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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • 1967

    CSSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'Information: The Most Recent Developments in the Chinese People’s Republic and the CSSR-Chinese Relations'

    Extensive account of CSSR-Chinese relations, including controversy surrounding the Cultural Revolution and Chinese extremism, anti-Soviet proclivities within the Chinese leadership, and the Chinese hydrogen bomb test on June 17th.

  • January 11, 1967

    Cooperation between the Czechoslovak and Cuban Intelligence Services

    The report introduces Czechoslovak's assistance in the Operation MANUEL after the isolation of socialist Castro regime. Cuba looked for alternative routes in Europe in order to promote and influence the revolutionary movement in Latin America. Czechoslovakia assistance in the operation is of a strictly technical nature and its intelligence service is doing its utmost to protect the interests of the country by securing all technical matters. The report says that terminating the assistance was not possible for both practical and political reasons-- all direct flights between Czechoslovakia and Cuba would be suspended and a drastic cooling off of relations between two governments. Czechoslovak's refusal in assisting the operation would be interpreted as a political decision to suspend assistance to the national liberation movement in Latin America countries. However, the reports says that the assistance of Czechoslovak intelligence service to the operation is in no way amounts to agreeing with its political content and constitutes a minor aspect of intelligence work. The Soviet intelligence was also involved in organizing the operation in Moscow and offered assistance to its Cuban counterpart.

  • February 02, 1967

    Memo, CSSR Mission to Secretary-General U Thant, Concerning Czechoslovak Contribution to the UN

    The Permanent Mission of Czechoslovakia to the UN outlines specificities concerning the Government of Czechoslovak Socialist Republic's contribution to the UNs 1966 regular budget.

  • February 09, 1967

    Note from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic to the Embassy of the People's Republic of China in Prague

    The Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs condemns Chinese authorities responsible for threats to the Czech Embassy in Peking, including the forceful holding of the ambassador of the CSSR and other officials and the tearing of the flag.

  • March 07, 1967

    Communist Party of Czechoslovakia, Record of Conversation with Secretary and Member of the Politboro of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Bolivia, Jorge Kolle, Prague

    PCB Politburo member Jorge Kolle Cueto asks on 7 March 1967 to inform the Czechoslovak Communist Party, "on behalf of the CC of the Bolivian CP," regarding "the situation in Bolivia… and his recent meeting with Fidel Castro." After four pages of discussion regarding the depressing internal political situation under 1964 coup leader, General René Barrientos, Kolle announced that "the party must necessarily prepare for the possibility of armed struggle in order to participate in the attempt to overthrow the current regime together with other leftist forces."

  • March 31, 1967

    Czechoslovak Communist Party (CPCz), Intra-party Information Concerning Public Response to USSR-Czechoslovakia Match at the Ice-hockey World Championship in Vienna

    Report describing the polarized public response in Czechoslovakia to the Soviet-Czech hockey match during the World Championships in Vienna. The match (which Czechoslovakia lost 2-4) involved multiple fights and when the Soviet anthem played during the final ceremony it was accompanied by deafening boos and catcalls from the audience.

  • April 01, 1967

    Embassy of the USSR in Czechoslovakia, 'Information About the Reaction in the ČSSR to the Game between the National Teams of the USSR and the ČSSR at the World Championships in Vienna'

    Soviet ambassador in Czechoslovakia, Stepan Chervonenko, sends a report warning about the growth of tension between the Soviet Union and Czechoslovakia. Czechoslovak fans expressed strong hostility and anti-Soviet sentiments at a game between the Soviet and Czechoslovak national teams at the 1967 World Hockey Championships in Vienna.

  • June 17, 1967

    Central Committee of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia, 'The Near East Situation and Our Further Procedure"

    Cover page to a long report on the outcome of the Six-Day War and Czechoslovakian relations with the United Arab Republic.

  • June 17, 1967

    Explanatory Report, Attachment to 'The Near East Situation and Our Further Procedure'

    Excerpts describing Czechoslovakian and other Eastern Bloc countries' involvement in the Six-Day War.

  • June 17, 1967

    Attachment, 'Information about Czechoslovak economic relations with the United Arab Republic and the Syrian Arab Republic'

    Czechoslovakia anticipates decreased trade with the United Arab Republic and Syrian Arab Republic as they suffer negative financial repercussions from their defeat in the Six-Day War.

  • June 17, 1967

    Attachment, 'Preliminary Findings Regarding the Reasons for the United Arab Republic's and the Arab States' Defeat

    Detailed Czechoslovak report explaining the United Arab Republic's defeat in the Six-Day War.

  • June 17, 1967

    Attachment, 'Fundamental Lessons Learned from the Aggression and Proposals for Further Steps'

    Czechoslovakian assessment of the situation in the Middle East following the Six-Day War and recommended foreign policy activities.

  • June 20, 1967

    Attachment, Draft Resolution of the 37th Session of the CC of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia, 'The Near East Situation and Our Further Approach'

    Czechoslovakia offers assistance to the United Arab Republic and the Syrian Arab Republic following their defeat in the Six-Day War with Israel.

  • June 28, 1967

    The Visit of the Czechoslovak President's Special Envoy, V. Koucki, to the UAR

    The document summarizes Czechoslovak Politburo Secretary Vladimir Koucki's conversations with UAR President Gamal A. Nasser, Vice President Zakaria Muhi al-Din,and Arab Socialist Union (ASU) Secretary Ali Sabri during his visit to the UAR. The conversations concerned the Arab-Israeli War of 1967 and the UAR's military and economic situation. Koucki draws three conclusions about the UAR's position, mentioning pressure from internal and external reactionary forces and the lagging national economy. The appendix contains a report on military issues raised during a conversation between the commander of the UAR armed forces, General Muhammad Fawzi, and General Miroslav Smoldash of the Czech delegation. Koucki attributes Egypt's defeat in the war to technical and tactical weaknesses of the military leadership. He recommends that Czech cooperation with the UAR include economic support, military training, and delivery of military equipment.

  • July 29, 1967

    Letter from the Chairman of the KGB Andropov to the Minister of Internal Affairs of the CSSR Kudrna

    Appointment of Soviet officials for discussion of the procedure for joint border monitoring of trains and passengers crossing the Soviet-Czechoslovak border.

  • July 30, 1967

    Telegram from Pyongyang to Bucharest, TOP SECRET, No. 76.276, July 30, 1967

    I. Horjenevski and A. Lazar discuss Czech loans to North Korea and the important purges taking place in North Korea an effort to achieve the "monolithic unity" of the Korean Workers' Party.

  • August, 1967

    General Staff of the Czechoslovak People's Army, 'Report on the Causes, the Course and the Results of the Israeli Aggression in the Near East from the Military-Political Point of View'

    Detailed analysis of Western foreign policy toward the Middle East, the outcome of the Six-Day War, and Czechoslovakian military support of the United Arab Republic and the Syrian Arab Republic.

  • October 09, 1967

    CSSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs No. No. 026.235/67-3, 'Information about Most Recent Measures against the Activities of the Representative Office of the Chinese People’s Republic'

    Account of measures taken in response to provocative activities of the CPR (threats, propaganda, restrictions on freedom of movement, etc) and objectives in pursuing these responses.

  • November 07, 1967

    Complaint by [Government of] Brazil Regarding Czechoslovak Transport of Guerrilla Fighters from Cuba to Latin America

    Head of the 1st Administration of the Ministry of the Interior Josef Houska reports a complaint by the Brazilian government regarding to Czechoslovak assistance of transporting guerrilla fighters from Cuba to Latin America. Brazilian government issued an official warning that relations between Brazil and Czechoslovak could be deteriorated in connection with the support for Cuba. Houska says Brazilian officials' argument could be proof that Czechoslovak specially selected officials making technical arrangement for the transits belong to some section of the Czechoslovak civil service. However, the Czechoslovak authorities cannot be blamed that they go along with the activities of the Cuban Embassy in Prague, which controls the transport of the guerrillas since an embassy is entitled to engage in full diplomatic activities in a friendly country. Houska argues that the Brazilian government does not have conceret evidence for the direct accusation of Czechoslovakia. The position of the Brazilian Ministry of Foreign Affairs could have been the result of pressure by ultra-reactionary forces in domestic policy which are concerned by the opposition activities in Brazil and abroad.

  • November 17, 1967

    Operation MANUEL: Origins, Development and Aims

    Comrade Josef Houska submits a document concerning issues related to cooperation with the Cuban intelligence service especially the Operation MANUEL to the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia. The Operational MANUEL started in 1962 when the Cuban intelligence asked the Czechoslovak resident in Havana to arrange a transit through Prague for Venezuelan nationals who underwent guerrilla training in Cuba. In 1964 talks were held between Cuban and Czechoslovak intelligence services but no formal agreement of the tasks and responsibilities was concluded between the two. The Soviet government was informed about the Operation MANUEL and stated its agreement with the project. Houska says that the main objective of the operation is the education and training of revolutionary cadres from Latin America and the organization of combat groups. Participants of the operation were not confined to cadres from among the ranks of communist parties but also included members from various nationalist and anti-American groupings. The routes of individual participants in the operation were determined by the Cuban intelligence service who mainly directed the Operation MANUEL. Houska says problems that arisen in the course of the operation were solved in collaboration with Cuban and the Soviet authorities. The document cautioned about counter-espionage institutions' increasing interests in the operation and the fact that the US intelligence service agents were among the operation participants. Houska says refusal to offer assistance would have a negative impact on Cuba and Czechoslovakia would lose control over the operation.