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Digital Archive International History Declassified

September 08, 1980

HUNGARIAN EMBASSY IN PAKISTAN, CIPHERED TELEGRAM, 8 SEPTEMBER 1980. SUBJECT: PAKISTANI-DPRK AND PAKISTANI-JAPANESE RELATIONS.

This document was made possible with support from the ROK Ministry of Unification, Leon Levy Foundation

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    The telegram speaks on the current status of diplomatic relations between Pakistan and North Korea. Among the issues discussed are the Soviet invasion and occupation of Afghanistan (and North Korea's desire to remain neutral), and Japan's stance on the Afghanistan question.
    "Hungarian Embassy in Pakistan, Ciphered Telegram, 8 September 1980. Subject: Pakistani-DPRK and Pakistani-Japanese relations.," September 08, 1980, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, MOL, XIX-J-1-j Asia, 1980, 140. doboz, 203-10, 005421/1980. Translated for NKIDP by Balazs Szalontai. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/115822
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The visit of the DPRK deputy premier [in Pakistan] had been originally scheduled for this January, but it was canceled because of the conference of [the foreign ministers of the] OIC [Organization of Islamic Cooperation]. Prevented by the death of President Tito, President Zia [ul-Haq]’s visit in Korea could not take place, either. The purpose of this visit was to ensure the continuity of relations. The DPRK wishes to stay neutral in the Afghan question [emphasis in the original], and wants to maintain its earlier relations with both countries. Pakistan and Afghanistan have a common interest in resolving the disputed questions by joint efforts. The DPRK is generally opposed to the idea of placing this question on the agenda of international forums [emphasis in the original].

The most significant result of the visit of the Japanese foreign minister was the conclusion of aid [emphasis in the original] agreements. Despite the similarity of [Pakistani and Japanese] political views, it is remarkable that the two countries have different standpoints as far as their relations with India are concerned. Japan adopts a reserved attitude with regard to the military aid requested by Pakistan, and tries to persuade [Pakistan] to resolve its relations with India by means of negotiations. They adopt the same attitude toward the Afghan question.

137 – V.