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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • July 03, 1951

    Telegram from Mao Zedong to Stalin

    Mao Zedong writes Stalin on the Chinese position for a ceasefire in the Korean War which the Chinese side will propose at an upcoming meeting with the UN negotiators. Mao asks Stalin for his opinion on the Chinese position.

  • July 11, 1951

    Cable, Mao Zedong to Joseph Stalin

    Mao sends Stalin a brief report from Li Kenong concerning the agenda for the armistice negotiations.

  • July 11, 1951

    Cable, Mao Zedong to Joseph Stalin

    Mao sends Stalin four telegrams about the armistice negotiations which he received from Li Kenong.

  • July 12, 1951

    Cable, Mao Zedong to Joseph Stalin

    Mao sends Stalin a brief report concerning the 38th parallel and troop withdrawal during the armistice negotiations from Le Kenong.

  • July 16, 1951

    Ciphered Telegram from Mao Zedong to Filippov [Stalin], Transmitting Li Kenong's Telegram in Mao's Name

    Li Kenong's telegram discusses the neutral zone, troop retreats, and other terms of the armistice.

  • August 13, 1951

    Telegram from Mao Zedong to Stalin conveying 12 August 1951 telegram from Li Kenong to Mao re: Armistice Talks.

    Telegram from Mao to Stalin relaying the assessment of Li Kenong of the state of the ongoing armistice talks. He states that the US is unwilling the accept the 38th parallel as the demaracation line and that given the state of North Korean forces, they should consider make concessions to American demands in this regard in the interests of ceasing hostilities.

  • June 09, 1954

    Telegram, Li Kenong to the PRC Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Regarding the Chinese Delegation’s Meeting with the Delegations of Various Popular French Organizations

    Li Kenong reports to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Chinese delegation liaison team with the French delegations. Li describes the attitudes of most of the delegates as pro-Chinese and anti-American. The North African delegation, whom Li also meets, is described as anti-French government. Additionally, Li reports on propaganda materials (e.g. literature, buttons, etc) distributed during these meetings.

  • June 24, 1954

    Telegram, Li Kenong to the PLA General Staff and PRC Foreign Ministry, Regarding the Trip by Hoang Van Hoan and his Six-Person Group

    Li Kenong requests a special plane for Hoang Van Hoan folks' arrival in Beijing.

  • June 24, 1954

    Telegram, Li Kenong to the PRC Foreign Ministry

    Instructions are given for the three bags of top secret documents accompanying Comrade Ke Bainian to China.

  • June 26, 1954

    Cable from Li Kenong, 'Concerning the Content of a Meeting between the Soviet, Chinese, and Vietnamese Delegations'

    The Chinese, Vietnamese, and Soviet delegations meet to discuss the division of zones in Indochina.

  • June 29, 1954

    Telegram, Li Kenong to Mao Zedong, Liu Shaoqi, and the Central Committee, 'Briefing on the Meeting by the Chinese, Soviet and Vietnamese Delegations'

    Li Kenong reports on his usual meeting between the Chinese, Soviet, and Vietnamese delegations. Kuznetsov says the French think the Vietnamese are too demanding. Also, the Vietnamese request more discussion on economic issues and less of zone division.

  • July 03, 1954

    Telegram, Li Kenong to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding the Situation at the Twentieth Restricted Session

    In his report, Li notes that the opinions of the different delegations regarding the joint commission and the NNSC are becoming closer to one another. Britain and Bao Dai, however, remain unchanged in their opinions.

  • July 07, 1954

    Telegram, Li Kenong to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding the Situation at the Twenty-First Restricted Session

    Li reports on the 21st restricted session on Indochina. Li states China's position, which has been consistent, on the NNSC and joint commission. Li notes that the French now lean toward his side regarding Indochina. Li is asked to clarify a point by the French and Cambodian delegates, and the Laotian delegate makes a statement.

  • July 10, 1954

    Telegram, Li Kenong to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding the Situation at the Twenty-Second Restricted Session

    Li reports on the 22nd restricted session on Indochina. During the meeting, the American and Cambodian delegates state the necessity for defensive weapons in Cambodia and Laos. Li states that the issue of weapons should only be discussed based on certain principles: self-defense only, prohibition of foreign bases, and the countries’ relationship with France. After the Vietnamese and French delegates spoke, the Cambodian delegate made clear Cambodia’s intentions regarding weapons and defense.

  • 1955

    Information on Japan’s Participation in the Asian-African Conference

    A Chinese report on Japan's participation before the Asian-African Conference. The report observes that the Japanese public paid more attention to this conference than to the previous Bangkok conference and highlighted Tokyo's desire to cooperate with China.