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  • March 30, 1968

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Report from Hungarian Ambassador in Delhi Péter Kós to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry on India's increasingly flexible position on the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

  • May 23, 1974

    Telegram No. 113, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Five days after India's first nuclear test, the Hungarian Embassy in New Delhi reports that Indian foreign policy experts speculate that the test could lead to closer Indian-Soviet relations.

  • May 23, 1974

    Telegram No. 118, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Five days after India's 1974 nuclear test, the Hungarian Embassy in New Delhi reports that the Indian government was grateful that the socialist countries had not confronted India on its nuclear explosion.

  • May 31, 1974

    Telegram No. 120, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Discussion of the importance of internal stability and the concept of independence in guiding India's foreign policy following India's first nuclear test.

  • July 06, 1976

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    A lengthy report on the results of India Gandhi's visit to the Soviet Union drawn from news sources and conversations with Indian officials. The response is described as highly positive with an expectation of closer political and economic cooperation between the two countries in the future.

  • May 17, 1978

    Telegram No. 115, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Discussion with the chair of the Atomic Energy Commission of India, Homi Sethna. The United States is no longer supplying India with nuclear fuel or supporting its nuclear energy program, creating an opportunity for cooperation between Hungary and India.

  • March 21, 1979

    Telegram No. 66, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry on Soviet Premier Kosygin's visit to India

    A summary of the results of Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin's visit to India. Discussions touched upon Soviet-Indian economic relations and a request by the Indians for Soviet arms.

  • June 14, 1979

    Telegram No. 149, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Description of a meeting between the Mongolian Ambassador and the Foreign Ministry of India. The Ministry was concerned about a trip by the Dalai Lama to Mongolia and the Soviet Union.

  • February 16, 1980

    Ciphered Telegram No. 43, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    A report from the Hungarian Embassy in India explaining that in the view of the Indian government, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan threatens regional stability as it could invite American and/or Chinese intervention.

  • April 30, 1980

    Ciphered Telegram No. 68, Embassy of Hungary in Pakistan to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Short analysis of Pakistani President Zia-ul-Haq's upcoming visits to China and North Korea, with discussion of the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and Pakistan's nuclear program.

  • January 19, 1982

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry on Indian-Pakistani relations

    Report based on information from a Soviet ambassador on India's strategy for dealing with Pakistan. India is concerned about the military support Pakistan is receiving from the United States and China, as well as Pakistan's nuclear weapons program. India is receiving military support from the Soviet Union, modernizing its forces, and seems to be preparing for war with Pakistan.

  • October 01, 1982

    Ciphered Telegram No. 192, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Short evaluation of Indira Gandhi's visit to the Soviet Union in 1982 and its objectives.

  • March 27, 1984

    Ciphered Telegram No. 87, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Report from an informant in the Parliament of India on the Congress Party's frustrations with Soviet Union and the Soviet's unwillingness to share military technology.

  • March 28, 1984

    Ciphered Telegram No. 88, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Report on frictions between the Soviet Union and Indian political leaders.

  • August 13, 1985

    Ciphered Telegram No. 214, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Information on the current status of both Pakistan and India's nuclear programs. The opinion of Indian Vice President Venkataraman is that Pakistan is lying about having already completed an atomic bomb.

  • August 13, 1985

    Ciphered Telegram No. 213, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Report on the status of the Indian nuclear program from Soviet sources. India may be preparing for an atomic bomb test.

  • October 23, 1985

    Ciphered Telegram No. 306, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Short report on arguments being made in India to gain support from the Soviet Union for the Indian nuclear program. India would like to gain international prestige similar to China.

  • April 25, 1986

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Lengthy analysis of relations between the Soviet Union and India, covering diplomatic, military, economic, and cultural relations. Includes discussion of high-level meetings with politicians like Rajiv Gandhi and Ramaswamy Venkataraman; military supplies provided by the Soviet Union to India; and trade agreements between the two countries. Also discusses tensions caused by India's opposition to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

  • November 12, 1986

    Ciphered Telegram No. 342, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Information from a Soviet diplomat who states that the Soviet Union expects India to become a nuclear power soon and anticipates negative consequences for nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament.

  • March 24, 1987

    Ciphered Telegram No. 126, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Information from a Soviet source about the potential positive results for Soviet foreign policy should India become a nuclear power.