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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 09, 1944

    Record of Meeting at the Kremlin, Moscow, 9 October 1944, at 10 p.m.

    Churchill, Eden, Stalin, and Molotov discuss the leadership in Poland, Britains interests in Greece and Hong Kong, the actions of Romania and Bulgaria during the war, Turkey, the need for the Great Powers to exert influence on the Balkans to prevent small wars, the leadership of Italy, interests in Bulgaria and Romania, the dividing of Germany and Germany's future, and the American plans in the war against Japan.

  • October 10, 1944

    Record of Meeting at the Kremlin, Moscow on 10 October 1944, at 7 p.m.

    Eden and Molotov discuss the post-war situation in the Balkans, the installment of a Control Commission to influence Bulgaria, Hungary, Romania, Yugoslavia and Germany as well as the dividing of these countries and which Great Power should exert control on each country.

  • October 17, 1944

    Record of Meeting Held at the Kremlin on 17 October 1944, at 10 p.m.

    Churchill and Stalin discuss the progress of the war in Europe and its brutality. They propose three alternative plans of German dismemberment and how German assets should be divided among the Allies. They discuss further punishments and reparations.

  • May 01, 1954

    Cable from Zhou Enlai, 'Regarding a Meeting with British Foreign Secretary Eden'

    Zhou Enlai, Molotov, and Eden discuss the Korea issue, the Indochina issue, Sino-British relations, British-American relations, and the issue of five powers.

  • May 14, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding the Situation at the Tenth Plenary Session

    Zhou Enlai reports on Eden's proposals at the tenth session on Korea. Eden focuses on elections based on the population distributions in North and South Korea, international supervision, and foreign troop withdrawal.

  • May 14, 1954

    Minutes of Conversation between Zhou Enlai and Anthony Eden

    Zhou Enlai and Anthony Eden discuss Geneva Conference proceedings related to the Korea and Indochina issues. Zhou expresses concerns for the French proposal on Indochina and states that China supports the North Vietnamese proposal. Zhou and Eden agree that a military armistice should be decided on, although they disagree on specific issues surrounding an armistice.

  • May 15, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Others, Requesting Instructions on the Korean Issue and Regarding the Situation at the Fourth Plenary Session on the Indochina Issue

    Zhou Enlai reports to the CCP on his meeting with Anthony Eden, the fourth plenary session on Indochina, and his meeting with the Soviet and Korean representatives. During the fourth session, representatives from Russia and France spoke on their positions on the armistice in Indochina.

  • June 01, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding the Situation at the Ninth Restricted Session

    Zhou reports on his conversation with Molotov and on the ninth restricted session on Indochina. Molotov describes his earlier meeting with Eden. Later, at the ninth session, Zhou insists to his opponents that the NNSC on Korea should serve as a model for NNSC on Indochina.

  • June 02, 1954

    Zhou Enlai’s Report to the Central Committee about His Contacts with Robert Eden and Georges Bidault

    Zhou reports on issues raised at Eden's banquet. Zhou tells Eden that the commission of neutral nations overseeing the Korean elections should be made up of both European and Asian countries.

  • June 04, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding the Situation at the Eleventh Restricted Session

    Zhou reports on the eleventh restricted session on Indochina. During the session, Zhou opposes using the UN as a supervisory body, and asserts that the joint commission should take major responsibility in implementing the armistice, and that the NNSC's function is to supervise the joint commission's work and the Indochina borders.

  • June 05, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding the Situation at the Twelfth Restricted Session

    Zhou reports on the twelfth restricted session on Indochina. Participants consider Zhou's proposal that the NNSC should be responsible to the Geneva Conference participants. Molotov gives his counterarguments to Smith's and Bidault's statements.

  • June 11, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding the Seventh Plenary Session

    Zhou reports to the CCP on the opening session of the Geneva Conference on Indochina. During this session, Pham Van Dong presents his five-point proposal, and Molotov rebuts arguments made by the US.

  • June 22, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding Talks with Eden

    Zhou reports on a meeting with Eden. In this meeting the two discuss the proposals on Laos and Cambodia. They also agree that the foreign ministers return to the conference regularly to see that their military representatives are productive.

  • July 13, 1954

    Minutes of Conversation between Zhou Enlai and Anthony Eden

    Zhou describes his meeting with Mendes-France and his trip to visit India to Eden. Zhou mentions the Sino-Indian and Sino-Burmese statements, and asks Eden to consider them a binding statement that China has no designs on Indochina, contrary to American suspicions. The two also discuss the upcoming meeting of Mendes-France with Pham Van Dong, and the possibility for progress during this meeting.

  • July 16, 1954

    From the Journal of Molotov: Secret Memorandum of Conversation with Zhou Enlai and Pham Van Dong

    Soviet Foreign Minister Vyacheslav M. Molotov describes his earlier conversations with British Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden and French Prime Minister Pierre Mendes-France to Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai and Vietnamese Vice-Premier Pham Van Dong. Eden told Molotov in their conversation that he preferred military issues to be primarily in the cease-fire agreement between Vietnam and France, rather than in France’s draft of its Geneva Conference declaration. Molotov’s discussion with Mendes-France dealt with elections in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia, the line of demarcation between North and South Vietnam, and the withdrawal of foreign troops from Vietnam.

  • July 17, 1954

    Minutes of Conversation between Zhou Enlai and Anthony Eden

    Eden assures Zhou that the US has no intention of establishing military bases in Indochina, and that although it has not been suggested that Cambodia and Laos join the Southeast Asian Pact, such an agreement would not threaten China. Zhou expresses concern over the pact, and suggests another model for peace in Indochina. The two debate over these issues.

  • July 19, 1954

    Minutes of Conversation between Zhou Enlai, Pierre Mendes-France, and Eden

    Zhou, Mendes-France, and Eden discuss regrouping areas and French troops in Laos. The three are close in their opinions, but there are still points of division. Mendes-France agrees to limit the number of French troops, but insists a specified time limit is unreasonable. Mendes-France also insists that some regrouping areas are needed in the south. This last point, the three agree to leave to military experts.

  • July 19, 1954

    From the Journal of Molotov: Secret Memorandum of Conversation with Eden at his Villa in Geneva, 10:00 p.m.

    Soviet Foreign Minister Vyacheslav M. Molotov and British Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden discuss the progress of the Geneva Conference thus far. They discuss the withdrawal of troops from Laos and Cambodia, the situations in Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam, and how best to solve these situations. They also discuss the relations between France and Vietnam.

  • March 21, 1955

    Letter from Humphrey Trevelyan to Zhou Enlai

  • May 10, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Comments on the Asian-African Conference from Capitalist Ruled Countries After the Asian-African Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry summarizes (predominantly) Western leaders' statements about the Bandung Conference. Secretary Dulles expressed great satisfaction with the "useful and good conference," especially its role in "checking China," while Great Britain expressed strong disapproval of China's behavior at the conference and France was "shocked" that Algeria was discussed. Israel and Australia expressed regret that they were excluded from the conference.