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Digital Archive International History Declassified

June 08, 1979

HUNGARIAN EMBASSY IN CANADA, CIPHERED TELEGRAM, 8 JUNE 1979. SUBJECT: VIETNAMESE-DPRK RELATIONS.

This document was made possible with support from the ROK Ministry of Unification, Leon Levy Foundation

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    The increasingly dicey relations between North Korea and Vietnam are highlighted in this telegram. North Korea continues to side with China and Cambodia in Vietnamese policies, and is pushing for Vietnamese expulsion from the Non-Aligned Movement. Such acts are bringing Vietnam to the breaking point in its relations with North Korea, heralding a recall of its ambassador from Pyongyang.
    "Hungarian Embassy in Canada, Ciphered Telegram, 8 June 1979. Subject: Vietnamese-DPRK relations.," June 08, 1979, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, MOL, XIX-J-1-j Korea, 1979, 80. doboz, 81-1, 001791/1/1979. Translated by Balazs Szalontai. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/115837
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    https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/115837

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On June 6th, the Vietnamese ambassador said the following about the DPRK’s political attitude toward Vietnam:

  • For a long time, since the time of the war against the USA, the DPRK has shown an unfriendly attitude, and in recent times an attitude of open hostility, toward Vietnam.

It unequivocally supported China’s aggression against Vietnam, and ever since that time, it keeps taking sides with China against Vietnam, and acts likewise in practice, too.

  • It defended the regime of Pol Pot, and still supports its remnants, whereas it sharply attacks Vietnam.

It does its best to isolate Vietnam (and, together with it, Cambodia), and, if possible, achieve its expulsion from the Non-Aligned Movement. Most recently, the government of the DPRK also set the aim that the non-aligned countries should hold the conference scheduled for this year in Pyongyang, rather than in Havana.

  • For a very long time, Vietnam has tolerated the actions of the DPRK, and warned its leaders to cease their attacks, but to no avail.  
  • Vietnam cannot act in this manner any longer; it must inform its people about the real situation.

It is regrettable that they must take such a measure against a socialist country. There is no other alternative. At present the DPRK cannot be regarded as a socialist country.

They will probably recall their ambassador from Pyongyang, and they will also be compelled to take additional measures.  

120 – N.