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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • March, 1866

    Letter from George Kennan to Hattie Kennan, January 31- February 12, 1866

    During the Russian-American Telegraph Expedition to Siberia, American explorer George Kennan writes to his sister. Here, he contrasts the ethereal beauty of Siberian nature with the filthy interior of a subterranean dwelling of the settled Koryak, a Siberian Native tribe. Kennan strongly preferred what he called the “wandering Koraks,” who he saw as manly, strong, and independent, unlike the settled Koraks, who he felt had received the vices of civilization but none of the virtues.

  • July, 1866

    Letter from George Kennan to Doctor Morrill, July 4-16, 1866

    During the Russian-American Telegraph Expedition to Siberia, American explorer George Kennan writes to Dr. Charles Morrill of Norwalk, Ohio, Kennan's hometown. The letter lacks the final part and signature, as do several others reproduced here.

  • July 09, 1866

    Letter from George Kennan to Hattie Kennan, July 9, 1866

    During the Russian-American Telegraph Expedition to Siberia, American explorer George Kennan writes to his sister in a light and playful letter. The letter lacks the final part and signature.

  • October, 1866

    Draft Letter from George Kennan to Col. Charles Bulkley, September-October 1866

    In this draft letter, George Kennan the elder writes to his superior in the Russian-American Telegraph Expedition, Col. Charles Bulkley, to complain that promised supply ships never arrived due to logistical mistakes.

  • August 21, 1867

    Letter from George Kennan to Emma Hitchcock, August 21, 1867

    American explorer George Kennan writes to his cousin Emma Hitchcock, describing the sudden arrival of ships in Siberia with the news that the Russian-American Telegraph Expedition is to cease operations. Although Western Union had ordered this in October 1866, word did not reach Kennan until July 1867, nearly a year later. This letter is lacking the final pages and signature.

  • February, 1876

    Letter from George Kennan to John Kennan, February 4-16, 1867

    This letter from George Kennan the elder to his father is missing a large section, but one small part can be read, in which Kennan unburdens himself to his father regarding the misfortunes of the Russian-American Telegraph Expedition, owing in part to the mistakes of the expedition head, Col. Charles Bulkley.

  • September 02, 1938

    A Conversation Between Cdes. Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov and the Governor Shicai Sheng which Occurred in the Kremlin on 2 September 1938

    Stalin, Molotov, Voroshilov, and Governor Sheng discuss Xinjiang's military, level of industrialization, and natural resources, as well as Governor Sheng's strong desire to join the Communist Party.

  • January 04, 1939

    Translation of a Letter from Governor Shicai Sheng to Cdes. Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov

    Governor Sheng Shicai expresses gratitude to Cdes. Stalin, Molotov, and Voroshilov for the opportunity to visit Moscow. After reporting critical remarks made by Fang Lin against the Soviet Union and the Communist Party, Sheng Shicai requests that the All-Union Communist Party dispatch a politically experienced person to Urumqi to discuss Party training and asks that the Comintern order the Chinese Communist Party in Xinjiang to liquidate the Party organization.

  • March 03, 1944

    Paraphrase of Outgoing Navy Cable – Moscow, March 3, 1944.

    Ambassador Harriman and Joseph Stalin discuss future military movements in the Far East and Soviet intelligence about Japanese military plans.

  • March 03, 1944

    Stalin and Harriman Discuss Air Power and the Japanese

    Ambassador Harriman and Joseph Stalin discuss Far East Air Power and intelligence about Japanese military movements.

  • March 16, 1944

    Dinner Given by Marshal J.V. Stalin in Honour of the Command of the Polish Army

    Joseph Stalin holds a dinner in honor of Polish troops with prominent members of the Polish and Soviet military as well as Soviet state officials.

  • May 19, 1944

    Djilas's First Conversation with Stalin

    Milovan Djilas recounts his first meeting and impressions of Stalin and discuss wartime matters.

  • May 19, 1944

    Djilas' First Meeting with Stalin

    Milovan Djilas relates his first meeting with Stalin and the discussion about the Yugoslav military and other general conversation.

  • June 05, 1944

    Djilas’s Second Conversation with Stalin

    Milovan Djilas meets with Stalin and other Soviet officials for dinner to discuss relations with the West, D-day, and communism.

  • June 05, 1944

    Djilas’s Conversations at Stalin’s Dacha

    Milovan Djilas meets Stalin at his Dacha to discuss current affairs.

  • June 10, 1944

    Memorandum of Conversation between Harriman, Stalin, and Molotov, 'Poland'

    Ambassador Harriman and Joseph Stalin discuss questions regarding the Polish government.

  • June 10, 1944

    Stalin and Harriman discuss Far East Air Power

    Ambassador Harriman and Stalin discuss using Far East air bases for American troops and American's training Soviet pilots.

  • June 10, 1944

    Conversation about The Far East

    Harriman and Stalin discuss the Soviets entering the Pacific Theater after Germany's defeat and the use of Far East bases.

  • June 26, 1944

    Paraphrase of Army Cable

    Harriman telling the President that he presented the Stalingrad and Leningrad scrolls to Stalin.

  • August 05, 1944

    Boleslow Bierut Arrives in Moscow

    The President of the National Council of Poland gives a speech in Moscow.