Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

July 24, 1978

CABLE NO. 1396, AMBASSADOR SATO TO THE FOREIGN MINISTER, 'TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA NEGOTIATIONS (3RD MEETING - PART 1)'

CITATION SHARE DOWNLOAD
  • Citation

    get citation

    The delegations address diplomatic relations with the United States and the Soviet Union during negotiations.
    "Cable No. 1396, Ambassador Sato to the Foreign Minister, 'Treaty of Peace and Friendship between Japan and China Negotiations (3rd Meeting - Part 1)'," July 24, 1978, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, 2010-367, Act on Access to Information Held by Administrative Organs. Also available at the Diplomatic Archives of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan. Contributed by Yutaka Kanda and translated by Stephen Mercado. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/219983
  • share document

    https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/219983

VIEW DOCUMENT IN

English HTML

Number: (TA) R053132     5301

Primary: Asian Affairs Bureau Director-General

Sent: China, July 24, 1978,   20:07

Received: MOFA, July 24, 1978,   21:32

To: The Foreign Minister      

From: Ambassador Sato

Treaty of Peace and Friendship between Japan and China Negotiations (3rd Meeting – Part 1)

No. 1396 Secret Top Urgent

(Limited Distribution)

Re: Outgoing Telegram No. 1384

Following is a summary of the third meeting, which took place for approximately two hours and twenty minutes, between 3:00 and 5:20 (including a break period of 35 minutes), on the afternoon of the 24th. (The place of the meeting and the participants were the same as for the first meeting.)

Vice Minister Han started by saying that he wished to ask my opinion as to which side to let speak first. I answered that, as there had been an agreement on that the last time, the Japanese side would like to speak first. I began the talks. Following are the details of what I said:

At the second meeting on the 22nd last week, you spoke, Vice Minister Han, on the Chinese side’s outlook. Today, please allow me to state succinctly once again the Japanese side’s thinking.

First, relations between Japan and the United States occupy a special status in our country’s diplomatic policy. We appraise the Chinese side for having stated its understanding in regard to our holding firm to the Japan-US security treaty system. At the same time, we also attach importance to the Chinese side’s having said – in regard to our country’s efforts to maintain and develop friendly relations with any country as our basic foreign policy – that it understands the policy as Japan’s wish. We intend to continue these efforts. One may say that our country has made Japan-US relations the axis of our country’s foreign policy, but it goes without saying that we do not consider relations between Japan and China as trifling or any such thing. We consider the maintaining of peaceful and friendly relations between Japan and China a major pillar in our country’s diplomacy. It is for that very reason that the Government of Japan desires to conclude as soon as possible a treaty of peace and friendship between Japan and China. We have been making efforts for it, as you know.

Our country has worked to maintain and develop friendly relations with any country. The Government of Japan has never referred to this as equidistant diplomacy.  It goes without saying that there is in reality a place of emphasis in Japan’s diplomacy as well. Also, in considering our country’s need to hold firm to the Japan-US Security Treaty system, we are under no illusion as to the source of the real threat to Japan.

Vice Minister Han, you said that the important thing in the talks for the treaty of peace and friendship between Japan and China is to confirm the points in common between Japan and China. We agree entirely with this. We consider the position of not seeking hegemony and opposing any other country or group of countries attempting to seek hegemony to be a point in common between Japan and China. Furthermore, Vice Minister Han, you said that in that case there would be nothing to do but to resist it. We do not deny that. It is simply that we think that Japan and China adopt their own respective positions in taking a position of opposition to attempts and acts of seeking hegemony and that Japan and China do not have to take joint action.

In addition, we thank you, Vice Minister Han, for having stated for reference China’s view, based on experience, its attitude toward the Soviet Union.

Japan, too, has had various experiences over many years in regard to relations with the Soviet Union. I think that you understood what I said at the first meeting. It is definitely not that we have adopted a weak-kneed attitude. Our policy is one of continuing our country’s just claims on each issue with a resolute attitude. However, it is not a policy of confrontation but one of seeking to maintain correct relations that makes clear what is right and what is wrong. I take note of your saying that China does not oppose Japan’s maintaining correct relations with the Soviet Union.

Finally, Vice Minister Han, in the last part of what you said on the 22nd, you started with a “‘any specific third country’ appeared time and again” in my remarks of the 21st, then said  “there is no need to use ‘any specific third country.’” I will state my view on this point as follows:

In my remarks of the 21st, I used the phrase “any specific third country” three times. It has various meanings, which are not at all the same. That is to say:

I said that, “The Treaty of Peace and Friendship between Japan and China would not regard a ‘any specific third country’ with hostility, and that we are not concluding the treaty against it.” This is a natural conclusion, led by our setting as the treaty’s sole objective, as stated in the Japan-China Joint Communique, the solidifying and developing of relations of peace and friendship between Japan and China. I would not mind substituting here “any third country” for a “any specific third country.”

Next, I said that, “We reject the slander that Japan and China oppose attempts to establish hegemony.” Here, frankly speaking, a “any specific third country” is the Soviet Union. As you said, Vice Minister Han, “this treaty does not refer to the Soviet Union by name,” so I said that “we reject such a malicious statement.”

Third, I said that, “Opposition to hegemony by no means points in advance to a ‘any specific third country.’” “Opposition to hegemony is making clear that opposition to hegemony is opposing any attempt by any country or group of countries to establish hegemony,” so it is not as if would be fine if we simply specify some third country and adopt the position of opposition to that country’s to attempt to establish hegemony.

(End)

JAPANESE (TRANSCRIPTION) HTML

極秘

総番号 (TA) R053132  5301  主管

78年  月24日20時07分  中国発

78年07月24日21時32分  本省着  アジア局長

外務大臣殿  佐藤大使

日中平和友好条約交渉(第3回会談-その1)

第1396号 極秘 大至急

(限定配布)

往電第1384号に関し

24日午後3時より5時20分まで約2時間20分間(35分間の休けい時間を含む)にわたり第3回会談を行なつたところ概要次のとおり。(会談の場所及び出席者は第1回会談に同じ)

冒頭韓副部長より、本日はどちらの側から先に発言することとするか御意見をうかがいたいと述べたので、本使より先回の約束もあるので日本側より発言したい旨述べ、先ず本使より発言を行なつた。同発言内容次のとおり。

先週22日の第2回会談において韓副部長が発言された中国側の見解について、本日私より再び日本側の考え方を簡けつに述べさせていただく。

先ず、わが国の外交政策において、日米関係が特別の地位を占めており、今後とも日米安保条約体制をけん持して行くことについて中国側がこれを理解する旨述べられたことを評価する。同時に、わが国が、何れの国とも友好関係を維持発展させるよう努力することを基本的外交方針としていることについても中国側がこれを日本政府の願望として理解する旨述べられたことをわれわれは重視し上述の努力を続ける所存である。

わが国が、日米関係をわが国の対外関係の基じくとするといつても、わが国が日中関係を取るに足らぬものなどと考えていないことは申すまでもない。わが国は、日中間の平和友好関係の維持をわが国の外交における重要なハシラの一つと考えている。そうであるからこそ、日本政府は、日中平和友好条約を一日も早く締結することを念願し、そのために努力していることは御存知の通りである。

わが国が何れの国とも友好関係を維持発展させるよう努力するという政策をとつていることを日本政府は、未だかつて等きよ離外交などというこ称で述べたことはない。日本の外交においても現実には重点のおき所があることは論をまたないところである。また、わが国が日米安保条約体制をけん持する必要性を考える場合に、日本に対する現実のきよういが何処から来るかということについては何らのげん想もいだいていない。

韓副部長は、日中平和友好条約交渉に当り、重要なことは、日中双方の共通点を確認することであると述べられたが、われわれはこれに全く同感である。は権を求めず、また他のいかなる国あるいは国の集団がは権を求める試みにも反対であるとう立場は日中双方の共通点であるとわれわれは考える。更に韓副部長はは権を求めるものがあれは反こうするよりほかはないと述べられた。われわれはそれを否定しない。ただ、は権を求める試みや行為に反対の立場をとるに当つては日本も中国もそれぞれの立場から対処するものであり、日本と中国が一致して共同行動をとらねばならないというものではないと考える。

なお、われわれは韓副部長より、ソ連に対する態度について中国の経験に基づく見解を参考のために述べられたことに感謝する。

日本もソ連との関係については長年にわたつて種々の経験をもつている。日本の対ソ政策についての考えは、第1回会談において述べたところで御理解いただいたと思う。それは決して軟弱な態度をとつているわけではなく個々の問題についてき然たる態度でわが国の正しい主張を続けて行く方針である。しかし、それは対決政策ではなく、ぜぜ非々をはつきりさせるコレクトな関係の維持を図るということである。日本がソ連とコレクトな関係を維持することには反対していないという韓副部長の御発言に留意する。

最後に韓副部長は、22日の御発言の最後の部分において、私の21日の発言の中に「何回も『特定の第三国』という言ばがあつた」と前置して、「『特定の第三国』という代名しを使用する必要がない」と言われた。この点についての見解を以下に申しのべる。

私は、21日の発言において「特定の第三国」という言ばを3回使つた。その意味するところは、それぞれ全く同一ではない。すなわち、

私は、「日中平和友好条約は『特定の第三国』を敵視してこれに対して結ぶものではない」と言つた。このことは、この条約が、日中共同声明にもあるとおり、もつぱら日中間の平和友好関係を強固にし、発展させることを目的とするものであることから導びかれる当然の帰結である。この部分は「特定の第三国」という言ばを「いずれかの第三国」と置きかえても構わない。

次に私は、「日中両国がは権を確立しようとする試みに反対するものであるとの中しように対してはこれを否定する」と言つた。ここで「特定の第三国」というのは、ズバリ言えばソ連のことである。韓副部長の言われるように「この条約はソ連を名指していない」のであるから、私は、「そのような中しように対してはこれを否定する」と言つた。

第三国に私は、「は権反対は、決して予め『特定の第三国』を指しているものではない」と言つた。「は権反対は、いかなる国あるいは国の集団であれ、は権の確立を試みるものがあればこれに反対であることをせん明するもの」であるから、ある第三国を特定しておいて、その国のは権確立の試みにだけ反対の立場をとればよいというものではない。

(了)

写手交済(24日21時42分)

ORIGINAL SCAN PDF

It appears your Web browser is not configured to display PDF files. No worries, just click here to download the PDF file.

Click here to view the PDF file in a new window.

PDFs cannot be printed inline in the page. To print a PDF, you must first download the file and open it in a PDF viewer.