Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

August 01, 1978

CABLE NO. 1464, AMBASSADOR SATO TO THE FOREIGN MINISTER, 'TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA NEGOTIATIONS (7TH MEETING)'

CITATION SHARE DOWNLOAD
  • Citation

    get citation

    The delegations discuss word choice and what policy sentiments should be in the treaty.
    "Cable No. 1464, Ambassador Sato to the Foreign Minister, 'Treaty of Peace and Friendship between Japan and China Negotiations (7th Meeting)'," August 01, 1978, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, 2010-367, Act on Access to Information Held by Administrative Organs. Also available at the Diplomatic Archives of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan. Contributed by Yutaka Kanda and translated by Stephen Mercado. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/220010
  • share document

    https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/220010

VIEW DOCUMENT IN

English HTML

Number: (TA) R054921     5425

Primary: Asian Affairs Bureau Director-General

Sent: China, August 01, 1978,  00:30

Received: MOFA, August 01, 1978,  02:13

To: The Foreign Minister      

From: Ambassador Sato

Treaty of Peace and Friendship between Japan and China Negotiations (7th Meeting)

No. 1464 Secret Top Urgent

(Limited Distribution)

Re: Outgoing Telegram No. 1448

On the 31st, the seventh meeting took place for two hours and 20 minutes, from 3:00 to 5:20 pm (including a break period of approximately 35 minutes from 3:45). A summary of its main points is as follows: (place and participants were the same as at the first meeting)

1. At the start, Vice Minister Han said: It is my turn to host the meeting, but I would like to talk with you about which of us speaks first. I thus requested to speak first. I spoke as per separate telegram.

2. In response, Vice Minister Han spoke from a text prepared in advance as follows:

(1) Since the start of treaty negotiations, three and a half years have passed. Eleven days have passed since the start of these talks here. I have never doubted that friends of the Japanese side hope for an agreement in these negotiations. I believe that everyone – from former Ambassador Ogawa to Ambassador Sato, and from the Minister of Foreign Affairs to all the colleagues at the Embassy of Japan in Beijing – is hoping for this treaty’s early conclusion.

(2) Today is the eleventh day since these negotiations started on the 21st. To date, we have held five plenary meetings and one unofficial meeting. Both the Chinese and Japanese sides have expressed relatively fully their respective viewpoints and positions and have seriously examined the views of the other side. Above all, we have carried out a relatively thorough searching of views on the issue of the anti-hegemony clause. This is useful for promoting mutual understanding and beneficial as well for more deeply discussing the treaty negotiations.

(3) Accordingly, one can say that the meetings to date have been significant and have obtained results, so we should acknowledge that. Of course, this is the result of efforts on both sides. However, speaking from a spirit of seeking what is right on the basis of fact,  the difference of opinion of our two sides on the issue of the anti-hegemony clause is still very large. At the same time, we should recognize that there are also, after all, not a few points in common.

(4) The Ambassador, in the unofficial meeting of the 28th, enumerated five points common to both sides. The Chinese side has examined and analyzed the statements these past few days. I would like to speak of these points in common, which I have put together and organized.

(a) First, the Chinese and Japanese sides, in concluding the treaty of peace and friendship, strengthening and developing the relations of peace and friendship between both countries, do not intend to prejudice the interests of third countries

(b) Second, neither the Chinese nor the Japanese side seeks hegemony. Both sides oppose any third country or group of countries that seeks hegemony. Both sides oppose anyone who seeks hegemony.

(c) Third, both the Chinese and Japanese sides have the desire to maintain and develop good-neighborly and friendly relations with all countries but have no choice but to resist those that seek hegemony.

(d) Fourth, the Chinese side and the Japanese side has adopted its own independent diplomatic policy and will not interfere in the internal affairs of the other.   Neither side will be affected by external forces unhappy with the conclusion of the China-Japan Treaty of Peace and Friendship.

(e) Fifth, both sides feel the existence of a real threat. In regard to such a threat, the Chinese side does not think that it comes from Japan, and the Japanese side does not think that it comes from China.

(5) Each of our two sides has five points for its assembled points in common but, in view of a part of their contents, there remain differences in the opinions of our two sides. To offer and explain one example, in the fourth point of the Japanese side, in regard to “this treaty does not name the Soviet Union,” the name of the Soviet Union does not appear, whether in the Sino-Japanese Joint Statement or in the China-Japan Treaty of Peace and Friendship,. No country whatsoever is named, so would it not be that it not even a question of naming the Soviet Union? One could say that this is less a point in common to our two sides than it is a place where there exists a difference of opinion between our two sides. This point of the Japanese side is not one with which we can agree.

(6) As I said in the meeting of the 27th, we recognize that there exist differences of opinion on both sides and, at the same time, the objective of affirming the points in common to both sides lies in finding a solution in focusing on the overall situation, expanding points in common, and reducing differences in opinion on the basis of the Sino-Japanese Joint Statement. Therefore, we look forward now, too, to the Japanese side continuing to put forth a definitely feasible new treaty draft.

3. Following Vice Minister Han’s statement, both sides proposed taking a break, then took a break of approximately 35 minutes.

4. After the meeting resumed, Vice Minister Han said the following as the statement of the Chinese side:

(1) Ambassador Sato, in your statement some time ago, you said that it was necessary to put the thinking of Japan’s diplomatic policy in this treaty. As we see it, however, whether we speak of the joint statement or the treaty between our two countries, both must reflect the points in common or points of agreement of both sides. If not, with one side demanding the reflection of its own diplomatic policy in the treaty and the other side demanding the reflection of its own policy, it would only serve to complicate the issue.

(2) For example, the Sino-Japanese Joint Statement, announced on September 29, 1972, is a document that reflects the points in common to the Chinese and Japanese sides. If only we truly held firm to the principle of the Joint Statement and made a basis of the Joint Statement, the issue would not be a difficult one to settle.

(3) The Ambassador having said that it is necessary to put the thinking of Japan’s diplomatic policy in this treaty, what I would like to ask here is: What new idea or concrete view is there on the Japanese side?

5. In response, I said the following:

(1) There are two points that I would like to raise in regard to Vice Minister Han’s statement. First,  Vice Minister Han spoke of Japan’s “diplomatic diplomacy,” but what I mentioned some time ago was “what emerges from Japan’s diplomatic posture.” Accordingly, it does not have the same kind of meaning as pressing diplomatic policy itself. However, Vice Minister Han stated that he understands that posture as Japan’s desire. I said that we would like to talk with the Chinese side regarding the thinking that comes from this.

(2) The second issue is that Vice Minister Han asked whether the Japanese side intended to put forth some new proposal. I would say that, in these negotiations, the Japanese side has already put forth a draft that we consider ideal. Therefore, as I requested some time ago, I would like to have from the Chinese side a proposal in a form that the Chinese side could accept.

(3) So, as I think you probably noticed, in the statement that I made some time ago, I said that it was “necessary to put somewhere in the treaty this sort of (as in Sentence 1 of Article 3) thinking.” Please take note of it.

6. In response, Vice Minister Han said the following:

(1) I only raised one issue. A little while ago Your Excellency the Ambassador said that it was “necessary to put the thinking of Japan’s diplomatic policy in this treaty,” but if we are going to have something reflected in the treaty, we must have reflected something from both the Japanese and Chinese sides. For example, the Japan-China Joint Communique at least reflects the points in common to the views of both sides. It has to be the same as our having handled relations between our two countries since the announcement of the Joint Communique on the principle and foundation of this document.

(2) Of course, I understand that the Ambassador saying that he would like to see Japan’s policy reflected in the treaty is not saying that we will not reflect the Chinese side’s view in it.

(3) I am asking the Ambassador whether he has some concrete idea or view on how we would reflect it.

7. In response, I answered as follows:

Just now Vice Minister Han used the words “Japan’s diplomatic policy,” but the words “diplomatic policy” are off the mark. In any case, writing into the treaty something reflecting Japan’s thinking is, naturally, only possible with the agreement of the Chinese side. It is also the case that Japan can also, naturally, write into the treaty the Chinese side’s thinking with which we can agree. Accordingly, in whether to write in this point or not, we have absolutely no intention of pressing something that the Chinese side finds objectionable. For the Japanese side, it would be better to have something, so I would like to ask what could obtain the agreement of the Chinese side.

8. In response, Vice Minister Han spoke as follows:

(1) I understood what the Japanese side said regarding “diplomatic posture.” In short, I think that there is no problem regarding writing it into the treaty if each side practices its own respective diplomatic policy and neither interferes in the internal affairs of the other. We will reflect in an equal and identical way each side’s diplomatic policy. It would be something like this, right?

(2) Some time ago the Ambassador spoke of reflecting diplomatic posture. (At this point he asked what “shisei” was in English; I answered, “posture.”) Accordingly, if you have some concrete idea there, I would like to ask what it is.

9. In response, I said: “Some time ago I asked the Chinese side to put forth something because our side had put out a draft that we thought ideal. The Chinese side said regarding the Japanese side’s draft that it would not work as is, so I would like to ask what kind of form the Chinese side’s thinks would be good.

Vice Minister Han then said: I think that it would be no problem to examine the Japanese side’s draft and, at the same time, to pull together the Chinese side’s thinking and put forth a draft that could be considered ideal by both the Japanese and Chinese sides.  However, the issue that is a headache and troublesome, the focus, is the phrase in Sentence 1, Article 3, of the Japanese side’s treaty draft: “This treaty is not directed against any specific third country.” This is a point where each side has a different view.  This has become the main issue.

10. In response, I said: The Japanese side, too, feels absolutely the same way concerning it being the main point. Accordingly, it is not a case of here or there in the treaty. I would like, then, to have the Chinese side in regard to this point make a proposal on which we could agree. Vice Minister Han then repeated: “The issue is Sentence 1, Article 3 of the Japanese side’s draft.” After that, he said: “As I have said repeatedly already, we cannot agree with such a statement of the Japanese side. If you do not adopt this way of expressing it, we should discuss together finding a way out (note: chulu).

11. Hearing this, I said the following:

This is an odd allegory for it, but this is like a school student answering a teacher’s question. The student has given what he thinks is the best answer, but the teacher tells him it is wrong and tells him to give him a new one. It is impossible for the student, although told to do so, to give a new answer. It is impossible if the teacher does not tell the student where the problem is, because the student himself put together what he thought was the best answer.

12. In response, Vice Minister Han said the following as an added point:

This is my proposal, and another idea. The issue of the anti-hegemony clause’s first sentence, “This treaty is not directed against any specific third country,” is not simply something that we have disputed these past few days but something that we have disputed these past few years. The only thing different recently is the insertion of the term “particular.” In these past few days, both sides in their statements have repeatedly said “we will oppose anyone who seeks hegemony, no matter whom.” I think that this is the unanimous position of both sides. To put it the other way, it is not directed against any country or group of countries that does not seek hegemony. However, it means that it is directed against any country or group of countries that seeks hegemony.  The expression of Sentence 1, Article 3, of the Japanese side’s draft does not reflect this viewpoint upon which both sides have agreed.

If the Japanese side wants to hold firm to making “this treaty” the subject, we propose putting it in the rear of the anti-hegemony clause. That is to say,  our proposal is to place this sentence from the original Chinese draft, “Both sides state once more that our two countries should not seek hegemony in the Asia-Pacific region and will oppose any country or group of countries that seeks to establish hegemony,” in the front of the sentence with “this treaty” as the subject. Then, we would change the sentence with “this treaty” as the subject to “This treaty is not directed against any third country that does not seek hegemony. (Ben tiaoyue bu shi zhen dui bumouqiu baquan de disanguo/本条約不是針対不謀求覇権的第三国)]. How would that be?

13. In response, I said: “Thank you for your statement. This is something new, and it is an important proposal, so I would like to fully examine it and give you our answer at tomorrow’s meeting. Vice Minister Han then replied that that was “fine.” I then verified to the effect: “I would like to ask the Chinese side’s thinking on discussing issues other than the anti-hegemony clause.”

14. In response, Vice Minister Han said the following:

As I said in my last statement, the main issue is the anti-hegemony clause. It is not that there are no differences of opinion on the other issues, but they are not difficult to resolve. In other words, they are issues that are easy to resolve.

I think that the point common to both sides is “We will oppose anyone who seeks hegemony, no matter whom.” This actually conforms with, and faithfully expresses, the spirit of the Sino-Japanese Joint Statement. This is a point in common with which the Japanese side, too, agreed. Accordingly, wherever in the treaty appears Sentence 1, Article 3, of the Japanese draft, it is prejudicial to the principle and substance of the Joint Statement, and we cannot agree with it. To do so would be a retreat from the basis of the Joint Statement.

15. In response, I said, “Unable to obtain agreement on the point of discussing issues other than that of the anti-hegemony clause, I will not raise it any more.” Vice Minister Han then stated: “I would like to discuss issues other than the anti-hegemony clause after this. In any case, tomorrow I would like to hear from the Japanese side a response to today’s proposal  of the Chinese side.” I therefore said in conclusion: “I would like to respond at tomorrow’s meeting to the Chinese side’s statement prior to today’s break and to the Chinese side’s proposal following that break. Both sides agreed to hold the eighth meeting tomorrow at 3 pm. The meeting then ended.

(End)

JAPANESE (TRANSCRIPTION) HTML

極秘

総番号 (TA) R054921  5425  主管

78年  月01日00時30分  中国発

78年08月01日02時13分  本省着  アジア局長

外務大臣殿  佐藤大使

日中平和友好条約交渉(第7回会談)

第1464号 極秘 大至急

(限定配布)

往電第1448号に関し

 31日午後3時より5時20分まで2時間20分にわたり(3時45分より約35分間の休けいも含む)第7回会談を行つたところ、その概要次のとおり。

(場所及び出席者は、第1回会談に同じ)

1.冒頭、韓副部長は、本日の会談は私の主さいする番であるがどちらが先に発言するか相談したいと述べたので、本使より先に発言することを求め、別電の{前3文字で囲む}のとおり述べた。

2.これに対し、韓副部長は、予め用意された原こうに基づき次のとおり述べた。

(1)条約交渉の開始以来、時間的には3年半経過した。今回の交渉も始まつてから本日で11日目である。私は、日本側の友人がこの交渉の妥結を希望していることを疑つたことはない。小川前大使からサトウ大使まで、また、外務省の同僚から北京の日本大使館の同僚のみな様方に至るまでこの条約の早期締結を希望していると信じている。

(2)今回の交渉が21日に開始されてから本日で11日目になる。これまで私たちは、5回の全体会談と1回の非公式会談を行つた。中日双方は、割合十分にそれぞれの観点と立場を表明し、相手側の意見を真けんに検討し、就中、反は権条項の問題において割合突つ込んだ意見のたん求と討議を行つた。これは、相互理解の増進に役立ち、条約交渉を更に深く討議することにとつても有益である。

(3)従つて、今までの会談は有意義であり、成果を収めたものであると言えるので、それをこう定すべきである。もち論、これは双方の努力の結果である。しかし、事実に基づいてぜを求めるという精しんから言えば反は権条項の問題における双方の意見の違いは、今なお非常の大きいものである。同時に双方の共通点もやはり少なくないことを見てとるべきである。

(4)大使は、28日の非公式会談で、双方の共通点を5つ列挙された。私は、ここで中国側が数日来の発言を検討し分せきした上で、これをまとめ、整理した双方の共通点を述べたい。

(イ)第1に、中日双方は、平和友好条約を締結し、両国間の平和友好関係を強固にし発展させることによつて第三国の利益を損うつもりはない。

(ロ)第2に、中日双方ともは権を求めず、いかなる第三国または国の集団がは権を求めることにも反対する。は権を求めるのもには、だれであろうと反対する。

(ハ)第3に、中日双方ともすべての国と善りん友好関係を維持し発展させる願望を持つているが、は権を求めるものに対しては反攻する他ない。

(ニ)第4に、中日双方ともそれぞれ独立自主の外交政策をとつており、相手側の内政に干渉しない。双方とも中日友好条約の締結をよろこばしく思わない外部勢力から影響されない。

(ホ)第5に双方とも現実のきよういが存在していることを感じ、こうしたきよういについては中国側は日本から来るものと思わないし、日本側も中国から来るものであるとは思わない。

(5)私たち双方がそれぞれまとめた共通点は、いずれも5点あるが、そのうち一部の内容からみると、双方の意見はまだ食い違いがある。一つの例をあげて説明すれば、日本側の第4点、すなわち、「この条約はソ連を名指すものではない」ことについては、中日共同声明にせよ、中日平和友好条約にせよ、ソ連という国名が出ていないし、如何なる国家も名指していないから、ソ連を名指しているということは話にもならないことではなかろうか。これは、私たち双方の共通点であるというより、これこそ私たち双方の意見の食い違いの存在する所であると言える。日本側のこの点は、私たちが同意できるものではない。

(6)私が27日の会談において述べたように、私たちは、双方の意見の食い違いが存在していることを認めていると同時に、双方の共通点をこう定する目的は、中日共同声明の基礎の上に立つて、大局から着がんし、共通点を拡大し、意見の相違点を縮少して解決策を見出すところにあるので、私たちは、日本側が引き続き確実に実行可能な新しい条約案を提出されるよう今も期待している。

3.以上の韓副部長の発言の後、双方とも休けいすることとし、約35分間休けいした。

4.会談再開後、韓副部長は、中国側から発言するとして次のとおり述べた。

(1)先程のサトウ大使の発言の中に日本の外交政策の思想を、この条約の中に入れる必要があると言われたが、私たちから見れば、両国間の声明であれ条約であれ、いずれも双方の共通点または一致点を反えいするものでなければならない。もしそうではなく一方が自らの外交政策を条約の中に反えいさせることを要求し、他方も自らの政策を反えいさせることを要求するならば、問題を複雑にするだけである。

(2)例えば、1972年9月29日に発表された中日共同声明は、中日双方の共通点を反えいする文書であり、われわれは真に共同声明の原則をけん持し、共同声明を基礎とすることさえするならば、問題は解決し難いものではない。

(3)大使が、日本の外交政策の思想を条約の中に入れることを必要とすると言われた以上、ここで私が質問したことは、日本側に何か新しい具体的な考えあるいは具体的な意見があるということなのであろうか。

5.これに対し、本使より、次のとおり述べた。

(1)ただ今の韓副部長の発言に対し、私から申し上げたいことは2点ある。第1に、韓副部長は、日本の「外交政策」と言われたが、私が先程発言したのは「日本外交のし勢から出てくるものである」と述べたのである。従つて外交政策そのものを押しつけるというような意味ではない。しかしそのし勢を韓副部長は日本の願望として理解する旨述べられており、ここから出てくる考え方について中国側と話をしたいということを申し上げたわけである。

(2)第2の問題は、韓副部長が何か新しい提案を日本側から提出するつもりであるかと言われたが、私の方から言えば今回の交渉において、日本側から理想的なものと考える草案を既に提出したので、先程私の方からお願いしたように、こういう形なら中国側が受け入れられるというような提案を中国側からしていただきたいと希望する。

(3)それから恐らく気付かれたと思うが、先程の私の発言の中に、「このような(第3条第1文のような)思想を条文のどこかに入れることを必要とする」と述べたことに御留意願いたい。

6.これに対し韓副部長は、次のとおり述べた。

(1)私が提起した問題は、1つだけである。先程大使閣下が「日本の外交政策の思想を条約の中に書き入れることが必要である」旨述べられたが、もしも条約の中に何かを反えいさせるというのなら、日中双方のものを反えいさせなければならない。例えば日中共同声明は少なくとも私たち双方の意見の共通点を反えいしており、共同声明が発表されて以来この文書の原則と基礎に基づき両国関係を処理してきたのと同じでなければならない。

(2)もち論私は、大使の言われたこの条約の中に日本の政策を反えいさせたいということは中国側の意見を反えいさせないということではないと理解する。

(3)私はどういうふうに反えいさせたらいいかにつき大使の方に何か具体的な考えあるいは具体的な意見があるかということをたずねているのである。

7.これに対し本使より次のとおり答えた。

先ほど韓副部長は「日本の外交政策」という言ばを使われたが、「外交政策」という言ばは当らない。いずれにせよ日本の考え方を反えいしたものを条約の中に書き入れるということは当然中国側が同意しない限りできない。日本としても中国側の考えの中でわれわれが同意できるものは当然条約に書き入れることができるわけだ。従つてこの点を書き入れるか否かということで中国側が、いやだというものを押しつけるつもりは全然ない。日本側とすれば何かあつた方がいいので中国側はどういうものなら同意を得られるかうかがいたい。

8.これに対し韓副部長は次のとおり述べた。

(1)日本側が「外交し勢」と言われたことについては分つた。つまり、これを条約の中に書き入れるということについては双方がそれぞれ自この外交政策を実行し、それぞれの内政に干渉しないということであれば問題ないと思う。双方の外交政策を平等かつ同様に条約の中に反えいさせる。このようなことであろうか。

(2)先ほど大使は外交し勢を反えいさせると言われた。(ここで「し勢」とは英語で何というのかと問うたのでPOSTUREだと答えた。)従つてもし何か具体的な考え方があればお聞きしたい。

9.これに対し本使より、「先ほど私は、わが方として理想的だと考える草案を出したのであるから今度は中国側から出していただきたい。中国側は日本側案に対しこれでは具合が悪いと言うのであるから、それではどのような形にすればよいのか中国側の考えを聞きたい」と述べたところ、韓副部長は次のとおり述べた。

私たちは日本側の草案を検討すると同時に中国側の考えをまとめ日中双方とも理想的と考えられる草案を提出することは問題ないと思う。ただ現在頭のいたいやつかいな、しよう点となつている問題は、日本側条約草案第3条第1文の「この条約は特定の国に対して向けられたものではない」との字くにつき双方の意見が食い違つている点であり、これが主要な問題点となつている。

10.これに対し本使より、「日本側もそれが主要点であるということについては全く同感である。従つて条約のどこも、ここもという訳ではなく、その点について中国側としてこれなら同意できるという提案をしていただきたいと思う」と述べたところ、韓副部長は、再び「問題は日本側草案の第3条第1文にある。」とくり返した上「日本側のこのような表現方法は既に何回も述べたとおり同意できない。もしこの表現方法をとらないで、どんな方途(注:出路)をさがし出せるかは互に相談すればよい」と述べた。

11.これを受けて本使より次のとおり述べた。

みようなたとえ話をするが、学校の生とが先生に答案を提出したとする。生ととしては一番よいと考えるものを出したのに先生は、これではダメだからもう一度新しいのを出せという。こう言われても生とにとつては新しい答案を出すことは無理である。先生のほうからどこが悪いかを言わぬと生とは自分が一番よいと思つて作つているから無理である。

12.これに対し韓副部長は、少し付け加える点があるとして次のとおり述べた。これは私の提案または一つの考え方である。「この条約は特定の第三国に対し向けられたものではない」という反は権条項第1文の問題は、単にこの数日来論争してきたものではなく、ここ数年来論争してきたものである。ただ最近違つた点はこの条項に「特定の」という言ばが入つたことである。ここ数日来、双方ともその発言の中でくり返し「は権を求めるものがあれば、だれであれ反対する」と言つており、これは双方の一致した立場であると思う。逆に言えば、は権を求めない国あるいは国の集団に対し向けられたものではないということである。しかし、は権を求める国あるいは国の集団に対し向けられたものであると言うことである。日本側草案第3条第1文の表現は、双方がこのように一致した観点を反えいしていない。

もしも日本側が「この条約は」を主語とすることをけん持したいというのであれば、われわれはこれをは権反対条項の後方に置くことを提案する。すなわち「双方は両国のいずれもアジア・太平洋地域においては権を求めるべきではなく、このような、は権を確立しようとする他のいかなる国あるいは国の集団による試みにも反対することを重ねて表明する。」との元々の中国案のこの文を「本条約は」を主語とする文の前に持つて来るという提案である。そして「この条約は」を主語とする文は「この条約はは権を求めない第三国に対し向けられたものではない。(本条約不ゼ針対不謀求は権的第三国)」と改めてはどうであろうか。

13.これに対し本使より、「御発言を感謝する。これは新らしい話であるし、重大な提案でもあるので十分検討し、明日の会談ででもわれわれの回答を行ないたい」と述べたところ、韓副部長は「結構である」と答えたので、本使より更に「反は権条項以外の問題を討論することにつき中国側の考えを聞きたい」旨を質した。

14.これに対し韓副部長は次のとおり述べた。

私が先回の発言の中で述べたように主要な問題は反は権条項にあり、その他の問題は意見の相違がないという訳ではないが、解決しにくいものではない。言い換えれば解決し易い問題であるということである。

双方の共通点は、「は権を求めるものがあればわれわれはそれがだれであれ反対する。」ということであると考える。これは実際に即しちゆう実に中日共同声明の精しんを表現している。これは日本側も同意した共通点である。従つて日本案の第3条第1文は条約のどこに現われても共同声明の原則と実質を損なうものであり、われわれは同意できない。もしそうすれば、共同声明の基礎から後退することになる。

15.これに対し本使より、「反は権条項以外の問題を討議したいとの点については同意が得られなかつたので、これ以上申し上げない」と述べたところ、韓副部長は、「反は権条項以外の問題は今後討議したい。いずれにしろ明日は日本側から本日の中国側の提案に対する回答をいただきたい。」との発言があつたので、最後に本使より「本日の休けい前の中国側の発言及び休けい後の中国側提案につき明日の会談において回答したい。」と述べ、双方とも明日3時に第8回目の会談を行うことに同意し本日の会談を終了した。

(了)

写手交済(1日02時40分)

ORIGINAL SCAN PDF

It appears your Web browser is not configured to display PDF files. No worries, just click here to download the PDF file.

Click here to view the PDF file in a new window.

PDFs cannot be printed inline in the page. To print a PDF, you must first download the file and open it in a PDF viewer.