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Digital Archive International History Declassified

SEARCH RESULTS FOR “"pak heon-yeong"”

  • 1945

    Soviet Report on Communists in Korea, 1945

    Soviet officers provide a sketch of the existing communist movement in northern and southern Korea in 1945 and suggest that Kim Il Sung should be a leading candidate to head the Korean government.

  • January 11, 1946

    Untitled memorandum on the political and morale situation of Soviet troops in North Korea and the economic situation in Korea

    A Soviet report on the first several months of the occupation of North Korea.

  • March 05, 1949

    Meeting between Stalin and Kim Il Sung

    Kim Il Sung and Stalin discuss the military and economy in North Korea, Soviet-North Korean relations, and North Korea's relations with other foreign countries.

  • April 20, 1949

    The Korean Issue at the Third General Assembly of the United Nations

    Published by the Society for the Study of International Problems in 1949, this book contains a compilation of letters and news from 1948 that cover North Korea's position toward the Korean issue at the United Nations.

  • September 14, 1949

    Telegram from Tunkin to the Soviet Foreign Ministry in Reply to 11 September Telegram

    North Korea plans to attack South Korea, but the Soviet Foreign Ministry is skeptical about North Korea's actual military capabilities and generally disproves of North Korea's plans.

  • September 24, 1949

    Politburo Decision to Confirm the Following Directive to the Soviet Ambassador in Korea

    The Soviet Politburo argues that North Korea is not ready to launch a successful overthrow of the South Korean regime and suggests North Korea should concentrate its efforts on developing partisan groups in South Korea.

  • October 06, 1949

    Premier Zhou Enlai's Note to North Korea on His Willingness to Establish Diplomatic Relations with China

    Zhou Enlai writes to North Korean Foreign Minister Pak Hon-yeong and conveys China's desire to establish diplomatic relations with North Korea.

  • January 19, 1950

    Telegram Shtykov to Vyshinsky on a Luncheon at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the DPRK

    Shtykov reports a meeting with Kim Il Sung, along with Chinese and Korean delegates. Kim Il Sung expresses his view on the prospect of a liberation of the South Korean people that is to follow the Chinese success in liberation. Kim expresses his view that the South Koreans support his cause for reunification which the South Korean government does not seem to purse, and that he desires to ask Stalin for permission on an offensive action on South Korea.

  • January 31, 1950

    Telegram from the USSR Ambassador to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to Stalin

    As a response to Stalin's willingness to talk to Kim Il Sung on the issue of offensive attack to South Korea and on Stalin's request of lead, Kim Il Sung, according to Shtykov, responded that he would like to set up a meeting with him, and that he would take necessary measures for the lead to be delivered to the Soviet Union.

  • February 07, 1950

    Telegram from Shtykov to Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Vyshinsky

    Shtykov relays to Vyshinsky Kim Il Sung's questions regarding the central committee's decision to issue a loan, on whether they can proceed toward forming more infantry, and on if North Korea could use in 1950 the credit the Soviet government had allocated for 1951. In answer to Kim Il Sung's requests, Shtykov answered ambiguously, stating that more thought needs to be put in.

  • March 21, 1950

    Oral Message from Choe Yeong, Charge d'Affaires, North Korean Embassy

    Choe Yeong informs the Chinese Foreign Ministry of the upcoming birthday of Pak Heon-yeong, Foreign Minister of the DPRK.

  • March 21, 1950

    Telegram from Shtykov to Vyshinski regarding meeting with Kim Il Sung

    Shtykov reports on his meeting with Kim Il Sung where Kim Il Sung requests a meeting with Stalin in Moscow.

  • March 24, 1950

    Telegram from Shtykov to Vyshinsky regarding Kim Il Sung's impending trip to Moscow

    Shtykov informs Vyshinsky of Kim Il Sung's upcoming visit and the transportation arrangements.

  • May, 1950

    Record of a Conversation of Cde. Stalin with Kim Il Sung and Pak Heon-yeong

    Kim Il Sung and Stalin discuss the North Korean economy and Soviet-North Korean cooperation.

  • April 25, 1950

    Telegram from Ignatiev to Vyshinsky

    Report of Kim Il Sung and Pak Heon-yeong’s safe arrival into North Korea.

  • May 12, 1950

    Telegram from Shtykov to Vyshinski regarding meeting with Kim Il Sung

    Shtykov reports of a meeting with Kim Il Sung, in which Kim Il Sung tells Shtykov the questions he means to ask Mao Zedong in a following meeting in Beijing the next day.

  • May 13, 1950

    Cable from Roshchin to Stalin, Relaying Mao's Request for Clarification on North Korea Taking Action Against South Korea

    The telegram relays a request from Mao, conveyed via Chinese Foreign Minister Zhou Enlai, seeking Stalin’s “personal clarifications” of his stand on a potential North Korean action to reunify the country. Mao sought the information after hearing a report from Kim, who had arrived that day in the Chinese capital for a secret two-day visit and clearly claimed that he had received Stalin’s blessing.

  • May 30, 1950

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador in Pyongyang, Report on a Meeting between Shtykov and Kim Il Sung

    Terenti Shtykov reports on Kim Il Sung's military planning for an invasion of South Korea and signals Soviet approval for the invasion.

  • July 01, 1950

    Ciphered telegram, Shtykov to Stalin on the Political Mood in North Korea

    Telegram from Shtykov to Stalin (copied to the Soviet leadership) describing the successes of KPA forces in the South. He also relays the concern of some of the DPRK cadre regarding American intervention.

  • July 04, 1950

    Telegram from Shtykov to Stalin

    Shtykov reports on a meeting with Kim Il Sung and Pak Heonyeong concerning requests for arms, advisers and advice on how to move troops more efficiently. Shtykov proposes resolutions and advice.