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Bulgaria

Popular Documents

February 11, 1945

Yalta Conference Agreement, Declaration of a Liberated Europe

The text of the agreements reached at the Yalta (Crimea) Conference between President Roosevelt, Prime Minister Churchill and Generalissimo Stalin.

May 14, 1955

Warsaw Pact Treaty

Treaty establishing the Warsaw Pact in response to the integration of West Germany into NATO.

September 7, 1985

KGB, Information Nr. 2955 [to Bulgarian State Security]

The Soviet KGB seeks to create a "favorable opinion for us abroad" through active measures connected with the appearance of AIDS in the United States. The KGB also claims that the US Department of Defense is behind the "rapid spread of the AIDS disease"

September 3, 1986

Division X of the Hauptverwaltung Aufklärung (HVA/X) of the Ministry of State Security (MfS), 'Plan for Common and Coordinated Active MEasures of the Intelligence Organs of the MOI of the PR Bulgaria and the MfS of the GDR for 1987 and 1988'

HVA/X of the East German Ministry of State Security seeks cooperation with the Bulgarian Internal Affairs and State Security ministries to "prove that AIDS originated in the USA."

November 4, 1956

Stenographic record of a 4 November 1956 meeting of Party activists

Khrushchev describes the events of the counterrevolution in Hungary and the crisis in Poland. He recounts the CPSU's consultations with other communist parties in the socialist camp to determine their attitude toward Soviet intervention, particularly in Hungary. Leaders from China, Czechoslovakia, Romania, and Yugoslavia agreed with the Soviet position, but Polish leaders opposed the presence of Soviet troops in Hungary. Khrushchev reports that following these meetings, the CPSU CC Presidium decided to prepare for an attack on the counterrevolutionary forces in Hungary. He then reads aloud an open letter which declares the Hungarian Revolutionary Workers and Peasants Government. He gives details about the suppression of the counterrevolution by Soviet armed forces and the positive reaction of the socialist countries. He states that the lessons of the counterrevolution are to improve relations with the fraternal parties and the socialist countries and to treat them with respect; to improve political work among students and the masses so that they are not mislead by counterrevolutionaries; and to strengthen the Soviet Army.