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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • April 29, 1954

    Agreement between the Republic of India and the People's Republic of China on Trade and Intercourse between the Tibet Region of China and India

    China and India put forth the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence, which call for mutual respect for each other's territorial integrity and sovereignty, mutual non-aggression, mutual non-interference in each other's internal affairs, equality and mutual benefit, and peaceful co-existence.

  • May 03, 1954

    Memorandum of Conversation between Deputy Foreign Minister Zhang Hanfu and Indian Ambassador to China Raghavan Concerning Premier Nehru’s Statement on the Hydrogen Bomb

    Zhang Hanfu and Raghavan discuss the hydrogen bomb and the Colombo Conference.

  • October 21, 1954

    Minutes of Chairman Mao Zedong’s Conversation with Nehru at the Banquet Hosted by the Indian Ambassador

    Mao Zedong and Nehru talked about mutual cooperation and the Tibetan issue. Mao stated that cooperation has to be mutually beneficial. He then promised a small number of troops to guard Tibet, and Ambassador Raghavan replied that India trusts China on the Tibet issue.

  • October 22, 1954

    Abstract of Talk between Nehru, Chen Yun, and Vice Premier Li Fuchun

    Record of conversation between Indian and Chinese delegations, on a wide variety of issues in China. Conversation covers the structure of Chinese government, management of the bureaucracy, handling of finances, and plans for improving education and productivity levels.

  • August 25, 1955

    Record of Conversation from Premier Zhou's Reception of Ambassador Raghavan

    Zhou Enlai talked to Raghavan about two issues in the Sino-American talks: The release of American expatriates in China and the issue of Chinese expatriates in the US. Regarding the former, Zhou reaffirmed Chinese willingness to cooperate. According to him, there was no restriction and all American expatriates who apply would be able to return to the US. In the cases of Americans who violated Chinese law, however, it was necessary to proceed case by case and it was impossible to release them all at the same time as Washington demanded. On the second issue, the US admitted that they had placed limitations on the return of Chinese expatriates in the past. These restrictions had been lifted then but due to the number of Chinese expatriates and the pressure from Taipei, the problem could not be solved at once. Both countries agreed to let India act as a proxy for China and the UK act as a proxy for the US in this issue. Zhou and Raghavan went on to discuss some wording problems as well as the attitudes of both parties and the UK.