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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • July 01, 1966

    Moldavian Communist Party Central Committee, No. 101 s, to CPSU Central Committee

    Moldavian leader Bodiul calls upon the central authorities in Moscow to respond to Romanian propaganda which stated that there was no separate Moldavian ethnic or political identity. He advocates the generation of publications to “objectively expose” Romanian and bourgeois interpretations “from a class position and in the interests of the socialist community of nations;” and requests assistance in preparing "in the Moldavian language, Russian and in a series of foreign languages a series of historical studies (monographs, brochures, atlases, etc.) and articles in central periodicals, on the radio and television broadcasts that bring to the attention of wider public opinion—Soviet and foreign—the truth about the Moldavian people, about its authentic history and about the true reality of its contemporary life."

  • June 03, 1968

    Transcript No. 53 of the Meeting of the Central Committee Bureau of the Moldavian Communist Party

    The Moldavian Communist Party discusses a decision by the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Central Committee approving measures for "improving ideological work in the republic," i.e. combating Romanian propaganda which undermined the separate ethnic and political identity of MoldThe MCP instructed a variety of institutions to cooperate in strictly regulating and reducing the entry of Romanian publications, broadcasts, information, and tourism into the republic; to create a propaganda base within the republic that would include increase numbers of publications and broadcasts, and new radio and television broadcast facilities; and to launch a new ideological offensive to combat Romanian influence.

  • July 03, 1972

    Moldavian Communist Party Central Committee, no. 210 s, to CPSU Central Committee, 'Proposal Regarding the Organization of KGB Organs in the Frontier Counties of the Republic'

    Request from the Moldavian Communist Party to send KGB officers to Moldavia in light of the “intensification of subversive activities directed against the republic by the special services and ideological centers of the Western countries,” of Israel, and of Romania. Travelers coming from Romania were deemed particularly dangerous because of their efforts “to inculcate our citizens with a nationalist spirit.” A “considerable part of them” smuggled in “materials and literature that are dangerous from the political perspective” while others “propagated the separate course of the Romanian leadership, the idea of breaking off the former Bessarabia from the USSR and uniting it with Romania.”

  • January 12, 1976

    Transcript No. 100 of the Meeting of the Central Committee Bureau of the Moldavian Communist Party

    In response to a decision of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Central Committee, the Moldavian Communist Party made plans for producing new radio, television and print propaganda. Measures were also planned for preventing the smuggling of nationalistic Romanian propaganda into the Moldavian Republic.

  • April 05, 1976

    Communist Party of Moldovia Central Committee, No. 125 s, to CPSU Central Committee, 'On the Creation of a Sector on the History of the International Communist Movement within the Institute of Party History at the Moldavian Communist Party'

    As part of the campaign to combat nationalist Romanian propaganda, the Moldavian leader informs the CPSU CC about the creation of a new section in the Moldavian Institute of Party History. This new section would include "a group of specialists... familiarized with the works of Romanian authors, [and] knowing the languages of the countries whose parties made up the Balkan Communist Federation."

  • May 26, 1976

    Moldavian Communist Party Central Committee, No. 145 ss, to CPSU Central Committee, 'Information on New Falsifications of Russo-Romanian and Soviet-Romanian Relations in the Publications of the Socialist Republic of Romania'

    Report on the "Falsifications" common in nationalist Romanian propaganda. The Moldavian Communist Party was concerned that this material denied the separate political and ethnic identity of Moldavians, insisting that they were Romanian, and was often strongly anti-Soviet. Romania had become the launching point from which, “through different channels, reactionary literature published in the US, FRG, Israel, China, and other countries in which the most extravagant anti-Sovietism prospers penetrates into the Soviet Union.”

  • July 20, 1978

    Moldavian Communist Party Central Committee, No. 179 ss, to CPSU Central Committee, 'Information Regarding the Intensification in Romania of a Propaganda Campaign that Harms the Interests of the USSR'

    The Moldavian Communist Party reports on the increasingly anti-Soviet nature of nationalist propaganda in Russia. Moldavian authorities were concerned by how this propaganda denied the existence of a separate Moldavian ethnic identity, while Soviet authorities were especially concerned by Bucharest’s role in attempting to consolidate an anti-Soviet Eurocommunism.

  • December 06, 1978

    Moldavian Communist Party Central Committee, No. 294s, to President of the USSR Committee for State Security (KGB), Andropov, 'Regarding the Necessity of Increasing the Number of Personnel of the Moldavian SSR KGB'

    The Moldavian Communist Party requests an increase in the number of KGB personnel in Moldavia to assist with efforts to "curb subversive activity" originating in Romania. This “ideological subversion” was further propagated by the Romanian print and broadcast media, through direct mailings (mail correspondence having “surpassed 500 thousand letters per year”) and through Romanian citizens visiting the republic who sought to indoctrinate the Soviet people “in an anti-Soviet, anti-Russian spirit."