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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • 1945

    Soviet Report on Japanese Population in Korea and the Korean Population in Manchuria

    A Soviet report on the situation of Japanese in Korea and on the status of Koreans in Manchuria, or Northeast China, after liberation.

  • 1945

    Soviet Report on Communists in Korea, 1945

    Soviet officers provide a sketch of the existing communist movement in northern and southern Korea in 1945 and suggest that Kim Il Sung should be a leading candidate to head the Korean government.

  • December 10, 1945

    Malik, 'On the Question of a United Government in Korea'

    This document discusses the creation of an independent Korea. Roosevelt, Churchill, and Jiang Jieshi (Chiang Kai-shek) first presented the idea at the Cairo Conference in 1943. The United States supports the creation of a single Korean state while the USSR opposes it. The document discusses the importance of the answer to the unification question for the Soviet Union's political and economic future as well as its interest in the Far East.

  • January 11, 1946

    Untitled memorandum on the political and morale situation of Soviet troops in North Korea and the economic situation in Korea

    A Soviet report on the first several months of the occupation of North Korea.

  • April 02, 1946

    Protocol No. 18 of a Meeting of the Special Committee under the Council of Ministers of the USSR (Excerpt)

    Special dossier containing a resolution to send a Soviet geological prospecting party to survey North Korea for beryllium.

  • August 29, 1946

    Kim Il Sung, 'For the Establishment of a United Party of the Working Masses: Report to the Inaugural Congress of the Workers' Party of North Korea'

    Kim Il Sung's speech at the 1st Congress of the Korean Workers' Party.

  • November 22, 1946

    Report for General-Major Comrade Romanenko on the Political Situation in Korea

    In this telegram Shtykov reviews the activities of the Socialist-Workers' Party of South Korea, stating that it is comprised of reactionary elements and should not be allowed to join with the Workers' Party of South Korea. Lacking a broad base among the working masses, the Socialist-Workers Party would undermine the work done thus far in South Korea. Furthermore, Shtykov advises Ho Hong to be nominated leader of the Workers' Party of South Korea and and Pak Heon-yeong first chairman.

  • 1947

    Top Secret Documents on the China Situation

    North Korean intelligence on events in the Chinese Civil War.

  • January 01, 1947

    Letter to General-Lieutenant Hodge on Northern Korea Providing Electricity to Southern Korea

    Shtykov informs Ignatev of South Korea's current inability to pay its debt for electricity to North Korea.

  • January 03, 1947

    Central Intelligence Group, ORE 5/1, 'The Situation in Korea'

    An intelligence report about both North and South Korea. The report explains what the situation currently is and what is projected to happen with Soviet and American interaction with their respective Koreas.

  • April 25, 1947

    Protocol No. 36 of a Meeting of the Special Committee under the Council of Ministers of the Soviet Union (Excerpt)

    Special dossier refining aspects of the geological prospecting party to North Korea, to extract "rare elements".

  • May 12, 1947

    Cable No. 121973, Meretskov and Shytkov to Cde. Stalin

    A request to send Soviet specialists to North Korea. The DPRK especially needs engineers to help them build railways. Shtykov notes that if the Koreans don’t receive aid from the Soviets, they'll turn to the Americans.

  • July 05, 1947

    What Every Political Party and Social Organization Must Demand on the Establishment of a Democratic Interim Government of Korea

    A reprinting of Kim Il Sung's June 14, 1947, speech to the Democratic National United Front on the establishment of a democratic interim government. An appendix to the publication contains Kim Il Sung's June 23, 1947, speech, "To the Korean Youth Before the Establishment of the Democratic Interim Government."

  • September 04, 1947

    Letter, V.M. Molotov to George C. Marshall

    Molotov blames the Americans for the failure of the US-Soviet Joint Commission on Korea and rejects the latest proposals put forth by Robert A. Lovett.

  • October 12, 1947

    Incoming Cable No. 16, Malik to Cde. Stalin

    Stalin agrees to Malik's proposal regarding the situation in Korea, which calls for the creation of an All-Korean Temporary Assembly to resolve the peninsula's issues. The Soviet representative is to insist to the Americans that such a consultative body be established.

  • October 17, 1947

    Letter, Robert A. Lovett to V.M. Molotov

    Responding to Molotov's letter about Korea dated September 4, Lovett writes that the US will refer the Korean issue to the United Nations and forego further bilateral discussions with the USSR.

  • October 17, 1947

    George C. Marshall, 'A Program for a More Effective United Nations: Address by the Chief of the U.S. Delegation to the General Assembly'

    Marshall speaks about Greece, Palestine, and Korea, as well as the international control of atomic energy and the role and structure of the United Nations.

  • October 18, 1947

    Ciphered Telegram, Molotov to Cde. Stalin

    Molotov reports his answers to several questions from Vyshinsky: he advises not to be so contentious with Marshall on private questions. On the Korean issues, Vyshinsky should remind the Americans about the terms of the December agreements calling for a united, democratic Korea and that Marshall's new proposals at the UN constitute a violation of these agreements. He approves Vyshinsky's position on the veto and the peace and security committee.

  • September 18, 1947

    Text of Speech Delivered by A.Y. Vyshinsky at the General Assembly of the United Nations, September 18, 1947

    The Soviet Union's response to George Marshall's September 17, 1947, speech at the UNGA. Vyshinsky offers the Soviet Union's position on arms control, nuclear weapons, the UN, Korea, Greece, and other issues raised by Marshall

  • October 20, 1947

    Ciphered Telegram, Molotov to Cde. Stalin

    Molotov relates how the Americans have rejected the Soviet position toward establishing a temporary all Korean assembly. While there is some overlap between both positions, this issue has now been exacerbated by Marshall's move to decide it in the UNGA. The Soviets should respond to this move by reiterating their commitment to a self-determined form of government for Korea, which requires the Soviets and Americans to withdraw their troops.