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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • January 28, 1981

    Memorandum from John N. McMahon to the Director of Central Intelligence, '[Redacted] Report'

    Translation of a Polish document describing procedures for introducing martial law. It includes suggestions on labor relations, safeguarding state security, and supplying the populace.

  • January 30, 1981

    Memorandum from John McMahon to the Director of Central Intelligence, '[Redacted] Report'

    Translation of a document concerning the official procedures to transition Poland to martial law. Includes martial law guidelines, objectives, and effects on Polish society.

  • February 11, 1981

    Memorandum from John McMahon to the Secretaries of State and Defense and Director of the National Security Agency, 'Polish Government Plans for the Possible Introduction of Martial Law'

    Translation of document discussing several barriers to the implementation of martial law in Poland. This includes opposition from the Polish United Workers' Party, response to counterrevolutionaries, and dry runs of implementing martial law.

  • February 13, 1981

    Memorandum from John McMahon to the Director of Central Intelligence, '[Redacted] Report'

    Translation of an address made by Polish General Wojciech Jaruzelski. He discusses how Poland's problems are a result of leadership not adhering to Socialist-Leninist ideology and the need for peaceful intervention in Poland.

  • February 24, 1981

    Memorandum from John McMahon to the Secretaries of State and Defense and Director of the National Security Agency, 'Current Situation in the Polish Government and Ministry of Defense'

    Translated document outlines a conversation with Brezhnev where he expresses his concerns over counterrevolutionaries. The threat of young people joining the Solidarnosc movement and GDR & Czechoslovakian propaganda to peace in Poland.

  • March 16, 1981

    Memorandum from John McMahon to the Secretaries of State and Defense and Director of the National Security Agency, '[Redacted] Report'

    Translated memorandum reports the coordinated efforts of the Ministries of Internal Affairs, Defense, and Central Committee Propaganda Department to implement martial law in Poland.

  • March 30, 1981

    Memorandum from John McMahon to the Secretaries of State and Defense and Director of the National Security Agency, '[Redacted] Report'

    Translated document discusses possible military and Soviet intervention to deal with political unrest in the wake of implementing martial law.

  • March 31, 1981

    Memorandum from John McMahon to the Secretaries of State and Defense and Director of the National Security Agency, '[Redacted] Report'

    Translation echos General Jaruzelski's comments on his and deputy ministers authority in matters of national defense - delegating power while still maintaining direction.

  • April 01, 1981

    Memorandum from John McMahon to the Secretaries of State and Defense and Director of the National Security Agency, [Redacted] Report'

    Translated Polish army document listing all the participants in the Decision-making Game of February 16, 1981. The list includes names from the Ministry of Internal Affairs, Ministry of National Defense, and Polish United Workers Party Central Committee.

  • April 02, 1981

    Memorandum from John McMahon to the Secretaries of State and Defense and Director of the National Security Agency, 'Soviet Reaction to Polish Proposals Regarding the Declaration of Martial Law'

    Translated memorandum discusses how Ministry of Defense documents concerning martial law were translated and presented to Brezhnev. The document later explains the parameters set up by Brezhnev and Polish officials under which martial must be set up and executed.

  • July 01, 1981

    Memorandum from Max Hugel to the Director of Central Intelligence, '[Redacted] Report'

    Translation of an agenda from the meeting of Polish National Defense Committee of June 19, 1981 involving the Ministry of Internal Affairs, National Defense, and the Defense Industry Commission.

  • September 13, 1981

    Protocol No. 002/81 of the Meeting of the Committee for the Defense of the Homeland

    Meeting of the Committee for the Defense of the Homeland on the implementation of martial law in Poland. Committee members discuss where to increase militarization to be prepared for martial law, and how best to protect martial law through propaganda.

  • September 18, 1981

    Memorandum from John Stein to the Secretaries of State and Defense and Director of the National Security Agency, 'Agenda for the Meeting of the National Defense Committee on 14 September; Current Positions of the Political and Military Leadership...'

    Translated agenda of the National Defense Committee meeting from September 14th, as well as outline the positions of military and government officials on the implementation of martial law.

  • April 14, 1988

    Lecture by Sergei Akhromeyev, 'The Current State of Soviet Military Doctrine'

    This is a transcript of a lecture delivered by Sergei Akhromeyev, the Chief of the General Staff of the Soviet Armed Forces, to the Polish General Staff about Soviet military doctrine in early 1988. The document defines what the Soviets meant by military doctrine, differentiating between the doctrine of the Soviet Union and the Warsaw Pact by stressing the former’s wider range objectives, especially concerning the use of strategic nuclear weapons. In addition, it identifies contemporary issues facing Soviet doctrine and analyzes topics such as nuclear non-proliferation, reduction of nuclear stockpiles and refutes the idea that nuclear weapons should be used in a counter-offensive operation. It stresses the importance of defense, negating offensive military preparedness in lieu of purely defensive Warsaw Pact capabilities (albeit altogether sufficient to successfully deter a NATO attack from the West). It also discusses the results of the March 2-3 1988 NATO talks and concludes that the West is not willing to stop the arms race and is increasing its offensive capabilities. The Warsaw Pact’s response should include increased military research, better vigilance to capture signals of a possible attack and more tactical and technical training for the military command. It asserts that even though a war is less likely than in the past, quoting Gorbachev, “the nature of capitalism itself can be the cause of war.”