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Digital Archive International History Declassified

June 13, 1957

CABLE FROM THE CHINESE FOREIGN MINISTRY, 'PREMIER ZHOU’S CONVERSATION WITH AMBASSADOR NEHRU'

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    Premier Zhou Enlai and Indian Ambassador Ratan Kumar Nehru exchanged views on Taiwan Incident and situation in West Asia.
    "Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Premier Zhou’s Conversation with Ambassador Nehru'," June 13, 1957, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, PRC FMA 110-00713-02, 7-19. Translated by Anna Beth Keim. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/116573
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Content: Premier Zhou’s Conversation with Ambassador Nehru

To the Chinese Embassy in India and Office of the Chargé D'Affaires in Britain:

On 8 June, Ambassador [Ratan Kumar] Nehru conveyed Premier [Jawaharlal] Nehru’s views on the “Two Chinas” to Premier Zhou:

Premier Nehru states that he has noted that China absolutely will not accept “two Chinas,” but he thinks that at present America is unlikely to take the line of “two Chinas,” because this runs counter to all of America’s policies, China would not agree [to it], and it would not help to ease the situation.

Ambassador Nehru also inquired about China’s view of the Taiwan Incident and Britain relaxing [restrictions] on trade with China.

Premier [Zhou] said, The Taiwan Incident reflected the Taiwanese people’s anti-American mood, [and] taught America a lesson; this incident also received moral support from some people in the Taiwanese government.  The disagreements between America and Jiang [Chiang] will continue to develop, but will not surface for the time being; [one] must give it time.  Britain’s lifting of the embargo reflected British-American disagreement.  But America is playing a double game; on the surface it opposes [lifting the embargo], while at the same time Eisenhower says that there is not much advantage to strengthening the embargo.  The issue will continue to develop, but not very quickly.  China does not plan to express an opinion on this.

Ambassador Nehru also conveyed Premier Nehru’s views on the situation in West Asia; [the Premier] thinks the situation in West Asia is extremely complicated.  The Premier usually speaks of West Asian national [liberation] movements as still lacking experience, [and says] they will take a tortuous path.  It would be beneficial if, when Premier Nehru returns from the Commonwealth Prime Ministers’ Conference, he could go to countries like Egypt and Syria and speak about national [liberation] movement experiences.  

The above is provided for reference.

Ministry of Foreign Affairs