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Digital Archive International History Declassified

February 12, 1994

CABLE NO. 1461, AMBASSADOR KURIYAMA TO THE FOREIGN MINISTER, 'JAPAN-UNITED STATES SUMMIT MEETING (WORKING LUNCH, SEPARATE TELEGRAM 4: RUSSIA)'

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    Clinton and Hosokawa discuss efforts to support economic and political reforms in Russia.
    "Cable No. 1461, Ambassador Kuriyama to the Foreign Minister, 'Japan-United States Summit Meeting (Working Lunch, Separate Telegram 4: Russia)'," February 12, 1994, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, Diplomatic Archives of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan, File No. 2014-00540. Translated by Stephen Mercado. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/240312
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Number: [TN: blacked out]

Primary: North American Affairs Bureau Director-General

Sent: United Nations, February 12, 1994, [TN: time blacked out]

Received: MOFA, February 13, 1994, [TN: time blacked out]

To: The Foreign Minister      

From: Ambassador Kuriyama

Japan-United States Summit Meeting (Working Lunch, Separate Telegram 4: Russia)

No. 1461 Secret Top Urgent

(Limited Distribution)

Outgoing Telegram No. 1457, Separate Telegram 4: Russia

(Clinton) I spoke this morning by telephone with President Yeltsin. The Bosnia issue was at the center of our conversation. You and I are both tackling reforms, but Yeltsin is facing a more serious problem.  Yeltsin is having a difficult time of it as a result of the new parliamentary elections the other day. I think that one reason for this is that Russia has no history of a free economy. It is necessary to support the transition of the countries of the former Soviet Union, starting with Russia, to democratic countries. I am grateful for Japan’s assistance. I think that it is right to promote the denuclearization of Russia and Ukraine and to increase economic assistance.

(Prime Minister) I agree, and the Government of Japan would like to do everything possible.

(Clinton) [TN: part of section blacked out] However, we should support Russia in privatization, the elimination of nuclear arms, and the construction of a safety net. We should not be led astray by the present situation but tackle the issues from a long-term perspective.

(Christopher) We also should not lose sight of the diplomatic aspect of reform. We think that there is hope that Russia’s diplomacy will be reformed in regard to the Baltic countries, Ukraine, the other countries of the former Soviet Union, and the Asian region, including the issue of the Northern Territories. This, too, is a reason to support the present Russian government.

(Bentsen) Russia is an important country, so we cannot do without engaging with international society. Developing Russia’s foundation in supporting privatization and fostering small and medium enterprises is important. On the other hand, it is also important to maintain the discipline of IMF conditionality and getting inflation under control.

(Foreign Minister) I agree. It will be a difficult situation if the reform of Russia does not make steady progress. Macroeconomic measures are important, but they are not enough by themselves. In the fostering of small and medium enterprises, Japan has know-how from its experience of postwar recovery, so we are carrying out meticulous aid, such as setting up within Russia a center to transmit that.

Passed to Russia (End)

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