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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • June 14, 1948

    Central Intelligence Agency Report, "Effects of Soviet Restrictions on the US Position in Berlin"

    Describes effect of Soviet restrictive measures in Berlin on US intelligence and propaganda activities and on operations of the joint military government.

  • February, 1949

    Cable, Joseph Stalin to Anastas Mikoyan

    Cable from Stalin to Mikoyan giving answers to questions raised by Mao Zedong. Stalin advises not to rush in creating a government in China before comprehensively "clearing the liberated area from hostile elements." Stalin explains that the USSR sent an agent to Canton for intelligence-gathering, and says that the Americans and English are sending ambassadors to CCP areas to function as spies.

  • February 03, 1949

    Cable, Joseph Stalin to Anastas Mikoyan

    Stalin cable to Mikoyan, asking Mikoyan to bring Mao's attention to the issue of Nanjing'ists taking China's state-owned gold south from evacuated cities and areas in China. Stalin recommends that Mao make the return of this gold a condition for holding talks with the Nanjing'ists.

  • February 03, 1949

    Cable, Filippov [Stalin] to Anastas Mikoyan

    Cable from Stalin to Mikoyan, sent with the intent to be passed on to Mao Zedong. Stalin expresses pleasure with the Chinese control of China's peasantry and students, but expresses disappointment that the CCP does not control the majority of the working class. Stalin advises that China turn its big cities into bases for communism, and then gives more specific advice for gaining a majority among the working class. Stalin then responds to Mao's request for weapons, explaining that the USSR doesn't have anti-tank and anti-aircraft weapons of foreign make, but can send Russian-made weapons.

  • February 04, 1949

    Cable, Anastas Mikoyan to Joseph Stalin

    Cable from Mikoyan to Stalin, saying that Mao and the members of the Chinese Politburo were pleased with the content of previous telegrams sent by Stalin.

  • February 04, 1949

    Cable, Joseph Stalin to Anastas Mikoyan

    Stalin cable to Mikoyan, responding to Mikoyan's report that an American named Rittenberg is stationed with the Chinese Communist party as a spy. Stalin recommends an arrest of Rittenberg immediately, so as "to expsoe the network of American agents" operating in China. Stalin then notes that another American, writer Anna-Louise Strong, is also an American spy.

  • February 04, 1949

    Cable, Joseph Stalin to Anastas Mikoyan

    Stalin cable to Mikoyan, asking Mikoyan to recount a four-point cable sent earlier to Mao Zedong. Stalin has not heard an answer, and demands an immediate one.

  • February 04, 1949

    Cable, Anastas Mikoyan to Joseph Stalin

    Cable sent from Mikoyan to Stalin, summarizing a discussion between Mikoyan and Mao. In that conversation, Mikoyan tells Mao that once the USSR opposed foreign mediation between the Guomindang and CCP, England, America and France changed their positions from supporting mediation to refuting mediation. Mikoyan then draws to Stalin's attention that Zhou Enlai noticed permanent representatives of Americans, including "spies, and journalists," among the Chinese Communist Party.

  • May 29, 1953

    CIA Report Evaluating Vladimir Semyonov’s Appointment as Soviet High Commissioner for Germany

    A CIA report presents an analysis of the dissolution of the Soviet Control Commission (SCC) and the return of V.S. Semyonov to Germany as the Soviet High Commissioner for Germany.

  • June 17, 1953

    Cable from Czechoslovak Mission in Berlin to Vaclav David, 1:45 PM

    The Czechoslovak Mission in Berlin described the proceeding of the demonstrations in East Berlin on 17 June 17.

  • June 17, 1953

    Cable from the Czechoslovak Mission in Berlin to Foreign Minister Vaclav David, 4:30 p.m.

    Flash Cable from the Czechoslovak Mission in Berlin to the Czechoslovak Foreign Minister reporting on the situation in East Germany following the popular uprising. The cable reports workers asking for the formation of a new government and free elections. The cable also reports sporadic clashes between the demonstrators and the East German security forces and Soviet forces.

  • June 18, 1953

    CIA Current Intelligence Review Analyzing the Communist 'New Look in East Germany' and 'Recent Unrest in Eastern Europe'

    A CIA report discusses new policy modification in East Germany following the East German Uprising. It is reported that measures are being taken by the regime to relieve political and economic tension and to improve the quality of life in East Germany. This includes shifting the some of the production of heavy machinery to the production of consumer goods. The report also reviews details on recent social unrest in Eastern Europe.

  • June 19, 1953

    CIA Current Intelligence Digest 'Comment on Berlin Rioting'

    According to the CIA report, as of the 19th of June, the situation in East Berlin has been repressed by Soviet troops and the East German police, and inter-sector traffic is strictly controlled. However, in other areas of East Germany, strikes and disturbances are still being reported.

  • June 19, 1953

    Minutes of Discussion at the 150th Meeting of the National Security Council, 18 June 1953

    The US National Security Council discusses recent release of prisoners of war in South Korea. The riots and disturbances in East Germany and Czechoslovakia are discussed in the context of the general “softening” of Soviet policy. The Council also discusses the possibility of a four-power meeting, and other alternative courses of action.

  • June 21, 1953

    CIA Current Intelligence Bulletin on Comments by Charles Bohlen and the Deployment of Soviet Troops

    Charles Bohlen, ambassador to the Soviet Union, speculates on liberalization reforms in East Germany and their potential impact on Soviet leadership and the reaction of other Satellite nations, following the East German uprising.

  • June 24, 1953

    CIA Information Report 'Continuing Resistance Among Workers'

    A CIA report states updates regarding East German workers, many of which had fled to West Berlin during the uprising on June 16-17, and their plan to continue resistance at their place of employment.

  • June 24, 1953

    CIA Intelligence Memorandum, 'Indications of [Soviet] Intentions in Europe'

    This CIA report states that the recent uprising revealed the Eastern German Communist regime’s dependence on Soviet military force to maintain power and enforce order. Based on activity of Soviet forces, indications of future Soviet intentions in Germany and in Europe are also discussed.

  • July 10, 1953

    CIA Information Report, 'Berlin as of 5.00 p.m., 9 July 1953'

    This CIA report contains an assessment of the situation in East Berlin; while East Sector is relatively quiet, general unrest still exists with strong indications of upcoming workers strikes.

  • July 10, 1953

    CIA Special Supplement to the Current Intelligence Weekly

    This CIA report contains a chronological breakdown of the nature and extent of the riots and demonstrations in East Germany, and descriptions of the Soviet reaction, East German capabilities, East German government reaction, and the Soviet policy reaction. According to the report, at this point, the USSR has not yet revealed any long-term policy reaction to the German situation.

  • July 13, 1953

    CIA Information Report, 'Plans for Strikes in East Germany'

    A series of intelligence information regarding strike plans throughout Eastern Germany.