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Digital Archive International History Declassified

July 10, 1979

NOTE FOR THE FILE, 'MAIN POINTS MADE BY PRESIDENT KIM IL SUNG IN THE MEETING WITH THE SECRETARY-GENERAL ON 3 MAY IN PYONGYANG'

This document was made possible with support from the ROK Ministry of Unification, Kyungnam University

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    Kim Il Sung claims that North Korea "would like to have economical, political and cultural cooperation with the Republic of Korea."
    "Note for the File, 'Main Points Made by President Kim Il Sung in the Meeting with the Secretary-General on 3 May in PyongYang'," July 10, 1979, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, “Democratic People's Republic of Korea,” Office of Secretary-General - Kurt Waldheim, S-0904-0025-13, United Nations Archives and Records Management Section (UN ARMS), New York, NY. Obtained for NKIDP by James Person. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/119193
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FMG/MM

cc: Mr. Perez de Cuellar

b/f: RA/AR

CONFIDENTIAL

NOTE FOR THE FILE:

Main points made by President Kim Il Sung

in the meeting with the Secretary-General

on 3May in PyongYang.

- The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea wants reunification independently (without outside interference) and by peaceful means. It is possible that two different social systems can exist within one nation. The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea has no intention whatsoever of invading the Republic of Korea or converting it into a socialist state.

- Even if Korea were unified it would never be a satellite of any other country but would always remain non-aligned and neutral.

- The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea would like to have economical, political and cultural cooperation with the Republic of Korea.

- The Republic of Korea and the US however, do not really want the nation to be reunified, rather they want to keep the country divided for the time being. In this, there is a basic difference of attitude on the two sides.

- The Korean case should not be compared with the case of Germany – a country defeated in World War II. Foreign troops are stationed in both German states, there are no foreign troops in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

- The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea wants a dialogue with the US. The Secretary-General has told the Foreign Minister that the Republic of Korea cannot be excluded from talks with the US. If the South agrees to such a procedure the North will not be opposed to it. But so far, the US has never even mentioned the possibility of tripartite talks, rather it has consistently refused to meet with representatives of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s position is to have first preliminary meetings with the US in which the procedure for further talks can be discussed.

- The replacement of the armistice agreement, however, is a matter to be solved with the US directly since the South is not a party to the agreement and has rejected it originally.

- He hopes that the Secretary-General will be able to assist the dialogue in particular with regard to contacts with the US.

- With regard to the Secretary-General’s concrete proposals (channel of communication, Observer)  his Government will study the matter in more detail and inform the Secretary-General of its position.

- Contact will be maintained through the Permanent Observer of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea in New York.

(signature)

FMG

10 July 1979