Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

February 21, 1990

ASSESSMENT BY THE AUSTRIAN FOREIGN MINISTRY, 'QUESTION OF GERMAN UNITY (STATE OF AFFAIRS, FEBRUARY 1990)'

CITATION SHARE DOWNLOAD
  • Citation

    get citation

    The assessment by the Austrian Foreign Ministry of German Unity is broken into five subject areas. The first part concerns the responsibility of the Four Powers to a new unified Germany. Next, West Germany's commitment to German unity dating as far back as 1970. The third portion outlines the border and security concerns of East and West Germany, as well as the Soviet Union, United States, Great Britain, and France. The next part is focused on economic recovery, specifically the lack of certain goods in East Germany (ie cars and houses). Finally, the report addresses the future developments of a unified Germany with an emphasis on the security of nearby states.
    "Assessment by the Austrian Foreign Ministry, 'Question of German Unity (State of affairs, February 1990)'," February 21, 1990, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, ÖStA, AdR, BMAA, II-Pol 1990, GZ. 22.17.01/35-II.1/90. Obtained and translated by Michael Gehler and Maximilian Graf. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/165720
  • share document

    https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/165720

VIEW DOCUMENT IN

English HTML

Question of German Unity (State of affairs, February 1990)

The establishment of German unity has become one of the most important themes of international politics. The German question could affect the progress of East-West relations and the dynamics of European integration. Whether, or to what extent it will affect the mentioned developments is not foreseeable at present.

1) The Responsibility of the 4 Powers:

While the former victorious powers, until the end of the 40s, held on to the idea of never letting Germany gain strength again (The protocols of the Yalta and Potsdam conferences speak of the “dismemberment of Germany”!), after the breakup of the victor coalition the “Convention on relations between the FRG and the three powers” (1952) stated that the three Western powers “retain their heretofore exercised or held rights and responsibilities with respect to Berlin and Germany as a whole, including the reunification of Germany and a peace settlement.”[1] The signatories will cooperate to realize their common goal of

“a unified Germany enjoying a liberal-democratic constitution, like that of the Federal Re-

public, and integrated within the European Community.”

On the occasion of the FRG’s accession to NATO, the three Western powers issued a statement that a “peace settlement for the whole of Germany, which is the basis for a lasting peace, remains a key policy objective.” This declaration was recognized by all NATO countries.

In the Four Powers Agreement on Berlin (1971)[2] the shared rights and obligations of the former victorious powers are set with respect to Berlin. The four powers have stationed forces in Berlin.

2) The FRG and German Unity:

In the preamble of the Basic Law the entire German people is called upon to accomplish “in free self-determination, the unification and freedom of Germany, in a united Europe.”[3]

In The Letter on German Unity (1970) the FRG affirmed its claim for reunification (“... to work for a state of peace in Europe, in which the German people regains its unity in free self-determination”).[4] Every FRG government must therefore feel obliged to work for the attainment of German unity.

Maintaining the claim for reunification is also found in additional clarifications of the FRG to the Treaty of Rome. (Reserve of possible GDR membership in the EC; intra-German trade; non-recognition of an East German citizenship).[5]

3) Border Issue and Safety Aspects:

The 3 Western powers have never considered definitive the Oder-Neisse border which resulted from Poland’s “westward shift,” they reserved the final determination of the geographical boundaries of a future unified Germany to be concluded by a peace treaty.

In the so-called Eastern Treaties,[6] the inviolability of the existing borders and renunciation of territorial claims is stipulated; at the same time, it was stated that the treaties reserving the final validation of these borders to a future peace treaty are still valid.

Uncertainty in the border issue is also triggered by the fact that the West German Federal Constitutional Court assumes in its judgment of 31.7.1973[7] the continuation of Germany within its borders of 31 December 1937 (thus including the former German Eastern territories).

Although the inviolability of borders is stipulated in the CSCE Final Act, the peaceful change of borders is not excluded.

For this reason, above all, the Soviet Union and Poland require border guarantees. The Western powers have a say due to the above-mentioned treaties.

The FRG accelerates the establishment of German Unity by recognizing that the historic opportunity may not be missed, as well as being under the pressure of the strong current of immigrants (1989 in total 340,000; Since the beginning of the current year 85,000). The Bonn government recognizes the Soviet Union’s security interests, and wants German unification to be embedded in the overall European development, but rejects a neutralization as proposed by the Soviet Union. Chancellor Kohl rejects a definitive recognition of the Oder-Neisse border for domestic political reasons (loss of voters to the Republicans, accusations of “selling off German soil”), and also out of consideration that declarations of borders could only be made by an all-German government.

There is general agreement that in the case of establishing German Unity and Germany remaining in the NATO alliance, the effective range of the Western alliance is not to be extended into the present-day territory of the GDR (i.e. no stationing of NATO-integrated units). It has not yet been clarified whether – at least for a transitional period – a part of the Soviet troops stationed in the GDR should remain there. Foreign minister Genscher indicated that the FRG would generally not be averse to accepting such Soviet security demands for a certain time.

Through the emerging German unity and the anticipated withdrawal of a large part of the Soviet units from the present GDR (approx. 365,000 men) the recently agreed maximum number of 195,000 troops stationed in Central Europe, for each the US and Soviet Union seems problematic (especially since Soviet units will also be withdrawn from Czechoslovakia). In the case of German unification this number must be revised.

Soviet Union: The Kremlin’s stance – probably due to awareness that the development towards German unity cannot be stopped – and is marked by major concessions in this question. The Soviet demands that the establishing of German Unity has to be embedded in the pan-European process and the desire for border guarantees remain in place.

Although, the original demand of neutralizing the whole of Germany was formally not entirely dropped (recent statements of Foreign Minister Shevardnadze),[8] the Kohl visit to Moscow[9] gives, however, the impression that the Soviet Union de facto does not intend to maintain this conditio sine qua non.

(Incidentally, in this context the question arises whether the Soviet security interests are not better accommodated in case of a strong anchoring of Germany in the Western alliance system (control function!) than in the case of a neutralization of Germany.)

Constantly new suggestions from Moscow (last: Only a peace treaty can determine the state of Germany in Europe) allow the conclusion that the Soviet leadership has yet to arrive at a definitive stance.

The stance of the western powers can be characterized as follows:

USA: Among the 3 Western powers, the most positive attitude towards German unity. Their main interest is the firm embedding of a united Germany in NATO. In contrast to Great Britain and France, fears about a future predominance of Germany in Europe or of negative consequences for the EC integration process recede.

Great Britain: A remarkable change of attitude in the face of this inevitable development. Yet warnings of Prime Minister Thatcher against proceeding too rapidly. British interest to have a say in the unification process as a victor of World War II. Unuttered fears of a German predominance in Europe; demand for recognition of Poland’s western border; rejection of a neutralization of Germany.

France: Fears that the unification process could slow the EC integration process and that the FRG now gives the former too much priority. Therefore, Mitterrand proposed to coordinate the creation of an EC monetary union with the creation of the German-German economic and monetary union. Insisting on a say in the German unification process. Discomfort about German predominance in Europe; demand for recognition of Poland’s western border. rejection of a neutralization of Germany.

4) The Economic aspects:

In his government declaration of 15. February 1990[10] Chancellor Kohl pointed out that the economic power of the GDR (approx. one fourth the population and about one third of the geographic extent of the FRG) corresponds approximately to the mid-sized Federal state Hesse; the newly created financial assets of the FRG in a single year correspond approximately with the entire savings portfolio of the GDR. If it were possible, to channel only a part of the annual West German capital exports (100 billion DM) into the GDR, this could already create strong economic impulses.

Despite the immense need of the GDR to catch up (in comparison to the West German standard they are lacking for example 3.6 million cars, 8 million telephone connections and 600 billion DM for housing space) the restoration of the GDR economy could be mastered in the medium term, particularly as the gross national product is 10 times that of the GDR and also other foreign investment would flow into an economic space that is to be reshaped according to market principles. For the sake of completeness, it should be noted that according to FRG think tanks, the combination of FRG capital and FRG know-how with the high educational standards of the GDR workforce could lead to a second German economic miracle.

The delivery obligations of the GDR (consumer goods) to the Soviet Union constitute a special problem. The FRG insinuated to be prepared to meet these obligations in case of Germany unification.

5) Possible Future Development:

The creation of Economic and Monetary Union should be speedily pushed forward after the GDR elections on 18 March 1990 (existing commissions already get to grips with certain groundwork).

In April 1990, a summit on the issue of German unification should take place, which will deal with the consequences for the Communities.[11]

The 4 victorious powers of World War II and both German states (formula “2 + 4”) have agreed at the “Open Skies” conference in Ottawa on 14 February 1990[12] to hold a conference (expected already in spring 1990)[13] to discuss the external aspects of establishing German unity, including questions of the security of neighboring states. Preparatory contacts at the level of government officials should be initiated shortly. At this juncture, it was simultaneously expressed implicitly that the arrangement of the inner aspects of Unity should be agreed by both German states themselves.

The result of the “2+4” conference could then be submitted to and sanctioned by a CSCE summit.

Plattner m.p.[14]

[1] The “Convention on relations between the Three Powers and the Federal Republic of Germany” signed on 26 May 1952 by the FRG and the Western Allies (France, the United Kingdom and the United States) replaced the previous occupation statute and obliged the signatories to the goal of unification of Germany and a peace settlement (for the whole of Germany). The treaty is also known under the names “General Agreement” and “Germany Treaty.” See printed in Auswärtiges Amt (ed.), Die Auswärtige Politik der Bundesrepublik Deutschland [= The Foreign Policy of the Federal Republic of Germany] (Cologne: Verlag Wissenschaft und Politik, 1972), 208–212. The treaty underwent several changes (for example the Protocol on the termination of the occupation regime of 23 October 1954) and went into effect in its final version after the NATO accession of the FRG on 5 May 1955. See Gesetz betreffend das Protokoll vom 23. Oktober 1954 über die Beendigung des Besatzungsregimes in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland vom 24. März 1955, BGBl. 1955 II, 213-214; Protokoll über die Beendigung des Besatzungsregimes in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland unterzeichnet in Paris am 23. Oktober 1954, BGBl. 1955 II, 215-252 und Bekanntmachung über das Inkrafttreten des Protokolls vom 23. Oktober 1954 über die Beendigung des Besatzungsregimes in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, BGBl. 1955 II, 628.

[2] The Quadripartite Agreement was signed by the four victorious powers (France, Great Britain, USSR, USA) on 3 September 1971, and went into effect on 3 June 1972, see Viermächte-Abkommen (mit den Anlagen I, II, III und V) vom 3. September 1971 (= Document 24), in Bundesministerium für innerdeutsche Beziehungen [= the Federal Ministry of Intra-German Relations] (ed.), Zehn Jahre Deutschlandpolitik. Die Entwicklung der Beziehungen zwischen der Bundesrepublik Deutschland und der Deutschen Demokratischen Republik 1969–1979. Bericht und Dokumentation [= Ten Years of Germany Policy. The development of relations between the Federal Republic of Germany and the German Democratic Republic from 1969 to 1979. Report and documentation] (Bonn: Bundesministerium für innerdeutsche Beziehungen, 1980), 158–162.

[3] The original English wording of the Preamble to the Basic Law, the founding document of the Federal Republic from 1949 reads: “Conscious of their responsibility before God and man, inspired by the determination to promote world peace as an equal partner in a united Europe, the German people, in the exercise of their constituent power, have adopted this Basic Law. Germans in the Länder of Baden-Württemberg, Bavaria, Berlin, Brandenburg, Bremen, Hamburg, Hesse, Lower Saxony, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, North Rhine-Westphalia, Rhineland-Palatinate, Saarland, Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt, Schleswig-Holstein and Thuringia have achieved the unity and freedom of Germany in free self-determination. This Basic Law thus applies to the entire German people.” The German version leaves room for various translations.

[4] The “Letter on German Unity” (1970), which held open the option to restore German unity within a European Peace Order, originated at least in part from pressure by the opposition and was handed over to the Soviet Foreign Ministry at the signing of the Moscow Treaty of August 12, 1970, see BGBl. 1972 II, 356.

[5] The Treaty of Rome establishing the European Economic Community (EEC) and the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom) was signed by representatives of the governments of Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, the Federal Republic of Germany, France and Italy on 25 March 1957. See BGBl. 1957 II, 753–1224. For the additional protocol on intra-German trade and connected problems see BGBl. 1957 II, 984–986.

[6] These include in particular the “Moscow Treaty” with the “Letter on German Unity” (1970), the “Warsaw Treaty” (1970), the Quadripartite Agreement on Berlin (1971), the Transitabkommen [Transit Agreement] (1971), the Verkehrsvertrag [Transit Treaty] (1972), the Basic Treaty (1972) and finally the “Prague Treaty” (1973). In the “Moscow Treaty” of 12 August 1970 the Federal Republic of German and the Soviet Union committed themselves to the easing of tensions and furthering of peace in Europe, to renounce the use of violence in disputes, and to recognize the existing European borders (Article 3). See Treaty between the Federal Republic of Germany and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, August 12, 1970 (Document 19), in: Bundesministerium für innerdeutsche Beziehungen [= Federal Ministry of Intra-German Relations] (ed.), Zehn Jahre Deutschlandpolitik [= Ten Years of Germany Policy], 156. Originally published in: BGBl. II, 1972, 354–355. Due to the wording of Article 3 of the Moscow Treaty, the Federal Republic of Germany handed over the “Letter on German Unity” at the signing, which held that “this treaty is not in conflict with the political objective of the Federal Republic of Germany to work toward a state of peace in Europe in which the German people in free self-determination regains its unity.” See: Letter on German Unity, 12 August 1970 (= Document 20), in: Bundesministerium für innerdeutsche Beziehungen [= Federal Ministry of Intra-German Relations] (ed.), Zehn Jahre Deutschlandpolitik [= Ten Years Germany Politics], 156–157. Originally published in: BGBl. II 1972, 356. The next step was the “Warsaw Pact” in which the Federal Republic de facto recognized the Oder-Neisse border. See: Treaty between the Federal Republic of Germany and the People’s Republic of Poland on the basis for normalization of their mutual relations of 7 December 1970 (“Warsaw Treaty”), BGBl. 1972 II, Nr. 27, 361. On September 3, 1971, after lengthy negotiations the Four Power Agreement on Berlin was signed. This stated that West Berlin is not part of the Federal Republic, but at the same time the Soviet Union recognized the close relationship between the Federal Republic and West Berlin and guaranteed not to interfere with these connections in the future.

The negotiation of the modalities was left to the two German states, see: Four Power Agreement (with the annexes I, II, III, IV), September 3, 1971 (Document 24), in: Bundesministerium für innerdeutsche Beziehungen [= the Federal Ministry of Intra-German Relations] (ed.), Zehn Jahre Deutschlandpolitik [= Ten Years of Germany policy], 158–162. After the Soviet Union had promised the unimpeded transit through the GDR to West Berlin in the Quadripartite Agreement, the negotiations on the transit agreement with the GDR were rapidly completed. See: Agreement between the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany and the Government of the German Democratic Republic concerning transit of civilian persons and goods between the Federal Republic of Germany and Berlin (West) 17 December 1971 (= Document 31) in: Bundesministerium für innerdeutsche Beziehungen [= Federal Ministry of Intra-German relations] (ed.), Zehn Jahre Deutschlandpolitik [= Ten Years of Germany Policy], 169–174. The so-called “Eastern treaties” were ratified by the Bundestag on 17 May 1972. The Quadripartite Agreement and the Transit Agreement entered into effect on 3 June 1972. On 26 May 1972 came already the signing of the “Transit Agreement”: agreement between the Federal Republic of Germany and the German Democratic Republic on questions of traffic (with protocol notes and correspondence and statements of the Secretary Bahr and Kohl) of 26 May 1972 (= Document 38), in: Bundesministerium für innerdeutsche Beziehungen [= Federal Ministry of Intra-German relations] (ed.), Zehn Jahre Deutschlandpolitik [= Ten years of Germany Policy], 183–188. On 8 November 1972, the “Basic Treaty” between the Federal Republic and the GDR, which regulated the future relationship of the two German states while maintaining the mutual positions in matters of principle, was initialed and signed on 21 December 1972. See: Treaty on basis of relations between the Federal Republic of Germany and the German Democratic Republic, 21 December 1972 See Vertrag über die Grundlagen der Beziehungen zwischen der Bundesrepublik Deutschland und der Deutschen Demokratischen Republik, 21. Dezember 1972 (= Dokument 53), in: Bundesministerium für innerdeutsche Beziehungen (ed.), Zehn Jahre Deutschlandpolitik, 205–208 (Erstveröffentlicht in: BGBl. II, 1973, 423–427), für die Briefwechsel, Erläuterungen und Erklärungen im Zusammenhang mit dem Vertrag siehe 208–213. With the “Prague Treaty” concluded on 11 December 1973 after tough negotiations, the relationship to Czechoslovakia was finally normalized.

[7] For the judgment of the Federal Constitutional Court on the Treaty on the Basis of Relations between the FRG and the GDR, see “Urteil des Bundesverfassungsgerichtes zum Vertrag über die Grundlagen der Beziehungen zwischen der Bundesrepublik Deutschland und der Deutschen Demokratischen Republik vom 31.7.1973” (= Document 68), in Zehn Jahre Deutschlandpolitik, 232–243.

[8] See Shevardnadze’s speech at the European Parliament in Brussels on 19 December 1989, in: Auswärtiges Amt der Bundesrepublik Deutschland (ed.), Umbruch in Europa. Die Ereignisse im 2. Halbjahr 1989. Eine Dokumentation [= Change in Europe. The Events in the Second Half of 1989. A Documentation], (Bonn: 1990), 146–153.

[9] Kohl met with Gorbachev in Moscow on 10 February 1990. Gorbachev at least did not contradict the rejection of neutrality for a unified Germany. See document 174, in Deutsche Einheit, 795–807, and documents 72 and 73, in Aleksandr Galkin/Anatolij Tschernjajew (eds.), Michail Gorbatschow und die deutsche Frage. Sowjetische Dokumente 1986–1991 (Munich: Oldenbourg, 2011), 317–337. The non-uniformity of the Soviet position becomes obvious in the remarks by Shevardnadze to Genscher. See Aufzeichnung des Dg 21, Höynck, vom 11. Februar 1990 über das Gespräch von Bundesaußenminister Genscher mit dem sowjetischen Außenminister Ševardnadze am 10. Februar 1990 in Moskau [Auszug] (= Dokument 20), in: Andreas Hilger (ed.), Diplomatie für die deutsche Einheit. Dokumente des Auswärtigen Amts zu den deutsch-sowjetischen Beziehungen 1989/90 [= Diplomacy for German Unity. Documents of the Foreign Office on German–Soviet relations in 1989–90] (Munich: Oldenbourg, 2011), 98–105, especially 102.

[10] Deutscher Bundestag. Stenografischer Bericht 197. Sitzung, Bonn, 15. Februar 1990, 15102–15110.

[11] The EC special summit was held in Dublin on 28 April 1990.

[12] The “Open Skies” conference of the NATO and Warsaw Pact foreign ministers was held in Ottawa from 12 to 14 February 1990. For the record on the NATO ministerial meeting on 13 February, see NATO-Ministerratstagung in Ottawa, 13. Februar 1990 (= Document 50), in Heike Amos/Tim Geiger (Bearb.), Die Einheit. Das Auswärtige Amt, das DDR-Außenministerium und der Zwei-plus-Vier-Prozess [= The Unity. The Foreign Office, the East German Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Two-Plus-Four process], ed. by Horst Möller/Ilse Dorothee Pautsch/Gregor Schöllgen/Hermann Wentker/Andreas Wirsching (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2015), 260–263.

[13] The meeting took place in Bonn on 5 May 1990 in Bonn, see document 268 in Deutsche Einheit, 1090–1094.

[14] Johann Plattner Head of the Department for Western and Northern Europe of the Political Section of the Austrian Foreign Ministry (1987–1993).

GERMAN (TRANSCRIPTION) HTML

Frage der deutschen Einheit (Stand Feber 1990)

Die Herstellung der deutschen Einheit ist zu einem der wichtigsten Themen der internationalen Politik geworden. Die deutsche Frage könnte Auswirkungen auf den Fortgang der Ost-West-Beziehungen und auf die Dynamik der europäischen Integration haben. Ob bzw. inwieweit sie die genannten Entwicklungen beeinträchtigen wird, ist zur Zeit nicht absehbar.

1)     Die Mitverantwortung der 4 Mächte:

Während die ehemaligen Siegermächte bis Ende der 40er-Jahre an der These festhielten, Deutschland nie mehr erstarken zu lassen (in den Protokollen über die Konferenzen von Jalta und Potsdam ist von der „Zerstückelung Deutschlands“ die Rede!), wurde nach dem Auseinanderbrechen der Siegerkoalition im „Vertrag über die Beziehungen zwischen der BRD und den 3 Mächten“ (1952) festgehalten, daß die drei Westmächte „Rechte und Verantwortlichkeiten in Bezug auf Berlin und auf Deutschland als ganzes, einschließlich der Wiedervereinigung Deutschlands und einer friedensvertraglichen Regelung weiter innehaben.[1] Die Unterzeichnerstaaten werden zusammenwirken, um ihr gemeinsames Ziel zu verwirklichen:

„Ein wiedervereinigtes Deutschland, das eine freiheitlich-demokratische Verfassung, ähnlich wie die Bundesrepublik, besitzt und das in die europäische Gemeinschaft integriert ist.“

Anläßlich des NATO-Beitritts der BRD gaben die 3 Westmächte eine Erklärung ab, wonach eine „friedensvertragliche Regelung für Gesamtdeutschland, welche die Grundlage für einen dauerhaften Frieden legen soll, ein wesentliches Ziel ihrer Politik bleibt“. Diese Erklärung wurde von allen NATO-Staaten anerkannt.

Im 4-Mächteabkommen über Berlin (1971)[2] werden die gemeinsamen Rechte und Verpflichtungen der ehemaligen Siegermächte im Bezug auf Berlin festgelegt. Die 4 Mächte haben in Berlin Streitkräfte stationiert.

2)     Die BRD und die deutsche Einheit:

In der Präambel zum Grundgesetz[3] wird das gesamte deutsche Volk aufgefordert, „in einem vereinten Europa in freier Selbstbestimmung die Einheit und Freiheit Deutschlands zu vollenden“.

Im Brief zur deutschen Einheit (1970) hat die BRD ihren Anspruch auf Wiedervereinigung bekräftigt („ … auf einen Zustand des Friedens in Europa hinzuwirken, in dem das deutsche Volk in freier Selbstbestimmung seine Einheit wiedererlangt“).[4]

Jede BRD-Regierung muß sich daher verpflichtet fühlen, auf die Erlangung der deutschen Einheit hinzuwirken.

Die Aufrechterhaltung des Wiedervereinigungsanspruchs findet auch in Zusatzerklärungen der BRD zu den Römer Verträgen ihren Niederschlag.[5] (Vorbehalt einer allfälligen DDR-Zugehörigkeit zur EG; innerdeutscher Handel; Nichtanerkennung einer ostdeutschen Staatsbürgerschaft)

3)     Grenzfrage und Sicherheitsaspekte:

Die 3 Westmächte haben die durch die „Westverschiebung“ Polens entstandene Oder-Neisse-Grenze nie als definitiv angesehen, sondern die endgültige Festlegung der geographischen Grenzen eines künftigen Gesamtdeutschlands einem abzuschließenden Friedensvertrag vorbehalten.

In den sogenannten Ostverträgen[6] werden die Unverletzlichkeit der bestehenden Grenzen und der Verzicht auf Gebietsansprüche stipuliert; gleichzeitig wird aber das Fortbestehen der Gültigkeit jener Verträge festgestellt, in denen die endgültigen Grenzen einem künftigen Friedensvertrag vorbehalten bleiben.

Unsicherheit in der Grenzfrage wird auch dadurch ausgelöst, daß das Bundesverfassungsgericht in seinem Urteil von 31.7.1973[7] vom Fortbestand Deutschlands in den Grenzen vom 31. Dezember 1937 (also inklusive der früheren deutschen Ostgebiete) ausgeht.

In der KSZE-Schlußakte wird zwar die Unverletzlichkeit der Grenzen festgelegt, Grenzänderungen auf friedlichem Wege werden aber nicht ausgeschlossen.

Aus diesem Grunde verlangen vor allem die Sowjetunion und Polen Grenzgarantien. Die Westmächte haben auf Grund der o.e. Verträge ein Mitspracherecht.

Die BRD forciert die Herstellung der deutschen Einheit sowohl in der Erkenntnis, daß die historische Gelegenheit nicht verpaßt werden darf, als auch unter dem Druck des starken Übersiedlerstroms (1989 insges. 340.000; seit Beginn laufenden Jahres 85.000). Die Bonner Regierung anerkennt das Sicherheitsbedürfnis der SU, will die deutsche Einheit in die europäische Gesamtentwicklung eingebettet wissen, lehnt aber die von SU vorgeschlagene Neutralisierung ab. BK Kohl hat das Verlangen nach definitiver Anerkennung der Oder-Neisse-Grenze aus innenpolitischen Gründen (Verlust von Wählern an die Republikaner, Vorwurf des „Ausverkaufs deutschen Bodens“), aber auch aus der Überlegung heraus abgelehnt, daß Grenzerklärungen nur von einer gesamtdeutschen Regierung abgegeben werden könnten.

Grundsätzliche Einigung besteht darüber, daß im Falle der Herstellung der deutschen Einheit und eines Verbleibs Deutschlands im NATO-Bündnis der Wirkungsbereich der westlichen Allianz nicht auf das heutige Territorium der DDR ausgedehnt werden soll (d.h. keine Stationierung von integrierten NATO-Verbänden). Noch nicht geklärt ist, ob – zumindest für eine Übergangszeit – ein Teil der in der DDR stationierten Sowjettruppen dort verbleiben soll. AM Genscher hat angedeutet, daß die BRD grundsätzlich nicht abgeneigt wäre, entsprechende sowjetische Sicherheitsforderungen für eine gewisse Zeit zu akzeptieren.

Durch die sich abzeichnende deutsche Einheit und den damit zu erwartenden Abzug eines Großteils der sowjetischen Verbände aus der heutigen DDR (ca. 365.000 Mann) scheint auch die kürzlich zwischen den USA und der SU vereinbarte Höchstzahl der jeweils in Mitteleuropa stationierten Truppen von 195.000 Mann problematisch (zumal die sowjetischen Verbände auch aus der ČSSR abgezogen werden sollen). Im Falle einer deutschen Einigung wird diese Zahl einer Revision unterzogen werden müssen.

Sowjetunion: Die Haltung des Kreml ist – wohl in der Erkenntnis, daß die Entwicklung zur deutschen Einheit nicht aufgehalten werden kann – durch starke Konzessionen in dieser Frage gekennzeichnet. Nach wie vor aufrecht ist die sowjetische Forderung nach Einbettung der Herstellung der deutschen Einheit in den gesamteuropäischen Prozeß und das Verlangen von Grenzgarantien.

Die ursprüngliche Forderung nach Neutralisierung Gesamtdeutschlands wurde zwar formal nicht gänzlich fallengelassen (jüngste Erklärungen von AM Schewardnadse[8]), der Kohl-Besuch in Moskau[9] ergibt jedoch den Eindruck, daß die SU de facto nicht beabsichtigt, diese als conditio sine qua non aufrechtzuerhalten.

(Es stellt sich in diesen Zusammenhang übrigens die Frage, ob den sowjetischen Sicherheitsinteressen bei einer festen Verankerung Deutschlands im westlichen Bündnissystem (Kontrollfunktion!) nicht in stärkeren Maße Rechnung getragen wird, als im Falle einer Neutralisierung Deutschlands.)

Ständig neue Anregungen aus Moskau (zuletzt: Nur ein Friedensvertrag könne den Status Deutschlands in Europa bestimmen) lassen den Schluß zu, daß sich die sowjetische Führung bisher zu keiner definitiven Haltung durchgerungen hat.

Die Haltung der Westmächte läßt sich wie folgt charakterisieren:

USA: Unter den 3 Westmächten die positivste Einstellung zur deutschen Einheit. Hauptinteresse ist die feste Einbettung eines vereinigten Deutschland in die NATO. Zum Unterschied von Großbritannien und Frankreich treten die Befürchtungen vor einem künftigen Übergewicht Deutschlands in Europa oder vor negativen Konsequenzen für den EG-Integrationsprozeß zurück.

Großbritannien: Bemerkenswerte Haltungsänderung angesichts der unaufhaltsamen Entwicklung. Aber Warnungen PM Thatchers vor zu schnellem Vorgehen. Britisches Interesse, als Siegermacht des 2. Weltkrieges den Einigungsprozeß mitzubestimmen. Unausgesprochene Befürchtungen vor einem deutschen Übergewicht in Europa; Forderung nach Anerkennung der polnischen Westgrenze; Ablehnung einer Neutralisierung Deutschlands.

Frankreich: Befürchtungen, daß Einigungsprozeß den EG-Integrationsprozeß bremsen könnte und die BRD nunmehr ersterem zu große Priorität einräumt. Daher Vorschlag Mitterrands, die Schaffung einer EG-Währungsunion mit der Schaffung der deutsch-deutschen Wirtschafts- und Währungsunion zu koordinieren. Bestehen auf Mitspracherecht am deutschen Einigungsprozeß. Unbehagen vor deutschem Übergewicht in Europa; Forderung nach Anerkennung der polnischen Westgrenze. Ablehnung der Neutralisierung Deutschlands.

4)     Die wirtschaftlichen Aspekte:

BK Kohl hat in seiner Regierungserklärung vom 15.2.1990[10] darauf hingewiesen, daß die Wirtschaftskraft der DDR (ca. 1/4 der Einwohnerzahl und über 1/3 der geographischen Ausdehnung der BRD) ungefähr jener des mittelgroßen Bundeslandes Hessen entspreche; das in einem einzigen Jahr in der BRD neu geschaffene Geldvermögen entspreche ungefähr dem gesamten Bestand der Spareinlagen in der DDR. Wenn es gelänge, nur einen Teil des jährlichen BRD-Kapitalexportes (100 Mrd. DM) in die DDR zu leiten, könnte dies bereits starke wirtschaftliche Impulse bewirken.

Trotz des gewaltigen wirtschaftlichen Nachholbedarfes der DDR (gegenüber dem westdeutschen Standard fehlen beispielsweise 3,6 Mio. Kraftwagen, 8 Mio. Telephonanschlüsse und 600 Mrd. DM für Wohnraum) dürfte die Sanierung der DDR-Wirtschaft mittelfristig zu bewältigen sein, zumal das Bruttosozialprodukt das 10-fache der DDR beträgt und auch andere ausländische Investitionen in einen nach marktwirtschaftlichen Prinzipien umzuformenden Wirtschaftsraum fließen würden. Der Vollständigkeit halber sei festgehalten, daß BRD-think tanks zufolge die Kombination von BRD-Kapital und BRD-Know-how mit dem hohen Ausbildungsstandard der DDR-Arbeitnehmerschaft zu einem zweiten deutschen Wirtschaftswunder führen könnte.

Ein Sonderproblem stellen die eingegangenen Lieferverpflichtungen der DDR (Konsumgüter) an die Sowjetunion dar. Von BRD-Seite wurde zu verstehen gegeben, daß man im Falle einer deutschen Einigung bereit wäre, in diese Verpflichtungen einzutreten.

5)     Mögliche künftige Entwicklung:

Die Schaffung der Wirtschafts- und Währungsunion soll nach den DDR-Wahlen an 18. März 1990 zügig vorangetrieben werden (gewisse Vorarbeiten werden durch bestehende Kommissionen schon jetzt in Angriff genommen).

Im April 1990 soll ein Gipfel zur Frage der deutschen Einheit stattfinden, der sich mit deren Konsequenzen für die Gemeinschaften befassen wird.[11]

Die 4 Siegermächte des 2. Weltkriegs und die beiden deutschen Staaten (Formel „2+4“) haben sich bei der „open skies“-Konferenz in Ottawa am 14. Februar 1990[12] darauf geeinigt, eine Konferenz abzuhalten (voraussichtlich noch im Frühjahr 1990),[13] um die äußeren Aspekte der Herstellung der deutschen Einheit, einschließlich der Fragen der Sicherheit der Nachbarstaaten, zu besprechen. Vorbereitende Kontakte auf Beamtenebene sollen schon in Kürze aufgenommen werden. Hiebei wurde gleichzeitig implizite zum Ausdruck gebracht, daß die Gestaltung der inneren Aspekte der Einheit durch die beiden deutschen Staaten selbst vorgenommen werden soll.

Das Ergebnis der „2+4“-Konferenz könnte dann einem KSZE-Sondergipfel unterbreitet und sanktioniert werden.

Plattner m.p[14]

[1] Bei dem „Vertrag über die Beziehung zwischen der BRD und den Drei Mächten“ (1952) handelt es sich um einen am 26. Mai 1952 geschlossenen Vertrag zwischen der BRD und den West-Alliierten Frankreich, Großbritannien und den USA, der das bis dahin geltenden Besatzungsstatut ablöste und die Unterzeichner zur Wiedervereinigung Deutschlands und den Abschluss einen Friedensvertrag für Gesamtdeutschland verpflichtete. Der Vertrag ist auch unter den Bezeichnungen „Generalvertrag“ und „Deutschlandvertrag“ bekannt; abgedruckt in: Auswärtiges Amt unter Mitwirkung eines wissenschaftlichen Beirats (ed.), Die Auswärtige Politik der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, (Köln: Verlag Wissenschaft und Politik, 1972), 208–212. Er trat in seiner endgültigen Fassung am 5. Mai 1955 nach dem NATO-Beitritt der BRD in Kraft. Siehe Gesetz betreffend das Protokoll vom 23. Oktober 1954 über die Beendigung des Besatzungsregimes in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland vom 24. März 1955, BGBl. 1955 II, 213-214; Protokoll über die Beendigung des Besatzungsregimes in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland unterzeichnet in Paris am 23. Oktober 1954, BGBl. 1955 II, 215–252 und Bekanntmachung über das Inkrafttreten des Protokolls vom 23. Oktober 1954 über die Beendigung des Besatzungsregimes in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, BGBl. 1955 II, 628.

[2] Das Viermächte-Abkommen wurde am 3. September 1971 von den vier Siegermächten (Frankreich, Großbritannien, UdSSR, USA) unterzeichnet und trat am 3. Juni 1972 in Kraft, siehe Viermächte-Abkommen (mit den Anlagen I, II, III und V) vom 3. September 1971 (=Dokument 24), in: Zehn Jahre Deutschlandpolitik. Die Entwicklung der Beziehungen zwischen der Bundesrepublik Deutschland und der Deutschen Demokratischen Republik 1969–1979. Bericht und Dokumentation, (Bonn: Bundesministerium für innerdeutsche Beziehungen, 1980), 158–162.

[3] Der Originalwortlaut der Präambel des Grundgesetzes 1949 lautet: „Im Bewußtsein seiner Verantwortung vor Gott und den Menschen, von dem Willen beseelt, seine nationale und staatliche Einheit zu wahren und als gleichberechtigtes Glied in einem vereinten Europa dem Frieden der Welt zu dienen, hat das Deutsche Volk in den Ländern Baden, Bayern, Bremen, Hamburg, Hessen, Niedersachsen, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Rheinland-Pfalz, Schleswig-Holstein, Württemberg-Baden und Württemberg-Hohenzollern, um dem staatlichen Leben für eine Übergangszeit eine neue Ordnung zu geben, kraft seiner verfassungsgebenden Gewalt dieses Grundgesetz der Bundesrepublik Deutschland beschlossen. Es hat auch für jene Deutschen gehandelt, denen mitzuwirken versagt war. Das gesamte Deutsche Volk bleibt aufgefordert, in freier Selbstbestimmung die Einheit und Freiheit Deutschlands zu vollenden.“

[4] Der „Brief zur deutschen Einheit“ (1970), der die Option zur Wiederherstellung der deutschen Einheit in einer europäischen Friedensordnung offen hielt, wurde im Mai von Egon Bahr ausgehandelt und anlässlich der Unterzeichnung des Moskauer Vertrages vom 12. August 1970 dem sowjetischen Außenministerium übergeben. Vgl. BGBl. 1972 II, 356.

[5] Die Römer Verträge zur Gründung der Europäischen Wirtschaftsgemeinschaft (EWG) und Europäischen Atomgemeinschaft (EAG) wurden am 25. März 1957 von Vertretern der Regierungen Belgiens, der Niederlande, Luxemburgs, der BRD, Frankreichs und Italiens unterzeichnet. Vgl. BGBl. 1947 II, 753–1224. Zum Zusatzprotokoll über den innerdeutschen Handel und die damit zusammenhängenden Fragen siehe BGBl. 1957 II, 984–986.

[6] Dazu zählen insbesondere der „Moskauer Vertrag“ mit dem „Brief zur deutschen Einheit“ (1970), der „Warschauer Vertrag“ (1970), das Viermächte-Abkommen über Berlin (1971), der Transitvertrag (1971), der Verkehrsvertrag (1972), der Grundlagenvertrag (1972) und schließlich noch der „Prager Vertrag“ (1973). Den Anfang machte der Moskauer Vertrag vom 12. August 1970 in dem sich die Bundesrepublik und die Sowjetunion dazu verpflichteten die Entspannung und den Frieden in Europa zu fördern, in Streitfragen auf die Anwendung von Gewalt zu verzichten und die in Europa bestehenden Grenzen anzuerkennen (Artikel 3). Vertrag zwischen der Bundesrepublik Deutschland und der Union der Sozialistischen Sowjetrepubliken, 12. August 1970 (Dokument 19), in: Bundesministerium für innerdeutsche Beziehungen (ed.), Zehn Jahre Deutschlandpolitik, 156. Erstveröffentlicht in: BGBl. II, 1972, 354–355. Aufgrund der Formulierungen in Artikel 3 des Moskauer Vertrags übergab die Bundesrepublik anlässlich der Unterzeichnung den „Brief zur deutschen Einheit“ in dem festgehalten wurde, „daß dieser Vertrag nicht im Widerspruch zu dem politischen Ziel der Bundesrepublik Deutschland steht, auf einen Zustand des Friedens in Europa hinzuwirken, in dem das deutsche Volk in freier Selbstbestimmung seine Einheit wiedererlangt“. Siehe: Brief zur deutschen Einheit, 12. August 1970 (= Dokument 20), in Bundesministerium für innerdeutsche Beziehungen (ed.), Zehn Jahre Deutschlandpolitik, 156–157. Erstveröffentlicht in: BGBl. II, 1972, 356. Als nächster Schritt folgte der „Warschauer Vertrag“ in dem die Bundesrepublik de facto die Oder-Neiße-Grenze anerkannte. Siehe: Vertrag zwischen der Bundesrepublik Deutschland und der Volksrepublik Polen über die Grundlagen der Normalisierung ihrer gegenseitigen Beziehungen vom 7. Dezember 1970 („Warschauer Vertrag“), BGBl. 1972 II, Nr. 27, 361. Am 3. September 1971 konnte nach langwierigen Verhandlungen das Viermächte-Abkommen über Berlin unterzeichnet werden. In diesem wurde festgehalten, dass West-Berlin kein Bestandteil der Bundesrepublik sei, gleichzeitig aber seitens der Sowjetunion die enge Bindung zwischen Bundesrepublik und West-Berlin anerkannt und zugesichtert diese Verbindungen künftig nicht zu behindern. Die Aushandlung der Modalitäten wurde den beiden deutschen Staaten überlassen Siehe: Viermächte-Abkommen (mit den Anlagen I, II, III, IV), 3. September 1971 (Dokument 24), in: Bundesministerium für innerdeutsche Beziehungen (ed.), Zehn Jahre Deutschlandpolitik, 158–162. Nachdem die Sowjetunion im Viermächte-Abkommen den ungehinderten Transitverkehr durch die DDR nach West-Berlin zugesagt hatte konnten die Verhandlungen über das Transitabkommen mit der DDR rasch abgeschlossen werden. Siehe: Abkommen zwischen der Regierung der Bundesrepublik Deutschland und der Regierung der Deutschen Demokratischen Republik über den Transitverkehr von zivilen Personen und Gütern zwischen der Bundesrepublik Deutschland und Berlin (West) (mit Anlage und Protokollvermerken), 17. Dezember 1971 (= Dokument 31), in: Bundesministerium für innerdeutsche Beziehungen (ed.), Zehn Jahre Deutschlandpolitik, 169–174. Die sogenannten „Ostverträge“ wurden am 17. Mai 1972 vom Bundestag ratifiziert. Das Viermächte-Abkommen und der Transitvertrag traten am 3. Juni 1972 in Kraft. Bereits am 26. Mai 1972 erfolgte die Unterzeichnung des „Verkehrsvertrag“: Vertrag zwischen der Bundesrepublik Deutschland und der Deutschen Demokratischen Republik über Fragen des Verkehrs (mit Protokollvermerken sowie Briefwechseln und Erklärungen der Staatssekretär Bahr und Kohl) vom 26. Mai 1972 (= Dokument 38), in: Bundesministerium für innerdeutsche Beziehungen (ed.), Zehn Jahre Deutschlandpolitik, 183–188. Am 8. November 1972 wurde der „Grundlagenvertrag“ zwischen der Bundesrepublik und der DDR, der das künftige Verhältnis der beiden deutschen Staaten unter Aufrechterhaltung der beiderseitigen Standpunkte in Grundsatzfragen regelte, paraphiert, die Unterzeichnung erfolgte am 21. Dezember 1972. Siehe: Vertrag über die Grundlagen der Beziehungen zwischen der Bundesrepublik Deutschland und der Deutschen Demokratischen Republik, 21. Dezember 1972 (= Dokument 53), in: Bundesministerium für innerdeutsche Beziehungen (ed.), Zehn Jahre Deutschlandpolitik, 205–208 (Erstveröffentlicht in: BGBl. II, 1973, 423–427), für die Briefwechsel, Erläuterungen und Erklärungen im Zusammenhang mit dem Vertrag siehe 208–213. Durch den „Prager Vertrag“ vom 11. Dezember 1973 wurde schließlich nach zähen Verhandlungen auch das Verhältnis zur Tschechoslowakei normalisiert, Gesetz zu dem Vertrag vom 11. Dezember 1973 über die gegenseitigen Beziehungen zwischen der Bundesrepublik Deutschland und der Tschechoslowakischen Sozialistischen Republik („Prager Vertrag“), BGBl. 1974 II, S. 990–992.

[7] Siehe Urteil des Bundesverfassungsgerichtes zum Vertrag über die Grundlagen der Beziehungen zwischen der Bundesrepublik Deutschland und der Deutschen Demokratischen Republik vom 31. Juli1973 (= Dokument 68), in: Bundesministerium für innerdeutsche Beziehungen (ed.), Zehn Jahre Deutschlandpolitik, 232–243.

[8] Siehe Rede Schewardnadses am 19. Dezember 1989 vor dem Europa-Parlament in Brüssel, in: Auswärtiges Amt der Bundesrepublik Deutschland (ed.), Umbruch in Europa. Die Ereignisse im 2. Halbjahr 1989. Eine Dokumentation, (Bonn: 1990), 146–153. Zur Einschätzung der Rede und eines TASS-Beitrags vom 2. Februar 1990 vgl. Rafael Biermann, Zwischen Kreml und Kanzleramt. Wie Moskau mit der deutschen Einheit rang, (Paderborn/München/Wien/Zürich: Schöningh, 1997), 367–370 sowie 421.

[9] Kohl traf am 10. Februar 1990 mit Gorbatschow in Moskau zusammen. Gorbatschow widersprach der Ablehnung der Neutralität Gesamtdeutschlands zumindest nicht. Siehe Gespräch des Bundeskanzler Kohl mit Generalsekretär Gorbatschow Moskau, 10. Februar 1990 (= Dokument Nr. 174), in: Hanns Jürgen Küsters/Daniel Hofmann (Bearb.), Deutsche Einheit. Sonderedition aus den Akten des Bundeskanzleramtes 1989/90 (München: Oldenbourg, 1998), 795–807; Gespräch Gorbačevs mit Bundeskanzler Kohl am 10. Februar 1990 [Auszug] (= Dokument 72), in: ibid., 317–333, insbesondere 329–331; Zweites Gespräch Gorbačevs mit Bundeskanzler Kohl am 10. Februar 1990 [Auszug] (= Dokument 72), in: Galkin/Tschernjajew (ed.), Michail Gorbatschow und die deutsche Frage, 333–337. Die Uneinheitlichkeit der sowjetischen Position geht aus den Äußerungen Schewardnadses gegenüber Genscher hervor. Aufzeichnung des Dg 21, Höynck, vom 11. Februar 1990 über das Gespräch von Bundesaußenminister Genscher mit dem sowjetischen Außenminister Ševardnadze am 10. Februar 1990 in Moskau [Auszug] (= Dokument 20), in: Andreas Hilger (ed.), Diplomatie für die deutsche Einheit. Dokumente des Auswärtigen Amts zu den deutsch-sowjetischen Beziehungen 1989/90, (München: Oldenbourg, 2011), 98–105, insbesondere 102.

[10] Deutscher Bundestag. Stenografischer Bericht 197. Sitzung, Bonn, 15. Februar 1990, 15102–15110.

[11] Der EG-Sondergipfel fand am 28. April 1990 in Dublin statt.

[12] Die NATO-Ministerratstagung in Ottowa fand am 13. Februar 1990 statt. Für das Protokoll siehe: NATO-Ministerratstagung in Ottowa, 13. Februar 1990 (= Dokument 50), in: Heike Amos/Tim Geiger (Bearb.), Die Einheit. Das Auswärtige Amt, das DDR-Außenministerium und der Zwei-plus-Vier-Prozess, ed. von Horst Möller/Ilse Dorothee Pautsch/Gregor Schöllgen/Hermann Wentker/Andreas Wirsching (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2015), 260–263.

[13] Das Treffen fand schließlich am 5. Mai 1990 in Bonn statt. (=Dokument Nr. 268), in: Hanns Jürgen Küsters/Daniel Hofmann (Bearb.), Deutsche Einheit. Sonderedition aus den Akten des Bundeskanzleramtes 1989/90 (München: Oldenbourg, 1998), 1090–1094.

[14] Johann Plattner (geb. 1932), Leiter der Abteilung II/1 (West- und Nordeuropa) der Sektion II im österreichischen Außenministerium (1987–1993).