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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • September 20, 1947

    Report of Pham No Mach [Pham Ngoc Thach] to the Soviet Envoy in Switzerland, A. G. Kulazhenkov

    Report of a meeting with an emissary of the Viet Minh government who requested Soviet support for Vietnamese forces in their independence war against the French. Pham Ngoc Thach stresses the communist nature of the Republic of Vietnam's government, explaining that the Communist Party was only dissolved in 1945 "to avoid provoking a negative American reaction." Pham also discusses his meetings with the French Communist Party in Paris, and the situation in other Southeast Asian countries, including Malay, Indonesia and Thailand.

  • June 15, 1954

    Asian Peoples' Anti-Communist Conference, Minutes of the Opening Session

    Delegates from South Korea, China, Macao, the Philippines, and the Ryukyu Islands discuss the anti-communist struggle in the Asia Pacific.

  • June 15, 1954

    Asian Peoples' Anti-Communist Conference, Provisional Summary Record of the Opening Session

    Delegates from South Korea, China, Macao, the Philippines, and the Ryukyu Islands discuss the anti-communist struggle in the Asia Pacific.

  • June 16, 1954

    Asian Peoples' Anti-Communist Conference, Speech by Chief Thailand Delegate Mr. Phra Rajadharm Nides

    Thai National Assemblyman Phra R. Nides discusses communism in Southeast Asia and the outcomes of the Geneva Conference.

  • June 17, 1954

    Asian Peoples' Anti-Communist Conference, Provisional Summary Record of the Third Session

    Minutes of the Third Session of the Asian Peoples' Anti-Communist Conference.

  • June 29, 1954

    Letter, President Syngman Rhee to Phra R. Nides

    Sygnman Rhee thanks Thai National Assemblyman Phra R. Nides for attending the meeting of the Asian Peoples' Anti-Communist League in Chinhae, Korea.

  • October 21, 1954

    Talking Points from Premier Zhou Enlai’s Third Meeting with Nehru

    Zhou Enlai and Nehru discuss Sino-Indian relations, as well as China and India's views toward Thailand, Indonesia, Korea, Vietnam, and Ceylon (Sri Lanka).

  • October 21, 1954

    Minutes of the Third Meeting between Premier Zhou Enlai and Nehru

    Zhou and Nehru discuss developments in South Asia and Southeast Asia.

  • December 15, 1954

    Report from the Asia Section, Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'On the Asian-African Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry reported that Indonesia’s intention to hold the Asian-African Conference was to establish a neutral, third group to counter the US and the Soviet Union. It also reported the attitudes of the invited countries and the reactions of the Western countries toward the Conference. It concluded that it would be beneficial for China to participate in the Conference and to influence the political situation in the Conference.

  • December 25, 1954

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Regarding Our Attitude towards the Afro-Asian Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry informed Chinese embassies overseas that China supported the Asian-African Conference as well as the participation of the countries with whom China had no diplomatic relation, such as Japan, the Philippines, and Thailand. China also emphasized that Chiang Kai-shek was not to be invited to the Conference.

  • December 29, 1954

    Cable from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Intelligence Department, 'The Agenda of the Five Southeast Asian Countries from the Bogor Conference and the Five Countries’ Attitudes towards China’s Participation in the Afro-Asian Conference '

    The agenda of the Bogor Conference was to determine the purposes, timing, and participants of the Asian-African Conference. The five Southeast Asian countries agreed that China and Japan should participate in the Asian-African Conference, but some countries also insisted on the participation of US allies such as Thailand and the Philippines.

  • 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'List of Problems Between China and Other Asian-African Countries'

    A list of problems between China and other Asian-African countries

  • 1955

    View of the Asian-African Conference from the Bogor Conference

  • February 25, 1955

    Abstract of Conversation: Chinese Premier Zhou receives Trevelyan

    Zhou Enlai and Trevelyan debated on the nature of the Manila Treaty and its implications for the Geneva Agreement.They also discussed the issue of the Dai Autonomous Region between China and Thailand and the legal status of Taiwan.

  • March 08, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Trade, 'Plan for Our participation in theTtrade Activities of the Asian-African Conference (Draft)'

    The Department of International Trade estimated that the Asian-African Conference would be a good occasion to strengthen economic and trade relations with the participating countries. The Department of International Trade therefore made the recommendations to befriend with these former colonies for developing strong economic and political relations.

  • March 12, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Trade, 'Scheme for Our Participation in the Trade Activities of the Asian-African Conference (Revised Draft) (Preliminary Paper)'

    The Department of International Trade estimated that the Asian-African Conference would be a good occasion to strengthen economic and trade relations with the participating countries. The Department of International Trade therefore made the recommendations to befriend with these former colonies for developing strong economic and political relations. This is the modified version of the draft plan that was issued earlier.

  • March 27, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Compilation of the Excerpts of the Telegrams Concerning the Asian-African Conference'

    The collection of telegrams covers the procedure and agenda about the Asian-African Conference, the arguments about China’s participation in the Conference, the attempts of the US and the UK to influence the Conference, and the attitudes of various countries toward the Conference.

  • March 28, 1955

    Report on a Trip to Vietnam

    Choi Duk Shin and Young P. Lee summarize their travels through Hong Kong, Bangkok, and Vietnam, including their discussions on politics, military situations, cultural sharing, and strategies for Free Asia to join together against Communism.

  • April 01, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'The Asian-African Conference'

    The note covers the background, achievements, and influence of the Asian-African Conference. It states that the Conference was initiated because Asian and African countries gained their independence after the Second World War and wanted to tackle the imperialism and colonialism. After the Conference, there was an increase of anti-imperialism sentiment among the Asian and African countries.

  • April 11, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Attitudes of Various Countries towards the Asian-African Conference on the Eve of the Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry examines the attitude of several parties to the Asian-African Conference, including India, Egypt, Thailand, the Philippines, and Japan.