Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

July 27, 1978

CABLE NO. 1433, AMBASSADOR SATO TO THE FOREIGN MINISTER, 'TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA NEGOTIATIONS (5TH MEETING, PART I)'

CITATION SHARE DOWNLOAD
  • Citation

    get citation

    A negotiation of word usage when expressing anti-hegemony in the Treaty.
    "Cable No. 1433, Ambassador Sato to the Foreign Minister, 'Treaty of Peace and Friendship between Japan and China Negotiations (5th Meeting, Part I)'," July 27, 1978, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, 2010-367, Act on Access to Information Held by Administrative Organs. Also available at the Diplomatic Archives of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan. Contributed by Yutaka Kanda and translated by Stephen Mercado. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/220007
  • share document

    https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/220007

VIEW DOCUMENT IN

English HTML

Number: (TA) R054127     5355

Primary: Asian Affairs Bureau Director-General

Sent: China, July 27, 1978,   23:55

Received: MOFA, July 28, 1978,   01:24

To: The Foreign Minister      

From: Ambassador Sato

Treaty of Peace and Friendship between Japan and China Negotiations (5th Meeting – Part 1)

No. 1433 Secret Top Urgent

(Limited Distribution)

Re: Outgoing Telegram No. 1407

On the afternoon of the 27th, from 3 until 6 o’clock, for a period of three hours (including a break period of 40 minutes), we held the fifth meeting. A summary of its main points is as follows: (The place of the meeting and the participants were the same as for the first meeting.)

1. Vice Minister Han, after starting by saying that he wished to speak first and asking for our side’s understanding, said the following on the basis of a text prepared in advance.

(1) The Ambassador spoke in the meeting the day before yesterday of the Japanese side’s thinking in regard to the Chinese side’s statement of the 24th. We considered the Ambassador’s statement seriously and in detail. As I said at the end of the meeting the day before yesterday, the gap between us on the main issue, that is to say, the issue of the anti-hegemony clause, is still very large. There are also a number of points that the Ambassador made with which we cannot agree. I would now like to state the Chinese side’s thinking.

(2) First, then, I will speak concerning the issue that “This treaty is not directed against any specific third country.” The Chinese side has repeatedly made clear its view regarding the relationship between the concluding of the China-Japan Treaty of Peace and Friendship and third countries. It is: 1. China and Japan’s concluding a treaty and solidifying and developing the relations of peace and friendship between our two countries is not prejudicial to the interests of third countries. 2. The China-Japan Treaty of Peace and Friendship, incorporating the anti-hegemony clause, first binds both China and Japan; at the same time, it is directed against any third country that seeks hegemony or attempt it. By no means is it directed against any country that does not seek hegemony. 3. The concluding of a treaty between China and Japan is the affair of our two countries. By no means can we accept any faulting or willful disturbance of it by any third country.

(3) Unfortunately, however, this view of the Chinese side even now has not obtained the correct understanding of the Japanese side. The Ambassador in his statement the day before yesterday was still adhering to the expression, “This treaty is not directed against any specific third country,” and saying that this declaration of the Japanese side was not a self-contradiction with opposition to hegemony. However, the anti-hegemony clause is one of the main contents of the China-Japan Treaty of Peace and Friendship, so it goes without saying that the Japanese side’s “this treaty” is a matter of course and contained in the anti-hegemony clause.

(4) Frankly speaking, it is clear to anyone that the Japanese side’s replacing the subject “This is not directed against any third country” with “this treaty,” is an attempt to say that the anti-hegemony clause is not directed against any third country. We have explained that if there is the aspect of the anti-hegemony clause not being directed against any third country, there is also the aspect of its being directed. The Japanese side, too, in its statement of the 25th recognized there being to opposition to hegemony the aspect of direction against a third country. Clearly, is it not a self-contradiction to recognize on the one hand that the anti-hegemony clause has an aspect of direction against a third country while, on the other hand, saying that “this treaty,” which contains the main content of the anti-hegemony clause, “is not directed against any third country”?

(5) Perhaps the Japanese side would say that the Japanese side’s declaration is “not directed against any specific third country,” but the declaration “This treaty is not directed against any specific third country” is self-contradictory and illogical, so we cannot agree with it. In the same way, we cannot agree with the declaration “it is not directed against any third country.” As we clearly said in our statement of the 22nd, the Japanese side’s “any specific third country” is a synonym for the Soviet Union. This is common knowledge at present, so there is no need for further explanation.

(6) In the Ambassador’s statements of the 24th and 25th, you emphasized repeatedly that opposition to hegemony must not specify in advance a certain third country and that, if there were someone seeking hegemony, no matter whom, one would be opposed to it. It sounds reasonable but, in thinking about it, one understands that such thinking does not hold up. As we see it, the problem of specifying in advance simply does not exist. Is it not clear to everyone who it is now who is in the Asia-Pacific region seeking hegemony; who is attempting it; who, relying on force, is always threatening others; and who is arbitrarily and unreasonably pushing upon others its own ideas?

(7) The Sino-Japanese Joint Statement’s stipulated principle of opposition to hegemony is not at all some specified fabrication subjectively made up in advance. The Chinese side is facing the realistic threat of hegemonism. The Ambassador said on the 24th that he was under no illusion as to the source of the real threat to Japan. As a third country really is threatening us, how could one speak of specifying in advance a certain third country? Why would one not face reality while being clearly threatened? Of course, China does not intend to suggest that the Japanese side unreasonably accept all the Chinese side’s viewpoints on the issue of opposition to hegemony. Joint action, military alliance, and the like are all the more out of the question. However, maintaining and defending the spirit and principle of the Joint Statement is the common responsibility of our two sides. The Chinese side will absolutely not retreat from the Joint Statement’s position.

(8) In sum, the Chinese side cannot agree with the declarations “this treaty” and “any specific country” in Sentence 1, Article 3 of the Japanese draft. What I would like to explain carefully to the Japanese side is that this by no means relates to an issue of phrasing but a real issue of whether or not to truly adhere to the principle of opposition to hegemony, a real issue pertaining to maintaining and defending the spirit and substance of the Sino-Japanese Joint Statement and an issue of a determination to truly improve relations between China and Japan. What I am telling the Ambassador and Japanese friends is that there is no room for the Chinese side to compromise in this kind of issue of principle. Speaking clearly and to the point, have not negotiations been moving at a snail’s pace and not progressing for more than three years due to none other than this issue? I request that the Japanese side seriously reexamine our view.

(9) Next, in regard to the issue of “oppose” and “opposed to” and that of adding the expression “any other region” after “the Asia-Pacific region,” I think that the Japanese side well knows the Chinese side’s thinking after the Chinese side’s statement of the 24th, so I will not repeat it here.

(10) Before ending my statement, I will state a little more my view and request the Japanese side’s consideration of it. We should recognize that the differences on the anti-hegemony issue are still very large and, at the same time, that there are quite a few points in common between us. We hope, for the sake of negotiations progressing more effectively, that the Japanese side, when considering the views of the Chinese side, really do so on the basis of the Sino-Japanese Joint Statement, put effort into expanding points in common in seeking common ground while putting away differences, find solutions, and put forth a sound and practical new draft.

2. After the end of Vice Minister Han’s statement, I proposed a break. We then went on break for approximately 40 minutes.

3. After the break, I spoke as follows:

We listened attentively to Vice Minister Han’s statement just now. Regrettably, however, as it is thought that the Japanese side’s thinking has not been fully understood by the Chinese side, I will speak briefly of our side’s thinking in repeating the two views that we consider the most important.

First, Vice Minister Han said that it is clear that replacing the subject of Sentence 1, Article 3 with “this treaty” is an attempt to say that it is not directed against any third country. However, as I said on the 25th, we adopt a position of opposition to any country that seeks hegemony or attempts it, which does not at all contradict the treaty itself not being directed against any specific third country. In other words, this treaty’s not being directed against any specific third country is consistent with the condition of the anti-hegemony clause’s containing the aspect of direction against a third country. Furthermore, speaking clearly, I think that in the case of a country that seeks hegemony, opposition to such an attempt and specifying in advance a third country and confronting it are not the same thing.

Second, concerning “any specific,” Vice Minister Han said that it is clear who now in Asia seeks hegemony or is attempting it. I am not thinking here to debate the perception of the actual world situation. However, this treaty is something to widely sing at the top of one’s voice: a treaty of peace and friendship between Japan and China that should be passed down from generation to generation. Considering this, we cannot here consider in regard to the principle of opposition to hegemony its application to the Soviet Union alone. I think it necessary to make clear that, if there were any country seeking hegemony, we would oppose it. The Japanese proposal truly makes this point clear.

(End)

JAPANESE (TRANSCRIPTION) HTML

極秘

総番号 (TA) R054127  5355  主管

78年  月27日23時55分  中国発

78年07月28日01時24分  本省着  ア局長

外務大臣殿  佐藤大使

日中平和友好条約交渉(第5回会談-その1)

第1433号 極秘 大至急

(限定配布)

往電第1407号に関し

27日午後3時から6時まで3時間(40分の休けい時間を含む)にわたり第5回会談を行なつたところ、概要次のとおり。(会談の場所及び出席者は第1回会談に同じ。)

1.韓副部長は、冒頭、本日は自分から先に発言したいとして、わが方の了解を求めた後あらかじめ用意した原こうに基づき次のとおり述べた。

(1)大使は一昨日の会談において中国側の24日の発言に対し、日本側の考え方を述べた。私たちは大使の発言を真けん、かつ詳細に検討した。私が一昨日の会談の終りに述べたように、私たちは主要な問題、すなわち反は権条項の問題における私たち双方の開きがまだ非常に大きいものであり、大使のいくつかの論点も私たちの同意できないものと考えている。ただ今から中国側の考え方を述べたい。

(2)先ず最初に「この条約は、特定の第三国に対して向けられたものではない。」との問題についてである。中日平和友好条約の締結と第三国との関係については、中国側は再三見解を明らかにしている。これはつまり、第1に、中日両国が条約を締結し両国間の平和友好関係を強固にし発展させることは、第三国の利益を損なうものではないこと、第2に、反は権条項を盛り込んだ中日平和友好条約は、先ず中日双方をこう束するものであると同時に、は権を求めており、あるいは求めようとする第三国にも対するものであるが、決しては権を求めないものに対するものではないこと、第3に、中日両国が条約を締結することは中日両国のことがらであり、決して第三国からとやかく言われたり勝手にかく乱されたりすることなど容認できないこと、である。

(3)しかし残念なことは、上述の中国側の見解は未だ日本側の正しい理解を得ていないことである。大使は、一昨日の発言でもなお「この条約は特定の第三国に対して向けられたものではない」という表現をけん持しており、また、は権反対と日本側のこの表現は自家どう着するものではないと言つた。しかし反は権条項は中日平和友好条約の1つの重要な内容なので、日本側のいう「この条約」は当然反は権条項を含むことは言うまでもないことである。

(4)日本側が「第三国に対して向けらたものではない」との主語を「この条約」にとりかえたことは、たん的に言うと、反は権条項が第三国に対するものではないと言おうとしついることはだれの目にも明らかである。私たちは反は権条項は第三国に対するものではないという面もあれば、対する面もあると説明している。日本側も25日の発言の中で、は権反対には第三国を対象とする面があることを認めている。一方では反は権条項が第三国に対する面もあることを認めていながら、他方では反は権条項という重要な内容を含めた「この条約」は「第三国に対して向けられたものではない」ということは、明らかに自家どう着しているものではなかろうか。

(5)恐らく日本側は、日本側の表現は「特定の第三国に対して向けられたものではない」であると言うかも知れないが、「この条約は、第三国に対して向けられたものではない」という表現が自家どう着であり論理に合わないから私たちは同意できないと同様に、「特定の第三国に対して向けられたものではない」という表現にも私たちは同意できない。私たちは22日の発言の中ではつきり申し上げたように日本側のいう「特定の第三国」は他でもなくソ連の代名しのことであり、このことは今日衆知のことであるから、これ以上説明するまでもない。

(6)大使は、24日及び25日の発言の中で再三は権反対はあらかじめある第三国を特定するものであつてはならず、もしは権を求めるものがあればだれであれそれに反対であると強調した。これにはいくらかの道理があるように聞こえるが、よく考えてみると、こうした考えは全く成り立たないことが分る。私たちからみると、あらかじめ特定するという問題は全く存在しない。当面アジア・太平洋地域においては権を求めており、は権を求めようとする者がだれであり、実力に頼つていつも他人をおどし、横望{前2文字ママ}かつ理不じんに自らの意思を強引に他人に押しつけているのはだれであるか、だれにもはつきりしているのではなかろうか。

(7)中日共同声明の規定したは権反対の原則は、決してあらかじめ特定し主観的に作り上げたきよ構のものに対して言つたのではない。中国側は、は権主義の現実的きよういに直面している。大使は24日の発言の中でも日本は現実のきよういがどこからくるかについては何らげん想をいだいていないと言つた。第三国が現実にわれわれをおびやかしている以上、どうしてわれわれは予めある第三国を特定するということを言えるのであろうか。明らかにおびやかされていながら、どうしてこの現実を直視しようとしないのか。もち論、中国はは権反対の問題において、中国側のあらゆる観点を日本側に無理に受入れるよう勧めるつもりはない。共同行動とか軍事同盟は、なおそら問題外のことである。しかし、共同声明の精しんと原則を維持し守ることは双方の共通の責任である。共同声明の立場から後退することは、中国側は絶対しない。

(8)要するに、日本側草案の第3項第1文の「この条約」と「特定の第三国」の表現は、中国側は決して同意できるものではない。私から再び日本側にしん重に説明したいのは、これが関連しているのは、決して文字上の表現の問題ではなく、真には権反対の原則をけん持するかどうかの実質的問題であり、中日共同声明の精しんと実質を維持し守ることに係る実質的問題であるので、真に中日関係をより良くする決意に係る問題である。大使及び日本の友人に申し上げるのは、このような原則上の問題には中国側には妥協の余地がないこと、言ばをにごさずはつきり言うと、3年余の条約交渉が遅々として進展しなかつたのは、他でもなくこの問題のためではなかつたか。日本側において私たちの意見を真けんに再検討するようお願いする。

(9)次に「反対する」と「反対である」という問題及び「アジア・太平洋地域」の後に「他のいずれの地域」の表現を付け加える問題については、中国側の24日の発言を通して日本側は中国側の考え方と主張を十分知つていると思うので、ここではくり返さないこととする。

(10)私の発言を終える前に、もう少し意見を申し述べて日本側の検討をお願いしたい。反は権問題における意見のくい違いがまだ非常に大きいことを認めると同時に、双方の共通点も少なくないことを見てとるべきである。交渉をより効果的に進めるため日本側が中国側の意見を検討するに際し、実際に則して中日共同声明を基礎にし、小異を残して大同を求め共通点の拡大に力を入れ、問題の解決策を見出し、確実で実行可能な新しい案文を提出するよう希望する。

2.韓副部長の発言終了後、本使より休けいを提案し、休けいに入り、約40分間休けいした。

3.休けい後、本使より次のとおり述べた。

われわれは、ただ今の韓副部長の御発言を注意深くうかがつた。ただ、残念ながら、日本側の考え方が十分に中国側に了解されていないように思われるので、最も重要と思われる意見二つにつきくり返して簡単にわが方の考え方を述べる。

 第一に、韓副部長は第3条第1文の主語に「この条約は」に取りかえることは、反は権条項が第3国に対するものではないことを言おうとしていることは明らかだといわれた。しかしながら、25日にも述べたとおり、は権を求めまたは求めようとする国がある場合にそのような試みに反対する立場をとることと、この条約自体が特定の第3国に対して向けられていないということはなんらむじゆんしない。言いかえれば、この条約が特定の第3国に向けられていないということは、反は権条項が第3国を対象とする面を含むということと両立する事がらである。更にはつきり言えば、は権を求める国がある場合に、そのような試みに反対であることと、予め第3国を特定してこれと対決することとは同じことではないと考える。

 第二に、「特定の」について、韓副部長は、当面アジアでは権を求めまたは求めようとしている者がだれかは明らかだと言われた。私はここで現実の国際情勢の認識を論じようとは思わない。しかし、この条約は、子々そんそんまで伝えられるべき日中両国間の平和友好関係をひろくうたい上げるものである。そのことを考えれば、われわれはここでは権反対の原則について、これがソ連のみにあてはまるものと考えてはならず、は権を求める国があればだれであれ、これに反対することを明らかにする必要があると思う。日本案はまさにこの点を明確にしているものである。

(了)

ORIGINAL SCAN PDF

It appears your Web browser is not configured to display PDF files. No worries, just click here to download the PDF file.

Click here to view the PDF file in a new window.

PDFs cannot be printed inline in the page. To print a PDF, you must first download the file and open it in a PDF viewer.