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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 28, 1956

    Andropov Report, 28 October 1956

    Yuri Andropov forwards this letter from Hungarian Prime Minister Andras Hegedus to the Council of Ministers of the Soviet Socialist Republics. The letter requests Soviet troops to quell the riots in Budapest.

  • October 28, 1956

    Andropov Telegram

    Andropov Telegram forwarding a letter from Prime Minister Hegedus of Hungary asking for assistance from Soviet troops in putting down Budapest riots

  • October 30, 1956

    Report from Politburo members Mikoyan and Suslov on the crisis in Hungary

    Mikoyan-Suslov Report on the deterioration of the political situation in Hungary. the report states that popular forces are taking over the radio station and the post office and that the Imre Nagy government does not want to use force against the uprising. Fearful of a strong reaction from the UN Security Council, Mikoyan and Suslov suggest that the Soviet leadership stop the inlux of Red Army units in Hungary for the time being.

  • November 01, 1956

    Andropov Report, 1 November 1956

    Andropov reports that Imre Nagy has threatened a scandal and the resignation of the government if the Soviet Union continues to send troops into Hungary. In his meeting with Nagy, Andropov is told that Hungary is withdrawing from the Warsaw Pact and will further request a UN guarantee of Hungarian neutrality if Soviet troop movements into Hungary do not stop. The report notes that after the meeting the Hungarian government informed the Embassy of its decision to leave the Warsaw Pact.

  • February 05, 1958

    Iu. Andropov to the Central Committee of the CPSU, 'On the Struggle with Local Nationalism in China'

    Iu. Andropov of the Liaison Department of the Central Committee of the CPSU describes Chinese Communist Party meetings in Xinjiang and "local nationalism" in China's far northwest.

  • February 16, 1958

    Journal of Soviet Ambassador to the DPRK A.M. Puzanov for 16 February 1958

    Ri Dong-yong informs Puzanov of the Plenum of the Pyongyang City Party Committee and the report from the DPRK Ambassador in Moscow.

  • January 23, 1959

    Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Report on the Delegates to the 21st Party Congress

    There is a mention of the several different secretaries of different communist countries—Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Korea. The need to improve economic situations and living standards in all countries is addressed, including the rebuilding of areas destroyed in the Korean war.

  • March 31, 1959

    Report by Yuri Andropov, 'On the Situation in Tibet'

    Report on Tibet, detailing the history of PRC-Tibetan relations since 1949 and the social and economic work of the PRC in Tibet. Discusses the activity of the Dalai and Panchen Lamas, and the political unrest in the region. Notes the relations of China, Tibet, and India.

  • February 13, 1963

    Secret Telegram from Jaszczuk (Moscow) to Rapacki (Warsaw) [Ciphergram No. 2019]

    Memorandum of a conversation with Yuri Andropov. He and Boleslaw Jaszczuk discuss Chinese influence military and economic influence in Vietnam, as well as Vietnam's opinion on the Cuban Missile Crisis. Finally he notes the poor communications technology in place in Southeast Asia.

  • April 03, 1963

    Memorandum of Conversation between Yuri Andropov and the Central Committee of the Romanian Worker’s Party

    Soviet politburo member Yuri Andropov and Gheorghe Gheorghiu-Dej discuss issues concerning the cooperation between the CPSU and the Romanian Worker's party and the two governments. The discussion ranges between economic integration issues, to the Sino-Soviet split, Soviet-Albanian relations, and politico-military cooperation between Warsaw Pact states.

  • April 13, 1964

    Note of Polish-Soviet Talks in Moscow on 13-15 April 1964

    Exceprts from a Polish-Soviet talk in Moscow in April 1964 that are about the Cuban issue. Specifically, they are about each country's sugar trade values with Cuba.

  • July, 1964

    Transcript of Conversations Between Delegations of the Romanian Workers Party Central Committee and the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Central Committee in Moscow (Excerpts)

    Transcript of meetings in Moscow between Romanian and Soviet officials. They discuss disagreements and divergences that have developed between the two parties.

  • October 05, 1966

    Transcript of Discussions with Representatives of the Chinese People’s Republic and The Communist Party of the Soviet Union on the Return of the Romanian Delegation from Vietnam (Moscow)

    This document is a transcript of a conversation between A. N. Kosygin and I. Gh. Maurer regarding the visit of the Romanian delegation to Vietnam and then China that discusses the suggestion that the Democratic Republic of Vietnam begin negotiations simultaneously while fighting, which both the Chinese and Vietnamese rejected, and the proposal that the socialist countries of the world communicate their policies toward Vietnam with each other, which the Vietnamese favored, but the Chinese rejected.

  • July 29, 1967

    Letter from the Chairman of the KGB Andropov to the Minister of Internal Affairs of the CSSR Kudrna

    Appointment of Soviet officials for discussion of the procedure for joint border monitoring of trains and passengers crossing the Soviet-Czechoslovak border.

  • November 10, 1967

    Memorandum, Chairman of the State Security Committee Andropov, Four American Servicemen Deserters from US Intrepid

    Four American servicemen who deserted in Japan from the US Intrepid as protest against US involvement in the Vietnam War. Andropov recommends that the Soviet Union help the four men come to Europe as part of a propaganda campaign.

  • May 06, 1968

    The KGB’s 1967 Annual Report

    Yearly report by KGB Chief Andropov to the CPSU leadership on the actions taken by the KGB in the field of espionage, counter-espionage, and counter-propaganda.

  • May 18, 1968

    Notes by Gen. M. Spasov on a Statement by Y. Andropov during a Bulgarian State Security Visit to Moscow

  • September 05, 1968

    Yurii Andropov, Nikolai Shchelokov, and Mikhail Malyarov to the CPSU CC

    This memorandum, signed by Yurii Andropov, the chairman of the Soviet Committee of State Security (KGB); Nikolai Shchelokov, the Minister of Public Order (whose ministry was renamed the Ministry of Internal Affairs in late November 1968); and Mikhail Molyarov, the Procurator of the USSR, was sent to the ruling Politburo of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU) eleven days after the demonstration in Red Square against the Soviet-led invasion of Czechoslovakia. The document lays out the basic facts of the case as viewed by the KGB and the CPSU. The document mentions the names of the eight activists who were in Red Square as well as two who helped with planning but were not actually in Red Square, Inna Korkhova and Maiya Rusakovskaya. Natal’ya Gorbanevskaya, one of the eight, was detained but released because she had recently given birth. However, a year later she was arrested in connection with her involvement and sentenced to a harsh term in a psychiatric prison.

  • September 20, 1968

    Yu. Andropov to the CPSU CC

    This memorandum from KGB Chairman Andropov to the CPSU Politburo follows up on the initial report from Andropov, Shchelokov, and Malyarov. The document highlights the “malevolent views” of the group that held an unauthorized demonstration in Red Square on 25 August 1968, singling out Pavel Litvinov, Larisa Bogoraz, Viktor Fainberg, and Vadim Delaunay for particular opprobrium. Andropov stresses that the KGB will intensify its crackdown on opposition figures who try to “spread defamatory information about Soviet reality.”

  • November 05, 1968

    Report Relayed by Andropov to the CPSU Central Committee, 'Students and the Events in Czechoslovakia'

    KGB Chairman Yuri Andropov presents a secret, 33-page report to the CPSU Central Committee about the mood of Soviet college students. The report had been completed sometime before the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, and had been circulating within the KGB. It is not clear precisely who drafted the report, but Andropov’s cover memorandum and the report itself indicate that the author was a college student in Odessa who had recently finished his degree.