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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • September 04, 1954

    Chinese Foreign Ministry Intelligence Department Report on the Asian-African Conference

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry reported Indonesia’s intention to hold the Asian-African Conference, its attitude towards the Asian-African Conference, and the possible development of the Conference.

  • October 21, 1954

    Talking Points from Premier Zhou Enlai’s Third Meeting with Nehru

    Zhou Enlai and Nehru discuss Sino-Indian relations, as well as China and India's views toward Thailand, Indonesia, Korea, Vietnam, and Ceylon (Sri Lanka).

  • October 21, 1954

    Minutes of the Third Meeting between Premier Zhou Enlai and Nehru

    Zhou and Nehru discuss developments in South Asia and Southeast Asia.

  • December 06, 1954

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Indonesia, 'The Prime Ministers of India, Burma, Pakistan, Ceylon are Preparing to Attend the Bogor Conference'

    Ambassador to Indonesia Huang Zhen reports that the prime ministers of India, Burma, Ceylon and Pakistan are planning to attend the Bogor Conference. Ceylon's request that China, Japan, Israel and Turkey not be invited to the Asian-African Conference has been rejected.

  • December 15, 1954

    Report from the Asia Section, Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'On the Asian-African Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry reported that Indonesia’s intention to hold the Asian-African Conference was to establish a neutral, third group to counter the US and the Soviet Union. It also reported the attitudes of the invited countries and the reactions of the Western countries toward the Conference. It concluded that it would be beneficial for China to participate in the Conference and to influence the political situation in the Conference.

  • December 29, 1954

    Cable from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Intelligence Department, 'The Agenda of the Five Southeast Asian Countries from the Bogor Conference and the Five Countries’ Attitudes towards China’s Participation in the Afro-Asian Conference '

    The agenda of the Bogor Conference was to determine the purposes, timing, and participants of the Asian-African Conference. The five Southeast Asian countries agreed that China and Japan should participate in the Asian-African Conference, but some countries also insisted on the participation of US allies such as Thailand and the Philippines.

  • December 31, 1954

    Cable from Peng Di, 'Situation of the Bogor Conference'

    Report from the Bogor Conference. The main issue of the conference was whether or not to invite China to the Asian-African Conference. The five principles of peaceful coexistence were also discussed and approved, but not published.

  • 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'List of Problems Between China and Other Asian-African Countries'

    A list of problems between China and other Asian-African countries

  • 1955

    View of the Asian-African Conference from the Bogor Conference

  • January 02, 1955

    Cable from Huang Zhen, 'Situation Report of the Bogor Conference'

    Huang Zhen reports the circumstances of the receptions and dinners hosted by Indonesia and his personal conversations with the Ceylonese premier, the Indonesian premier and the Indonesian foreign minister during the Bogor Conference.

  • January 06, 1955

    Cable from Peng Di, 'Third Intelligence Report on the Insider Situation of the Bogor Conference'

    Report on the Bogor Conference, the nomination of countries to attend the Asian-African Conference and the issue of whether or not to invite China.

  • January 08, 1955

    Cable from Peng Di, 'Regarding the Situation of the Bogor Conference'

    Peng Di reports on discussions at the Bogor Conference, including the status of the five principles of peaceful coexistence and inter-asian economic cooperation.

  • January 10, 1955

    Cable from Feng Xuan, 'Reaction of Britain, United States, France towards the Kuala Lumpur Five Countries inviting China to attend the Afro-Asian Conference'

    The UK responded the decision of inviting China to attend the Asian-African Conference with anger, stating that countries in the Bogor Conference had wrong expectations toward China. The US feared that China would have great influence on the Asian-African Conference and thus weaken US influence in the region. The US and UK also worried that China’s participation would improve China-Japan relations. French press expressed this decision as the evidence of the failure of the US power in Southeast Asia.

  • March 08, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Trade, 'Plan for Our participation in theTtrade Activities of the Asian-African Conference (Draft)'

    The Department of International Trade estimated that the Asian-African Conference would be a good occasion to strengthen economic and trade relations with the participating countries. The Department of International Trade therefore made the recommendations to befriend with these former colonies for developing strong economic and political relations.

  • March 09, 1955

    Cable from Huang Zhen, 'Report regarding Asian-African Conference Issues'

    The telegram covers the rules of procedure on the Asian-African Conference and some logistic issues and receptions of the Conference.

  • March 12, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Trade, 'Scheme for Our Participation in the Trade Activities of the Asian-African Conference (Revised Draft) (Preliminary Paper)'

    The Department of International Trade estimated that the Asian-African Conference would be a good occasion to strengthen economic and trade relations with the participating countries. The Department of International Trade therefore made the recommendations to befriend with these former colonies for developing strong economic and political relations. This is the modified version of the draft plan that was issued earlier.

  • March 27, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Compilation of the Excerpts of the Telegrams Concerning the Asian-African Conference'

    The collection of telegrams covers the procedure and agenda about the Asian-African Conference, the arguments about China’s participation in the Conference, the attempts of the US and the UK to influence the Conference, and the attitudes of various countries toward the Conference.

  • April 04, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Draft Plan for Attending the Asian-African Conference'

    The participants in the Asian-African Conference had the common interest in pursuing international peace and national economic and cultural development. China should take the advantage of this Conference to promote national independence movement and to establish stronger relations with Asian and African countries. According to this goal, the plan listed the common issues that all participants faced, the issues that existed between China and other countries, and the issues that China alone was facing. It also spelled out the relations of China and different groups of counties in the Conference, as well as the logistic issues.

  • April 28, 1955

    Chinese Foreign Ministry Reference Document No.1

    Chinese Reference Document No. 1 which includes the following articles: Ike says to correspondents that the USA is willing to hold direct negotiations with New China Britain wishes to be a loyal mediator between New China and the USA Burmese newspapers’ comments on Taiwan issue Nehru, Nasir and others speak to correspondents in Calcutta Menzies’s comments on Zhou Enlai’s proposal Kotalawela’s comment on the Asian-African Conference USA and Red China Bright prospect Bright prospect The Five States of the Colombo Conference and the USA Comments of the prime ministers of India, Pakistan and Egypt on the Asian-African Conference The Bandung Conference The Five States of the Colombo Conference and the USA. Allen’s comments on the Asian-African Conference Pakistan and Egypt on the Asian-African Conference

  • May 10, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Comments on the Asian-African Conference from the Participating Countries After the Conference'

    Description of the reaction to the Asian-African Conference in both participating countries and capitalist ruled countries.