Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

July 22, 1978

CABLE NO. 1384, AMBASSADOR SATO TO THE FOREIGN MINISTER, 'TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA NEGOTIATIONS (2ND MEETING)'

CITATION SHARE DOWNLOAD
  • Citation

    get citation

    Negotiation talks include the anti-hegemony clause and the foreign relations of China and Japan.
    "Cable No. 1384, Ambassador Sato to the Foreign Minister, 'Treaty of Peace and Friendship between Japan and China Negotiations (2nd Meeting)'," July 22, 1978, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, 2010-367, Act on Access to Information Held by Administrative Organs. Also available at the Diplomatic Archives of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan. Contributed by Yutaka Kanda and translated by Stephen Mercado. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/219982
  • share document

    https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/219982

VIEW DOCUMENT IN

English HTML

Number: (TA) R052940      5285

Primary: Asian Affairs Bureau Director-General

Sent: China, July 22, 1978,   19:40

Received: MOFA, July 22, 1978,   21:30

To: The Foreign Minister

From: Ambassador Sato

Treaty of Peace and Friendship between Japan and China Negotiations (2nd Meeting)

No. 1384 Secret Top Urgent (Limited Distribution)

Re: Outgoing Telegram No. 1371

Following is a summary of the second meeting, which took place for approximately two hours, between three o’clock and five o’clock (including break time), on the afternoon of the 22nd. (The place of the meeting and the participants were the same as for the first meeting.)

1. First, Vice Minister Han, based on a text prepared in advance, said that the Chinese side had examined at length and in earnest the Japanese side’s opening remarks from the previous day. The Japanese side’s thinking had been made clear many times to date and was not new to the Chinese side. The Chinese side, as it had had the Japanese side’s thinking made clear once again, would also succinctly state the Chinese side’s thinking. He then stated the following two points:

1) First, concerning Japan’s foreign relation, to which the Ambassador referred, we understand that relations between Japan and the United States are in a special position. The Chinese side has always said that relations between Japan and the United States come first and that those between China and Japan come second. We expect Japan and the United States to improve their mutual relations on the basis of equality. We understand that Japan, facing an actual threat under the present international circumstances, is in need of the Japan-US Security Treaty for its national security. We say that relations between China and Japan are in second place in comparison to those between Japan and the United States, but it absolutely will not do for Sino-Japanese relations to be treated as trifling, for others to interfere in them as they please or to treat them lightly. My thinking is that in any country’s foreign policy there is going to be a focus. Japan has to put its focus between the United States and the Soviet Union and is incapable of an equidistant policy between China and the Soviet Union. As China sees it, a so-called equidistant diplomacy is in fact impossible. Both China and Japan are independent and sovereign countries. Both have adopted their own independent foreign policy. Neither country should interfere in the internal affairs of the other party, much less impose on the other. This goes without saying.

China’s foreign policy certainly has differences from that of Japan, but this will not prevent both countries – on the basis of the Joint Statement and in seeking common ground while putting aside differences – from ceaselessly advancing good-neighborly and friendly relations and making the contributions that both countries should make for improving the situation in the Asia-Pacific region. What is important in the treaty talks is to affirm the points in common for both sides.

China and Japan’s concluding this treaty and fortifying and developing the two countries’ relations of peace and friendship do not harm the interests of third countries. At the same time, we absolutely cannot accept any third country butting into the affairs of our two countries or interfering in them. This, too, is a self-evident truth.

(2) Second, I will speak concerning the issue of the anti-hegemony clause. We view as very important the Ambassador’s statement yesterday in regard to the Government of Japan’s position on the issue of hegemony that it remains steadfast according to Article 7 of the Joint Statement. The Chinese Government has consistently called for the conclusion of this treaty as soon as possible on the basis of the Joint Statement and for the development of relations between our two countries. The anti-hegemony clause is an important principle of the Joint Statement and reflects a point in common of the foreign policies of the governments of our two countries. The anti-hegemony clause is that which most conforms to logic. If a country seeks peace and friendship, then any country must be on friendly terms with that country, but do you think that it would be possible to be on friendly terms with someone seeking hegemony?

There would be nothing to do in response to this but to resist it. As the Ambassador mentioned in his remarks yesterday, in the world there are a very few people who are intent on opposing the anti-hegemony clause. If they do not seek hegemony, then why should they be concerned that others are opposed to hegemony? This simply reveals that they are either seeking hegemony or that they are thinking to seek it.

Yesterday, the Ambassador mentioned for reference the Government of Japan’s Soviet policy, so I would like now to state here for reference the Chinese side’s view. We do not oppose Japan’s long having maintained correct relations with the Soviet Union.  We understand Japan’s wish to develop friendly relations with all countries. However, not everything objective can be decided according to one’s subjective desires.  As with the Ambassador’s statement itself yesterday, even today, more than 30 years after the end of the Second World War, the Soviet Union is still in illegal occupation of Japan’s four northern islands and rejects Japan’s just claims. That is not all. The Soviet air force and navy ceaselessly pose a military threat to Japan. It is completely right for the Government of Japan to oppose the Soviet Union’s violent and unreasonable behavior. We have always supported resolutely the government and people of Japan in such a just struggle. We consider our attitude in this regard to be entirely consistent with the spirit of the Sino-Japanese Joint Statement.

The Soviet Union has engaged in various threats and intimidation against Japan in regard to concluding this treaty and has applied a variety of pressures. This is the Soviet Union’s old trick. Our conclusion, drawn from long years of association with the Soviet Union, is exactly that the Soviet attitude is one of bullying the weak and fearing those with a firm attitude. Ambassador Ogawa has spoken time and again on this point.  It becomes a trap: the more restrained one is toward the Soviet Union, the more one is despised. There is nothing exceptional about facing them with a bit of a firm attitude.

In the Ambassador’s remarks yesterday the phrase “any specific third country” appeared time and again.  Frankly speaking, that refers to the Soviet Union.  Our treaty does not refer to the Soviet Union by name.  The Ambassador, too, said yesterday that everyone, no matter who it is, opposes those who would seek hegemony. This is correct. Accordingly, there is no need to use “any specific third country,” which is a substitute for another name. I have said enough. I ask the Japanese side for its consideration.

2. I replied to Vice Minister Han’s statement in say, “I think that my replying to what Vice Minister Han Nianlong has just said would be beneficial to an increasingly clearer understanding of the positions of our two countries. In response to such a well-considered statement, however, I think that an immediate reaction would perhaps be lacking in courtesy.” I next proposed, “As promised yesterday, I think that our side would like to put forth a treaty draft, but much time has passed, so I would like to take a break of 10 to 15 minutes.” We then took a break for 25 minutes.

3. We met again from around 4:15. After I read aloud nearly verbatim the opening section of the “Explanation on the Japanese Side’s New Treaty Draft Proposal,” prepared by our Ministry, we distributed Japanese and Chinese versions of the Japanese side’s new treaty draft to the Chinese side. Treaties Division Director Saito then read aloud the distributed treaty draft and explained each article on the basis of the Ministry’s “Explanation.”

4. After finishing the explanation, I said that I would happily answer any questions the Chinese side might have regarding the Japanese side’s explanation. When I said that I would be happy to listen to the Chinese side’s thoughts at the next meeting as well, when the Chinese side would have examined the Japanese draft in earnest, Vice Minister Han said that he had heard the Japanese side’s explanation on its draft but proposed, “I would like to state the Chinese side’s views and opinions in regard to the draft at the next meeting, following careful study of the draft. I would to end today’s meeting here.”

5. When I replied to this in proposing, “The Japanese side, as the delegation has come here from Tokyo, would like to hold the next meeting on Monday (the 24th), if possible.” Vice Minister Han then replied only with, “I would like to have the next meeting as soon as possible, but how about leaving the scheduling details to the liaison officers of our two sides?” I further proposed, “Even if the Chinese side will not be prepared in regard to the new treaty draft, I would like to state the Japanese side’s thinking in regard to what Vice Minister Han has said today, so I would like to hold the next meeting on Monday.” Vice Minister Han thereupon said, “Then let us ‘provisionally’ decide on holding the next meeting on Monday. Repeated exchanges of opinion are a good thing.”

6. Last, I proposed again consulting on a press statement. Vice Minister Han said, “In the same way as yesterday, we will not touch on the details of today’s meeting. The Japanese side ought to say that today it presented the treaty draft to the Chinese side.” With that, we ended today’s meeting.

(End)

JAPANESE (TRANSCRIPTION) HTML

極秘

総番号 (TA) R052940  5285  主管

78年  月22日19時40分  中国発

78年07月22日21時30分  本省着  アジア局長

外務大臣殿  佐藤大使

日中平和友好条約交渉(第2回会談)

第1384号 極秘 大至急

(限定配布)

往電第1371号に関し

22日午後3時より5時まで約2時間(休けい時間も含む)にわたり第2回会談を行なつたところ、概要次のとおり。(会談の場所及び出席者は第1回会談に同じ)

1.先ず韓副部長はあらかじめ用意された原こうに基づき昨日の日本側の冒頭発言を詳細かつ真けんに検討したが、この日本側の考え方は今までにしばしば明らかにされたことであり、中国側にとつて新しい内容ではないが、日本側より再度日本側の考え方を明らかにしていただいたので、中国側も中国側の考え方を簡けつに述べるとして、次の2点を述べた。

(1)第1に私達は大使の発言において言及された日本の対外関係において日米関係は特別な地位にあるということを理解している。中国側は常に日米関係は第1のものであり、中日関係は第2のものであると言つている。私達は日米両国が平等の基礎の上に相互の関係を良くすることを期待し、当面の国際情勢の下で現実のきよういに直面する日本が国家の安全のために日米安保条約を必要とすることも理解している。日米関係に比べれば中日関係が第2のものであると私達は言つているが、このことは決して中日関係をとるに足りない地位において人に欲しいままに干渉され、かつ振り回されてもよいというものでもない。私達の考えでは、いかなる国の外交政策にも重点があるべきである。日本は米とソとの間において重点を置かなければならないし、中とソとの間にも等きよ離はあり得ないことである。いわゆる等きよ離外交は中国から見れば実際には不可能なことである。中日両国は、いずれも独立の主権国家である。双方はそれぞれ自主独立の外交政策をとつており、双方は、相手側の内政に干渉すべきでなく、人に押しつけることなどなお更問題になりない{前4文字ママ}ことであり、これは言うまでもないことである。

中国の外交政策は、確かに日本の外交政策と異なるところがあるが、これは共同声明を基礎にし、小異を残して大同を求め、両国の善りん友好的関係を絶えず前進させ、アジア・太平洋地域の情勢を改善するために両国が然るべきこうけんをすることをさまたげるものではない。条約交渉において重要なことは、双方の共通点をこう定することである。

中日両国がこの条約を締結し、両国の平和友好関係を強固にし発展させることは、第三国の利益を損うものではない。同時に如何なる第三国が両国間のことがらに横やりを入れ、干渉することも絶対に容認できない。これも自明の道理である。

(2)第2に、反は権条項の問題について述べる。日本政府のは権問題に関する立場は、共同声明第7項のとおり不動であるとの昨日の大使の発言を、私たちは非常に重要視している。中国政府は、共同声明を基礎にして1日も早くこの条約を締結し、両国関係を発展させることを一かんして主張している。反は権条項は、共同声明の重要な原則であり、両国政府の対外政策の共通点を反えいしている。反は権条項は、最も論理にかなつている。平和と友好を求める国であれば、どの国であつてもその国と友好的につきあわなければならないが、は権を求めるものに対して友好的につきあうことなど出来るであろうか。

これに対しては、反抗する他ない。昨日、大使の発言の中で言及されているように、世界には確かに極く1部の人がやつきになつて反は権条項に反対している。もし、は権を求めないのであれば、どうして他の人がは権に反対することを心配するのであろうか。それは、ただ彼ら自身がは権を求めておりまたは求めようとしていることをばくろしているにすぎない。

昨日、大使が参考までに日本政府の対ソ政府に言及したので、私もここで参考までに中国側の意見を述べたい。私たちは、従来から日本がソ連とコレクトな関係を維持することには反対していない。すべての国家と友好関係を維持し発展させようとする日本の願望は理解する。しかし客観的事物は、すべてが人々の主観的な願望で決定できるものではない。昨日の大使の発言にもあつたように、第2次世界大戦後既に30余年も過ぎた今日でも、ソ連が依然として日本の北方4島を不法占拠し日本の正当な要求を拒絶している。そればかりではなく、ソ連の空軍と海軍は絶えず日本に軍事的きよういを与えている。日本政府がソ連のかかるきよう暴で理不じんなやり方に反対することは全く正当なものである。私たちは一かんして日本政府と人民のこのような正義の闘争を断固として支持しているし、私たちのこのような態度は全く中日共同声明の精しんに合致するものと考えている。

ソ連がこの条約の締結の問題において絶えず日本に対して種々様々なおどしや恐かつを行ない、いろいろな圧力をかけてきている。これはソ連の常とう手段である。私たちがなが年ソ連とつき合つて引き出した結論は他でもなくソ連が態度の弱い者をいじめ、態度の強い者を恐れることである。この点について小川前大使に何回も話したことがある。ソ連に対してはえん慮すればするほどますますあなどられるハメになるが、少し強い態度で立ち向うとどうということはない。

昨日の大使の発言の中に何回も「特定の第三国」という言ばがあつたが、ズバリと言えばそれはソ連のことを指している。私たちの条約はソ連を名指していない。大使も昨日だれであれは権を求める試みがあれば反対であると言われたがこれは正しい。従つて「特定の第三国」という代名しを使用するいかなる必要もない。私の発言はこの位にして日本側の御検討を願う。

2.以上の韓副部長の発言に対し、本使より「私の方からただ今の韓念リュウ副部長の発言に対しお答えすることは両国の立場をますます明確に理解するため有益であると思う。これだけよく検討された御発言に対し早急な反応をするのはむしろれいぎを失するのではないかと考える。私も週末ゆつくり考えこの次の会議でただ今の発言に対する回答を行ないたいと思う」と述べ、次いで「昨日約束したように、わが方から条約案を提出したいと思うが、大分時間がたつので10分か15分休けいしたいと思う」と提案し約25分間の休けいに入つた。

3.4時15分ごろ会談を再開し、本使より本省で用意した「日本側新条約案提案についての説明」の冒頭発言部分をほぼそのまま読み上げた後、中国側に対し日本側新条約草案の日本文及び中国文を配布し引き続きサイトウ条約課長より、配布済みの条約文を読み上げつつ、上記の本省作成の「説明」に基づき各条毎の説明を行つた。

4.説明終了後、本使より中国側に対し日本側の説明につき質問があればよろこんで答える。中国側が日本側草案を真けんに検討し、次回の会合においてでも中国側の考えをうかがえれば幸いである旨述べたところ、韓副部長より、日本側の草案に対する説明をちよう取したが、「草案に対する中国側の見方と意見は詳細に草案を検討した上で次回の会合において述べたい。本日の会議はここまでにしたい」と提案した。

5.これに対し本使より、「日本側は、代表団が東京より来ているので、出来れば次の会合を月よう(24日)に行いたい」と提案したところ、韓副部長は「出来るだけ早く次回の会合を開催したいが、具体的日取りは双方の連絡係を通じて決めたらどうか」と回答するに留まつたので、本使より更に「もし新条約草案に対する中国側の見解表明の準備が間に合わなくとも本日の韓副部長の発言に対する日本側の考え方を述べたいので、次回の会合は月よう日に開いていただきたい」と申し入れたところ、韓副部長は、「それでは『暫定的に』次回会合は月ように開催することとしよう。お互いに意見交換を重ねることはいいことだ」と述べた。

6.最後に本使より、再び新聞発表について相談したい旨申し入れ、「昨日と同様本日も会議の内容には触れないが、日本側が本日条約草案を中国側に提出したことは言わざるを得ない」と述べたところ、先方は「結構である」と答えた。以上をもつて本日の会議を終了した。

(了)

ORIGINAL SCAN PDF

It appears your Web browser is not configured to display PDF files. No worries, just click here to download the PDF file.

Click here to view the PDF file in a new window.

PDFs cannot be printed inline in the page. To print a PDF, you must first download the file and open it in a PDF viewer.