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Digital Archive International History Declassified

October 22, 1945

TASS DIGEST DISTRIBUTED TO CDE. I.V. STALIN AND CDE. C.M. MOLOTOV, 'RADIO BROADCASTS; SADAK'S ARTICLE'

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    TASS reports on rumors of Stalin's illness in Congolese and Turkish newspapers as well as a Turkish analysis of Soviet politics.
    "TASS Digest Distributed to Cde. I.V. Stalin and Cde. C.M. Molotov, 'Radio Broadcasts; Sadak's Article'," October 22, 1945, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, RGASPI, f. 558, op. 11, d. 97, ll. 110-111. Contributed by Sergey Radchenko and translated by Gary Goldberg. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/134704
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[stamp: Secret Department of TASS]

Top Secret

RADIO BROADCASTS

Brazzaville. French language, 22 October, 2100. Transcript [protok. zapis’]

Agence France-Presse, referring to rumors circulating in the diplomatic circles of Washington, reports that Marshal Stalin’s state of health leaves much to be desired.

However, the Soviet Embassy in the US and the US State Department are refusing to comment on this report.

Ankara, Turkish language, 22 October, 2000. Transcript.

As is being reported from Washington Marshal Stalin is seriously ill. The Soviet Embassy in Washington is refusing to say anything about this.

Ankara, Turkish language, 22 October, 2115. Transcript.

They are reporting from Washington that Marshal Stalin intends to be unburdened from [his] main work. The main part of the work will be handed over to Molotov. Stalin won’t personally deal with details himself. Before the war Stalin headed the Communist Party and was its General Secretary. During the war Stalin headed the government and was the Commander-in-Chief. Rumors are circulating that the state of Stalin’s health has worsened. In one Washington report it points out that Stalin’s health is very bad. In the Soviet Embassy in Washington they have refrained from reporting anything about this.

Three copies printed

1 – to Cde. I. V. Stalin

2 – to Cde. V. M. Molotov

3 – to file

M. Nº 424 22 October 1945

PR Nº 498 ss

SADAK’S ARTICLE

ANKARA, 18 October (TASS). Sadak, the editor of the newspaper Aksam, has placed an article which, mentioning that 15 days have passed since the conclusion of the London Conference and that no report has been published about a resumption of talks, writes: “Soviet Russia is experiencing a moral crisis engendered by victory at the present time. Molotov is in a very difficult position. The Soviet propaganda, which wanted to depict Russia as the sole factor in the defeat of Germany and the surrender of Japan, has created a mood of pride and an immoderate appetite in influential circles. In the opinion of a fanatical Party group, Soviet Russia is a sufficiently powerful country to do and get everything that it wants; it should not yield to the Anglo-Saxons, it should resist to the end. It seems to us that Stalin, who is an outstanding government figure, is fighting against harsh elements in the Party. In the meantime Russia is doing what these elements want so it is not accused of harming their interests and the ideal of Communism. It is by no means seeking an agreement. The day will come when the tension reaches a maximum. Stalin will then ask others whether we should still resist, but this won’t be until each one and he are convinced of the need for compromise. Hence, with respect to Russia, a certain period of cooling should conclude. If Churchill were in power in Britain, which has permitted such a tense situation, then the British nation, letting itself be convinced by Russian propaganda, might think that the world was undermined by fascism. However, Eden would never have exhibited so much boldness as his successor, Bevin. Nevertheless, the British government does not know what the country’s public opinion might turn out to be in this area. There are people there who suppose that an agreement is still possible. Thus it follows that the Anglo-Saxons, in turn, need a period of heating to feel a threat, to fully recognize the truth and boldly switch to action”.

Three copies printed

1 – to Cde. I. V. Stalin

2 – to Cde. V. M. Molotov

3 – to file

Outgoing Nº 495s. 22 October 1945 [handwritten: PR]