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Digital Archive International History Declassified

November 16, 1973

TELEGRAM FROM G.J. MALIK, INDIAN AMBASSADOR TO CHILE

This document was made possible with support from the Carnegie Corporation

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    Chile’s domestic situation after the military coup. The Indian embassy has not accepted any refugees and India is currently unpopular with the ruling Junta.
    "Telegram from G.J. Malik, Indian Ambassador to Chile," November 16, 1973, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, File No. WII/101/20/73 – Vol. II. Obtained by Ryan Musto. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/133965
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DATE: November 16, 1973

Tel: SANT/101/3/73

FROM: G.J. Malik, Ambassador to Chile

TO: Kewal Singh, Foreign Secretary, MEA

…As you will see there is a good deal of cooperation between Embassies in this humanitarian activity. Most ambassadors in Santiago are going all out to help refugees and induce the Chilean Government to respect human rights. Since I do not wish to saddle the Government of India with “asylees” – under International Law they have to be maintained by the receiving state and transported out of the country at its expense – I have been counting on the help and benevolence of my colleagues…

…India is unpopular with the Junta because we have accepted protection of interests of USSR and Czechoslovakia and have not recognized the Junta. Conditions in Santiago are abnormal and unusual. The British Ambassador said yesterday that the Vienna Convention may have to be re-written since the activities of the Junta and the Embassies in Santiago have driven a coach and four through the existing one. I am, of course, being careful, as you have advised but the Junta does not always listen to the advice of the Ministry of External Relations and resorts to curious antics.