state emphasized the highly confidential nature of the statements set out in the first paragraph of this message and I would request you to use these with utmost discretion.

Van Roijen 698.