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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 02, 1959

    Record of Conversation of N. S. Khrushchev with CC CCP Chairman Mao Zedong, Deputy Chairma Liu Shaoqi, Zhou Enlai, Zhu De, Lin Biao, Politburo Members Peng Zhen and Chen Yi, and Secretariat Member Wang Jiaxiang

    Record of conversation between Nikita Khrushchev and top Chinese Communist Party leaders. Khrushchev blames the Chinese for the border conflict with India and for allowing the Dalai Lama to escape from Tibet. The two sides argue over how the Chinese should have handled these problems, with Mao accusing the Soviet Union of being "time-servers."

  • December 24, 1959

    Draft, Report to the CC CPSU Plenum, 'About the Visit of the Soviet Party-Governmental Delegation to the PRC'

    Soviet record of conversation between delegations from the Communist Parties of the Soviet Union and China. They argue over China's policy toward India and toward Taiwan, and assert that China is pursuing a path that will hurt its Communist allies and risk war. Also notes the extent of Mao's personality cult in China.

  • July 03, 1960

    Report by Nie Rongzhen to Mao Zedong Regarding Science and Technology (Abridged)

    Nie Rongzhen reports to Mao on scientific and technical issues and Soviet assistance and cooperation in the area of nuclear development. The Chinese were becoming frustrated by what they called the Soviet "stranglehold" on key technical data, and led to an unwanted feeling of dependence on their Soviet comrades.

  • July 18, 1960

    Mao Zedong’s Talk at the Beidaihe Central Committee Work Conference (Excerpt)

    Mao Zedong declares that, in the absence of Soviet assistance, China must rely only upon itself in its pursuit of technological modernity and socialism.

  • August 25, 1960

    Journal of Soviet Ambassador to the DPRK A.M. Puzanov for 25 August 1960

    The ambassador describes an August 25 meeting with GDR Ambassador Schneidewind.

  • August 30, 1960

    Note about a Conversation in the Soviet Embassy with Comrade Puzanov

    The ambassadors of the Soviet Union and East Germany in North Korea discuss Kim Il Sung's visits to China and the Soviet Union, the personality cult in North Korea, the economic situation in North Korea, and North Korea's policy towards South Korea.

  • September 19, 1960

    Journal of Soviet Ambassador to the DPRK A.M. Puzanov for 19 September 1960

    Nam Il shows his gratitude on the DPRK construction delegation member's stay in the Soviet Union and informs KWP CC position in the conference of the ministers of railways of the socialist countries.

  • January 11, 1961

    Information from MVR Inspectorate on Yugoslav Intelligence Services Against Bulgaria

    The Ministry of Internal Affairs reports its intelligence findings on the activities of the Yugoslav intelligence services against Bulgaria. Working both from home and in-country, the Yugoslav intelligence is allegedly trying to gather information on a broad set of issues – ranging from trade relations within Comecon, to Bulgaria’s military capacity and its potential to pose a threat to Yugoslav Macedonia.

  • January 09, 1962

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Beck), Report on Deputy Foreign Minister Péter Mód’s talks with political leaders in Cuba

    Ambassador János Beck reports on Foreign Minister Péter Mód’s visit to Cuba, and with whom he met. The report is divided among four different official meetings: Foreign Minister Raul Roa, Prime Minister Fidel Castro, Carlos Rafael Rodriguez, and the Integrated Revolutionary Organizations (ORI). Beck summarizes each meeting separately. Topics include Cuba’s expectation of a US invasion and the US’s current clandestine activities, Organization of American States (OAS) and its use as a political tool in US-Latin American relations, Sino-Soviet relations, socialist unity and the importance of Soviet trade, Cuba’s perceived Soviet military advantage over the US, and the Communist Party’s development/popularity in Cuba. Many of these topics appear in various meetings outlined in the report.

  • December 03, 1962

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Beck), Report on Anastas Mikoyan’s meeting with socialist ambassadors

    Hungarian Ambassador to Cuba János Beck reports on a cocktail party at the Soviet embassy and his discussions with Anastas Mikoyan and other socialist ambassadors. The socialist ambassadors did not meet with Soviet leaders during the Cuban Missile Crisis and were not informed of developments. Beck adds that discussions at the reception did not elaborate beyond published news reports. In one instance, Beck notes that Mikoyan ignored questions about the Cuban public’s criticism of the Soviet handling of the crisis.

  • December 13, 1962

    Communist Party of Czechoslovakia (CPCz), Record of Conversation with Bolivian Delegation to the XII Congress of the CPCz, Secretary in the Politboro of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Bolivia, Raul Ruíz Gonzáles, Prague

    This meeting represents the unofficial side of Czechoslovak foreign policy toward Cold War Latin America: its relations with the region’s Communist parties. Ruíz asks for information on the growing rift between China and the Soviet Union. The meeting, which took place at Ruíz’s request, resulted in several Bolivian Communists being sheltered through Prague’s Operation Manuel on their way home from guerrilla training in Cuba.

  • January 07, 1963

    Minutes of Conversation between Chinese Vice Premier Chen Yi and Indonesian Deputy Prime Minister Subandrio

    Chen Yi and Subandrio discussed the following topics: Whether or not Subandrio should accompany Mrs. Bandaranaike to India, the defeat of the Indian 4th Infantry Division, Soviet blunders in the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Sino-Soviet split, and the Indonesian economic prospects.

  • March 11, 1963

    Secret Telegram from Maneli (Hanoi) to Spasowski-Morski (Warsaw) [Ciphergram No. 3175]

    Cable from Polish Ambassador in Hanoi Maneli to Warsaw, describing a conversation he had with Vietnamese Prime Minister Pham Van Dong and Soviet Ambassador Tovmassian. They discuss the idea of neutralization in Vietnam, and the possibility of the United States pulling forces out. Tovmassian adds that the PRC pressured the DRV to start incidents in the demilitarized zone.

  • June 23, 1963

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Görög), Report on Reactions to Fidel Castro’s Trip to the Soviet Union

    Chargé d’Affaires ad interim Erzsébet Görög writes a preliminary assessment of Castro’s state visit to the Soviet Union in 1963. Görög reports on improvements in Cuba’s party organization and positive reactions from the Cuban public and media on Castro’s visit. Görög notes different reactions to the visit between the economic/technical and artistic intelligentsia, adding that “Khrushchev managed to win Fidel over to his side in the Soviet-Chinese dispute.” Other topics include emigration and external counter-revolutionary activities.

  • June 25, 1963

    Report from Hungarian Embassy, Prague, on Czechoslovak-Cuban Relations

    Hungarian ambassador to Czechoslovakia Lajos Cséby summarizes Deputy Head of the Sixth Main Department [of the Czechoslovak Ministry of Foreign Affairs] Stross’s report on relations between Cuba and Czechoslovakia. Stross reports friendly relations between the two countries, which did not experience difficulties during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Stross outlines Cuba’s problems, economically and politically, and believes that Cuba’s revolutionary success depends on its economic growth. Cuba misunderstood the Soviet Union’s approach to the Cuban Missile Crisis. This led to signs of Chinese influence on Cuban politics, which Stross believes are reversing since Castro’s [1963] visit to the Soviet Union.

  • August 29, 1963

    Hungarian Embassy in Sofia, Report on Bulgarian-Cuban Relations

    Hungarian Ambassador to Bulgaria Karoly Prath summarizes developments on Bulgarian-Cuban relations gathered from Hungarian-Bulgarian diplomatic contacts. Bulgarian-Cuban relations were not adversely effected by the Cuban Missile Crisis. The relationship is dominated by economic development (e.g. the expansion of trade, specialist exchanges, Bulgarian loans to Cuba, the root causes of Cuba's economic difficulties). Prath also discusses Bulgarian concerns over the influence of China on Cuba.

  • October 08, 1963

    Letter from Gomulka to Khrushchev, Marked 'Final Version'

    Letter from Gomulka to Khrushchev discussing Polish opposition to Soviet proposal for a Non-Proliferation Treaty. Gomulka suggests that the treaty will further split the communist camp. While discussing the state of Sino-Soviet relations, the Polish leader suggests that the Soviet Union and the PRC adopt a common position in matters of foreign policy in order to strengthen the power of the Socialist camp.

  • November 08, 1963

    Conversation with Comrades Pimenov, Witek and Shicha on 27 October 1963

    The Council of UDSSR Embassy Pimenov and the First Secretaries of the Polish and Czech Embassy discussed the problematic economic cooperation between North Korea and socialist countries, accusing North Korea of exploiting the help offered.

  • November 18, 1963

    Record of Conversation between Zhou Enlai, Chen Yi, and Head of Pakistan’s Delegation Participating in the PRC’s National Day Celebration, Maulana Abdul Hamid Khan Bhashani

    Conversation between Zhou Enlai and Abdul Hamid Khan Bhashani, representing Pakistan. The two discuss, at length, their criticisms of United States imperialism, pointing to, among other things, Algeria and French Indochina as examples of imperialism's impending fall. Zhou then explains to Bhashani the importance of holding an Afro Asian Conference before the upcoming Non-Aligned Conference, which Zhou views as an attempt by Nehru and Tito to "destroy the Afro-Asian Conference." Conversation concludes by discussing the Kashmir conflict.

  • January 01, 1964

    Report by Shri S. Sinha, Director (EARC) – Ministry of External Affairs, 'Brief Analysis of the propagandist statements on disarmament and nuclear-free zone made by the Peoples Republic of China'

    The Peoples Republic of China supports disarmament and a nuclear-free zone in the Asian and Pacific Regions strictly for tactical reasons