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Digital Archive International History Declassified

September 14, 1966

TELEGRAM FROM THE INDIAN EMBASSY IN MEXICO CITY ON SPEECH BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE LATIN AMERICAN DENUCLEARIZATION PREPARATORY COMMISSION

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    Alfonso Garcia Robles summarizes the main developments of the Third Session of the Preparatory Commission for the Denuclearization of Latin America and replies from non-member states.
    "Telegram from the Indian Embassy in Mexico City on Speech by the President of the Latin American Denuclearization Preparatory Commission," September 14, 1966, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, File No. F.W.II/102(56)/66. Obtained by Ryan Musto. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/133942
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Date: September 14, 1966

CONFIDENTIAL

Telegram No: MEX/162-1/66

FROM P. KUMAR, Third Secretary

TO: Shri V.M.M Nair, Jt. Secy (UN), MEA

ATTACHES “GIST OF THE SPEECH delivered by the President of the Latin American Denuclearization Preparatory Commission, Mr. Alfonso Garcia Robles, Deputy Minister of External Affairs, and President of the Mexican Delegation, 30th August, 1966

The president review briefly the main developments that took place after the conclusion on the 4th May, 1966, of the Third Session of the Preparatory Commission for the Denuclearization of Latin America. He observed that all the Member states have considered the Draft Treaty for the Denuclearization of Latin America to be satisfactory, reserving, however, the right to put forward suggestions for its improvement at the stage when the Commission directly, or through its working groups, dedicates itself to the task of giving a final form to the Treaty.

2. Regarding the Non-Member States contacted by the Negotiating Committee of the Commission in 1965, he observed that the replies sent by the five States present a positive balance. The Government of Netherland has consented to respect the same obligations regarding Suriname and Dutch West Indies as the Latin American countries may accept for the denuclearization of Latin America. The Government of France has made known, in unequivocal terms, of tis intention not to encourage in its territories in Latin America any development of nuclear activities of military character. The French Government has also communicated to the Commission that, in its territories in Latin America, it has no intention of making any nuclear experiments and that Space Centre in Guyana is only meant for testing Space Rockets and for launching satellites.

3. The British Government, while making a reference the proposal regarding “signature and adhesion, to the future Treaty, has stated that the British territories in Latin America do not find it inconvenient to become parties to the Treaty, provided its provisions are acceptable. Referring to another proposal, the British Government has stated that it “will not exclude the possibility of favoring a restricted zone which may not include certain States – even if they have great military importance – if the said restricted zone has reasonable perspectives of existing as a viable entity and particularly if it seems probably that it may provide a reasonable basis for building a comprehensive zone.” The Government of the United States has given a reply which can, no doubt, be considered as encouraging. Red China, as already intimated, has refused to commit herself to the proposed ban.

4. The Soviet Union has not sent any reply as yet. However, the President observed that the attitude of the Soviet Union regarding the denuclearization of Latin America should not be interpreted as negative. He noted that the Representative of the Soviet Union, while referring  to the existing project for the creation of denuclearized zones (amongst which Latin America was included), made the following statement at the meeting of the 18 Nations Disarmament Committee held on 2nd August:

“The Soviet Union believes in the creation of such denuclearized zones in different parts of the world, as the application of such measures will open the road to an effective limitation of the sphere, maintenance and use of nuclear weapons and may, therefore, diminish the dangers of a nuclear war and help to limit the armament race.”

5. He cordially welcomed the two new observers from Belgium and Finland who attended the meeting of the Prep Comm for the first time.