Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

SEARCH RESULTS

  • May 23, 1949

    Cipher Telegrams Regarding Bulgarian Request to Sending Soviet investigators to Sofia

    Stalin and Molotov approve a BCP CC request for the dispatch of Soviet investigators to assist in Kiril Slavkov’s trial

  • October 18, 1949

    Cipher Message from Kolarov and Chervenkov to Stalin on Investigated Bulgarian Armed Forces Commanders

    Vassil Kolarov and Vulko Chervenkov report on the measures taken against Bulgarian cadets at the Voroshilov Military Academy implicated in unlawful activities.

  • January 16, 1950

    Information at Bulgarian Plenum on Stalin's View on the Purges in the Bulgarian Communist Party

    Georgi Chankov and Vulko Chervenkov present a report before the BCP CC on their recent meeting with Joseph Stalin, Georgi Malenkov and Nikolai Bulganin in Moscow. Among the issues discussed were the ongoing purges in the BCP, the role of the Agrarian Movement in the government, the state of the Bulgarian armed forces and the Bulgarian industrial and agricultural production.

  • January 24, 1954

    Statement from A.G. Krymov (Guo Zhaotang), a Prisoner in Noril’sk and Former Member of the Chinese Communist Party and the Executive Committee of the Comintern

    A statement from A.G. Krymov, where he pleas for cancellation of his verdict to a labor camp and to gain permission to serve the Communist cause in either the Soviet Union or China. In March 1938 he was arrested by the NKVD in Moscow and exposed as an enemy of the people.

  • March 17, 1954

    Letter, From I.Vinogradov to Soviet Central Committee Secretary M. A. Suslov, Regarding Afanasii Gavrilovich Krymov, a Prisoner of a Soviet Corrective-Labor Camp

    Concerning the letter from Afanasii Gavrilovich Krymov, currently serving a sentence in a MVD [Ministry of Internal Affairs] USSR corrective-labor camp, with a request to look over his case and permit him to move to China.

  • March 24, 1954

    Telegram, Central Committee of the Communist Party of China, Information on Afanasii Gavrilovich Krymov

    Information on Krymov. Afanasii Gavrilovich Krymov (also Evgenii Kyo, Guo Zhaotang, Ko Saotang, Guo Zhoutao, Zheng Zhitang) was born in 1905 in the city of Shanghai, a Chinese, and a citizen of the USSR. He finished his higher education at the Party History Institute of Red Professors. He is a candidate of history.

  • 1956

    Materials from the Trial of Ivan-Assen Georgiev

  • February 25, 1956

    Khrushchev's Secret Speech, 'On the Cult of Personality and Its Consequences,' Delivered at the Twentieth Party Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

    In a secret speech before a closed plenum of the 20th Congress of the CPSU, Khrushchev denounced Stalin’s cult of the personality. In addition, he revealed that Stalin had rounded up thousands of people and sent them into a huge system of political work camps (Gulags). This revelation was met with astonishment by many present for the speech, but helped to break the power that Stalin still held over the country.

  • June 26, 1956

    Minutes of a Bulgarian Politburo Meeting for the Investigation of the Political Processes of 06/26/1956

    Georgi Tsankov testifies before a BCP CC Commission for the Investigation of the Political Trials [against opposition leaders]. He emphasizes the role of the Soviet advisor to the Bulgarian Ministry of Internal Affairs, Gen. Filatov, regarding the human rights abuse of detainees. Vulko Chervenkov talks about Filatov’s disregard of Politburo’s policy decisions, as well as about his eventual withdraw to Moscow by Stalin.

  • November 08, 1963

    Proposal from Gen. D. Dikov and Bulgarian Politburo Resolution on Investigation and Trial of Georgiev

  • December 31, 1963

    Excerpts from the Prosecutor's Act and the Verdict Against Ivan-Assen Georgiev

  • January 29, 1964

    Analysis of Bulgarian State Security Second Directorate on Hypocrite (DVULICHNIK) Operation against Georgiev

  • 1969

    Materials from the Trial of Dr. Radan Sarafov

    Materials from the trial case against Dr. Radan Sarafov, Bulgarian physician.

  • January 23, 1969

    Excerpts from the Prosecutors Act and Supreme Court Decision on the Sentence of Dr. Sarafov

  • September 29, 1972

    Letter from Gen. M. Spasov and Gen. Gr. Shopov to T. Zhivkov against former Counterintelligence Directorate Chief Gen. Grigorov

    A Letter to Todor Zhivkov from Gen. Mircho Spasov, former Deputy Minister of the Interior and Deputy Chief of CC BCP "Military" Department, and Gen. Grigor Shopov, First Deputy Minister of the Interior, with accusations against Gen. Georgi Grigorov, former KDS Second Main Directorate (VGU) Chief. In the letter they both insist that instead of being promoted to Vice Chairman of the State Committee of Tourism, Gen. Grigorov had to "to be imprisoned"

  • February 19, 1973

    Information from Bulgaria on the Dismissal of Charges Against Army Officers for Anti-Party and Anti-State Activity

    Information regarding the reaction of a group of 16 Bulgarian Armed Forces officers, discharged for “anti-party and anti-state activity”. Some of them were rehabilitated with a CC BCP Secretariat Resolution “B-9” on October 13, 1972. The BCP CC’s Military Department recommends that the State Security Committee’s Sixth Directorate continue monitoring the group. KDS should also brief regularly the BCP CC about the behavior of those former officers who have not yet been rehabilitated. While those with favorable disposition towards the Party line should be recommended for future rehabilitation, others who are still standing on “anti-party” positions must be warned in the course.

  • September 25, 1986

    Meeting Minutes of the Politburo of the CC CPSU, Regarding Persecution of Political Dissidents and Spies

    In this September 1986 excerpt, Gorbachev receives a report from KGB chief Chebrikov that he had requested on “what kinds of people are serving sentences for crimes, which Western propaganda calls political.” Obviously following Gorbachev’s lead, Chebrikov proposes to alleviate the prison sentences of two-thirds of the 240 persons he lists under this category; but, in response to a question from Gromyko, he notes two cases where the guilty parties had already received a sentence that could not be reduced—execution for espionage.

  • June, 2007

    The Pathfinders (the Sinyavsky-Daniel show trial. Folder 41. The Chekist Anthology

    In this case Mitrokhin provides a history of the Sinyavsky-Daniel show trial. Between 1959 and 1962 two unknown Russian authors (pseudonyms Tertz and Arzhak) published two anti-soviet books, “This is Moscow Speaking” and “The Trial Begins,” in Western countries. The KGB was not familiar with the authors and did not know where they lived. According to Mitrokhin, KGB agent “Efimov” discovered that a litterateur from Moscow, Yuliy Daniel, had some anti-soviet materials. In the beginning of 1964 the analysis of all available information proved that Daniel was the author of “This is Moscow Speaking” and that his pseudonym was Arzhak. It was soon discovered that Tertz, whose real name was Sinyavsky, was Arzhak’s close friend. The KGB began a new operation “The Imitators,” which helped to learn about their connections abroad, new works in progress, places where authors kept their original writings as well as the means they used to send their literature to the West. Mitrokhin states that KGB agents had difficulties working because Sinyavsky once was an agent for the KGB, so he was familiar with all of the techniques. In September 1965, after the KGB collected all of the necessary information, a criminal case was opened. Sinyavsky and Daniel were arrested. Mitrokhin provides details of the investigation process. In February 1966 the Supreme Court of the Soviet Union sentenced “the imitators.” Sinyavsky was sentenced to seven years in jail and Daniel was sentenced to five. After Sinyavsky served his time, he moved to France with his wife where he became well respected among immigrants. According to Mitrokhin, however, later on he lost that respect because he published a provocative book A Walk with Pushkin. Mitrokhin states that the KGB kept monitoring Sinyavsky’s activities throughout his career in France.