Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

July 25, 1978

CABLE NO. 1408, AMBASSADOR SATO TO THE FOREIGN MINISTER, 'TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA NEGOTIATIONS (4TH MEETING)'

CITATION SHARE DOWNLOAD
  • Citation

    get citation

    Negotiation topics include hegemony and word choice.
    "Cable No. 1408, Ambassador Sato to the Foreign Minister, 'Treaty of Peace and Friendship between Japan and China Negotiations (4th Meeting)'," July 25, 1978, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, 2010-367, Act on Access to Information Held by Administrative Organs. Also available at the Diplomatic Archives of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan. Contributed by Yutaka Kanda and translated by Stephen Mercado. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/220006
  • share document

    https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/220006

VIEW DOCUMENT IN

English HTML

Number: (TA) R053412     5319

Primary: Asian Affairs Bureau Director-General

Sent: China, July 25, 1978,   18:20

Received: MOFA, July 25, 1978,   19:47

To: The Foreign Minister     

From: Ambassador Sato

Treaty of Peace and Friendship between Japan and China Negotiations (4th Meeting)

No. 1408 Secret Top Urgent

(Limited Distribution)

Re: Outgoing Telegrams No. 1407

Concerning the Chinese side’s view regarding the Japanese side’s treaty draft, which Vice Minister Han stated in yesterday’s meeting, please allow me to state the Japanese side’s thinking.

First, regarding Sentence 1 of Article 3, of the Japanese side’s treaty draft, I will once more offer an explanation of the Japanese side’s thinking. As I said in the first meeting, this treaty is not an alliance treaty to make any country a common hypothetical enemy; nor does it regard any specific third country with hostility or is to be concluded against it. Vice Minister Han, too, at the meeting on the 22nd, said that Japan and China’s concluding a treaty of peace and friendship, solidifying and developing relations of peace and friendship, would not be prejudicial to the interests of third countries. The Japanese side’s Sentence 1 of Article 3 is an attempt above all to make this point clear.

Next, I will state our view in regard to Vice Minister Han’s statement concerning this provision.

First, Vice Minister Han said, touching on replacing the first part of Article 7 of the Joint Statement, that the phrase “this treaty” must be the phrase “solidifying and developing relations of peace and friendship.” Our thinking is that Japan and China’s solidifying and developing relations of peace and friendship, irrespective of concluding this treaty, is of course something that both countries should do and, in reality, have been making efforts to do so since the normalization of relations between Japan and China. Also, it is a self-evident truth that the development of relations of peace and friendship between Japan and China is not directed against any third country. There is no need to say this again in concluding the treaty. What we should make clear in concluding the treaty is that this treaty, the goal of which truly is the solidifying and developing of relations of peace and friendship between our two countries, is not directed against any specific third country. The Japanese side’s treaty draft stipulates this in the most concise and clear manner.

Second, Vice Minister Han said, “Would it not be self-contradictory to talk on the one hand of opposition to hegemony while on the other saying that is not directed against anyone?” Further, you said that Japan’s draft “simply weakens or renders toothless the spirit and substance of the anti-hegemony clause.” However, our thinking is that opposition to hegemony is in no way in contradiction with the phrase, “This treaty is not directed against any specific third country.” Also, the stipulation of Japan’s draft faithfully reflects the spirit of the Joint Communique. That is to say, in opposition to hegemony there is the aspect of direction against a third country, but this against any country that would seek hegemony, which means taking a position of opposition to it. Accordingly, there is absolutely no contradiction with Sentence 1 of Article 3, which makes clear that this treaty does not specify, regard with hostility or oppose any third country.

Third, the Chinese side said that there is no need to add the words “any specific.” With regard to this point, I touched on this yesterday in my statement, but opposition to hegemony, specifying a specific third country and adopting a position of opposition to that country’s hegemony, would be no trifling matter. Both Japan and China seek to make clear our adopting a position of opposition if there were a country seeking hegemony, no matter which country. The stipulation of the Japanese side’s treaty draft makes clear, with no room for doubt, the determination of our two countries.

This is our thinking regarding Sentence 1, Article 3, of the Japanese side’s treaty draft.

Next, Vice Minister Han said that, “Japan and China are both in the Asia-Pacific region, so clearly raising this region stands to reason.” We completely agree with this. The Japanese side’s treaty draft, first, in mentioning the Asia-Pacific region, emphasizes that the interests of both our countries are historically and actually in this region and, next, that it is clear that opposition to hegemony is a position that should not be limited to this region but one to which we should adhere in any region of the world. This is why I have made this point clear.

Lastly, I will speak regarding “opposition to” and “oppose.” As I said on the 22nd,  our using the expression “opposition to” in the Japanese side’s treaty draft is because we are expressing more accurately this clause’s original thinking. It is not at all an attempt to change the thinking behind the Joint Communique. Furthermore, the thinking behind anti-hegemony, first made clear in a document in the Shanghai Communique between the United States and China, became “each is opposed.” I think that this thinking has been inherited as is in the Japan-China Joint Communique. As you know,  both the English text of the Joint Communique prepared by the Japanese side and the English text of the Joint Communique prepared by the Chinese side use the expression “each is opposed.” If we shift this expression into Japanese, “is opposed” is more accurate than “oppose,” so we would like to use this accurate expression in the draft that our side is putting forth.

Vice Minister Han said that the Japanese sides hopes to produce a new proposal but, as you you understand from my explanation, we think that the Japanese side’s treaty draft is the best one. As for the Chinese side, we welcome further serious consideration and the expressing of a constructive opinion or the producing of a new proposal.

Further, Vice Minister Han said that if the anti-hegemony clause were settled, there would be no problem settling the other parts. However, from the viewpoint of promoting discussion, I propose here, on the basis of the Japanese side’s draft, that we informally hold discussions on the other clauses, including the preamble, parallel with those on Article 3.  

(End)

JAPANESE (TRANSCRIPTION) HTML

極秘

総番号 (TA) R053412  5319  主管

78年  月25日18時20分  中国発

78年07月25日19時47分  本省着  アジア局長

外務大臣殿  佐藤大使

日中平和友好条約交渉(第4回会談)

第1408号 極秘 大至急

(限定配布)

往電第1407号別電

昨24日の会談において韓副部長が述べられた日本側条約案に対する中国側見解に関し、日本側の考え方を述べさせていただきたいと思う。

先ず、日本側条約案第3条第1文について日本側の考え方をあらためて御説明する。私が第1回会談で述べたとおり、この条約は、いずれかの国を共通の仮想敵国とする同盟条約ではなく、また特定の第三国を敵視してこれに対して結ぶものでもない。韓副部長も、22日の会談において、日中両国が平和友好条約を締結し、平和友好関係を強固にし、発展させることは、第三国の利益を損うものではないと言われた。日本側案第3条第1文は、なによりもまずこの点を明確にせんとしているものである。

次に、この規定に関する韓副部長の御発言についてわれわれの意見を述べる。

第一に、韓副部長は、共同声明第7項の冒頭部分を置き代えるに当つて、「この条約は」との字くは、「平和友好関係を強固にし、発展させることは」という字くでなければならないと述べられた。われわれの考えでは、日中両国が平和友好関係を強固にし、発展させることは、この条約の締結とはかかわりなく、当然両国とも行うべきことであり、現実にも日中国交正常化以来双方の努力により行われてきたところである。また、日中両国間の平和友好関係の発展が第三国に対して向けらたものでないことは自明の理であり、条約締結に際して事新らしく述べる必要もないことである。条約締結の際に明らかにすべきことは、まさに両国間の平和友好関係を強固にし、発展させることを目的とするこの条約そのものが、特定の第三国に対して向けられたものではないということであつて、日本側条約案は、この旨も最も簡けつ明りように規定しているものである。

第二に、韓副部長は、「一方ではは権反対を言いながら、他方ではそれがだれに向けられたものではないというのは自家どう着ではないか」と言われ、更に、日本案は「反は権条項の精しんと実質を弱め、あるいはほねぬきにする」と言われた。しかしながら、われわれの考えでは、は権反対と、「この条約は特定の第三国に対して向けられたものではない」ということとはなんら自家どう着するものではない。また、日本案の規定は共同声明の精しんをちゆう実に反えいる{前4文字ママ}もので、反は権条項をなんら弱めるものではない。すなわち、は権反対には、第三国を対象とする面があるが、これはは権を求めようとする国があればいかなる国であれ、これに反対の立場をとることを意味するものである。従つて、この条約があらかじめいずれかの第三国を特定して、これを敵視し、これに対こうするものではないことを明らかにする第3条第1文とはなんらむじゆんするものではない。

第三に、中国側は「特定の」という言ばをつけ加える必要はないと言われた。この点については、昨日の私の発言の中でも触れたが、は権反対は、ある第三国を特定しておいて、その国のは権に反対の立場を取れば足りるというものではない。日中両国は、は権を求める国があれば、それがいかなる国であれ、これに反対の立場を取ることをせん明しようとしているのである。日本側条約案の規定は、この両国の決定を疑念の余地なく明確にするものである。

以上が、日本側条約案の第3条第1文に関する中国側御発言に対するわれわれの考えである。

次に、韓副部長は、「日中両国はアジア・太平洋地域にあるので、この地域を明確に取り上げることは理の当然である。」といわれた。われわれは、これにまつたく同感である。日本側条約案は、まずアジア・太平洋地域に言及することによつて、歴史的、現実的な両国の関心が主としてこの地域にあることを強調し、次いでは権反対はこの地域に限られるべきものではなく、世界のいかなる地域においても同じくけん持すべき立場であることは明白であるので、この旨を明らかにした次第である。

最後に「反対である」と「反対する」の問題について述べる。日本側条約案において「反対である」との表現を用いているのは、22日にも申し上げたとおり、これが日本語として、本項の本来の考え方をより正確に表すものだからであり、共同声明の思想を変更しようとするものではまつたくない。更につけ加えれば、反は権の思想が最初に文書に明らかにされた米中・上海コミュニケは、「EACH IS OPPOSED」となつており、この思想はそのまま日本共同声明に引き継がれているものと考える。日本側が作成した共同声明の英訳文も、中国側が作成した共同声明の英訳文も「EACH IS OPPOSED」との表現を用いていることは御承知のとおりである。この表現を日本語に移した場合、「反対する」より、「反対である」の方がより正確であることは明らかであるので、わが方提出の案文においては、この正確な表現を使用した。

韓副部長は、日本側が新らしい提案を行うことを希望すると言われたが、以上の御説明でおわかりのとおり、日本側はやはり日本側条約案が最善のものであると考えている。中国側において更に真けんに検討され、建設的な意見の表明なり、新らしい提案なりを行われることをかん迎する。

なお、韓副部長は、反は権条項が解決すれば、他の部分は解決しにくい問題ではないと言われたが、私はここに審議促進の見地から、日本側案を基礎として、前文を含む他の各条の審議を第3条の討議と平行して非公式に行うことを提案する。

(了)

ORIGINAL SCAN PDF

It appears your Web browser is not configured to display PDF files. No worries, just click here to download the PDF file.

Click here to view the PDF file in a new window.

PDFs cannot be printed inline in the page. To print a PDF, you must first download the file and open it in a PDF viewer.