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Digital Archive International History Declassified

December 27, 1961

CABLE FROM THE CHINESE EMBASSY IN NORTH KOREA, 'PREMIER KIM’S SON ON SOVIET-ALBANIAN RELATIONS'

This document was made possible with support from the Henry Luce Foundation

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    The Chinese Embassy in Pyongyang conveys comments that Kim Jong Il made to a Chinese student in the DPRK.
    "Cable from the Chinese Embassy in North Korea, 'Premier Kim’s Son on Soviet-Albanian Relations'," December 27, 1961, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, PRC FMA 106-00579-16, 58-59. Translated by Stephen Mercado. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/155255
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Ministry of Foreign Affairs Incoming Telegram

Classification: Urgent

From the Korea Desk

Foreign Ministry Incoming (61) Hai (537)

Premier Kim’s Son on Soviet-Albanian Relations

To the Foreign Ministry and the International Liaison Department, Central Committee, Communist Party of China:

Premier Kim’s eldest son, Kim Jong Il (a student in the Faculty of Economics, Kim Il Sung University), after class on the 23rd [23 December] visited our student Sui Xudong in his dormitory. Sui at that time was reading Premier Kim’s four major Workers Party of Korea (WPK) reports. On seeing Sui, Kim began talking excitedly, saying that Liao Chengzhi’s speech at the World Peace Council in Stockholm was great and powerful, and that we Koreans completely support it. Guinea’s speech also forcefully refuted the Soviet representative’s revisionism.  The Soviet representative was talking about how our age is the rocket age, but it was all revisionism, simply nonsense, and not in the spirit of the Moscow Declaration. Italian and Soviet revisionism were identical, talking about disarmament as central to world peace. They themselves are fine but do not know that in the world there are people in urgent need of picking up weapons.

As for the issue of the break in Soviet-Albanian relations, Kim said that the Soviet Union three times gave oral notice, that there is not a single reason for it, and that the editorial in Albania’s Zeri i Popullit [Voice of the People] was very powerful and backed with evidence. Albania is small, but doing well, and is fighting resolutely. It is too bad that Albania is so far from us. If it were geographically connected with China and Korea, how strong it would be! We have printed a pamphlet of over 200 pages of materials on everything about the Soviet-Albanian issue and given it to Party members to read. Our Party is now closely studying these materials and, at a certain time, we must relentlessly attack the revisionists. China has given much aid to Albania. [Abdyl] Kellezi has been to China. Honestly, China in recent years has suffered consecutive years of disasters and has troubles enough of its own, but still it aids Albania. Even greater has been China’s aid to [North] Korea:  in materials, lives, blood, in everything. The Korean Reference News published the World Peace Council speeches. Those of the Soviet Union, Italy, Vietnam, and Guinea took up one and a half pages, while that of Liao Chengzhi occupied six and a half pages.

[Chinese] Embassy in [North] Korea

27 December 1961

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