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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • November 05, 1948

    Adeeb Farzli and Zionism

    Report that Adeeb al-Farzli has gone undercover to the town of Tel [Nahaas] in order to conduct surveillance on Zionists.

  • May 09, 1949

    Untitled report on Soviet policy towards Zionist Jews

    Fragment describing repression of Zionist Jews in the Soviet Union.

  • July 29, 1949

    Activities of a Jewish Company in Lebanon

    Report regarding a deal between the founders of a Jewish engineering company and a Russian engineer, details of meetings between the founders and the engineer while in Damascus.

  • July 03, 1972

    Moldavian Communist Party Central Committee, no. 210 s, to CPSU Central Committee, 'Proposal Regarding the Organization of KGB Organs in the Frontier Counties of the Republic'

    Request from the Moldavian Communist Party to send KGB officers to Moldavia in light of the “intensification of subversive activities directed against the republic by the special services and ideological centers of the Western countries,” of Israel, and of Romania. Travelers coming from Romania were deemed particularly dangerous because of their efforts “to inculcate our citizens with a nationalist spirit.” A “considerable part of them” smuggled in “materials and literature that are dangerous from the political perspective” while others “propagated the separate course of the Romanian leadership, the idea of breaking off the former Bessarabia from the USSR and uniting it with Romania.”

  • December 06, 1978

    Moldavian Communist Party Central Committee, No. 294s, to President of the USSR Committee for State Security (KGB), Andropov, 'Regarding the Necessity of Increasing the Number of Personnel of the Moldavian SSR KGB'

    The Moldavian Communist Party requests an increase in the number of KGB personnel in Moldavia to assist with efforts to "curb subversive activity" originating in Romania. This “ideological subversion” was further propagated by the Romanian print and broadcast media, through direct mailings (mail correspondence having “surpassed 500 thousand letters per year”) and through Romanian citizens visiting the republic who sought to indoctrinate the Soviet people “in an anti-Soviet, anti-Russian spirit."